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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:雷昭 大小:MZ8dYHl899695KB 下载:WihTGXsN58251次
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日期:2020-08-08 17:42:16
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "See now, how men lay blame upon us gods for what is after allnothing but their own folly. Look at Aegisthus; he must needs makelove to Agamemnon's wife unrighteously and then kill Agamemnon, thoughhe knew it would be the death of him; for I sent Mercury to warn himnot to do either of these things, inasmuch as Orestes would be sure totake his revenge when he grew up and wanted to return home. Mercurytold him this in all good will but he would not listen, and now he haspaid for everything in full."
2.  "Sir," said Telemachus, "as regards your question, so long as myfather was here it was well with us and with the house, but the godsin their displeasure have willed it otherwise, and have hidden himaway more closely than mortal man was ever yet hidden. I could haveborne it better even though he were dead, if he had fallen with hismen before Troy, or had died with friends around him when the daysof his fighting were done; for then the Achaeans would have built amound over his ashes, and I should myself have been heir to hisrenown; but now the storm-winds have spirited him away we know notwither; he is gone without leaving so much as a trace behind him,and I inherit nothing but dismay. Nor does the matter end simplywith grief for the loss of my father; heaven has laid sorrows uponme of yet another kind; for the chiefs from all our islands,Dulichium, Same, and the woodland island of Zacynthus, as also all theprincipal men of Ithaca itself, are eating up my house under thepretext of paying their court to my mother, who will neither pointblank say that she will not marry, nor yet bring matters to an end; sothey are making havoc of my estate, and before long will do so alsowith myself."
3.  "Father Jove," answered the stockman, "would indeed that you mightso ordain it. If some god were but to bring Ulysses back, you shouldsee with what might and main I would fight for him."
4.  "I saw also the dreadful fate of Tantalus, who stood in a lakethat reached his chin; he was dying to quench his thirst, but couldnever reach the water, for whenever the poor creature stooped todrink, it dried up and vanished, so that there was nothing but dryground- parched by the spite of heaven. There were tall trees,moreover, that shed their fruit over his head- pears, pomegranates,apples, sweet figs and juicy olives, but whenever the poor creaturestretched out his hand to take some, the wind tossed the branches backagain to the clouds.
5.  This was what they said, but they did not know what was going tohappen. Then Antinous said, "Comrades, let there be no loud talking,lest some of it get carried inside. Let us be up and do that insilence, about which we are all of a mind."
6.  Eumaeus was frightened at the outcry they all raised, so he putthe bow down then and there, but Telemachus shouted out at him fromthe other side of the cloisters, and threatened him saying, "FatherEumaeus, bring the bow on in spite of them, or young as I am I willpelt you with stones back to the country, for I am the better man ofthe two. I wish I was as much stronger than all the other suitors inthe house as I am than you, I would soon send some of them off sickand sorry, for they mean mischief."

计划指导

1.  Thus did she talk with her maids as she sat in her own room, andin the meantime Ulysses was getting his dinner. Then she called forthe swineherd and said, "Eumaeus, go and tell the stranger to comehere, I want to see him and ask him some questions. He seems to havetravelled much, and he may have seen or heard something of myunhappy husband."
2.  "I will say what I think will be best," answered Ulysses. "Firstwash and put your shirts on; tell the maids also to go to their ownroom and dress; Phemius shall then strike up a dance tune on his lyre,so that if people outside hear, or any of the neighbours, or someone going along the street happens to notice it, they may thinkthere is a wedding in the house, and no rumours about the death of thesuitors will get about in the town, before we can escape to thewoods upon my own land. Once there, we will settle which of thecourses heaven vouchsafes us shall seem wisest."
3.  This was what he said, but all the time he was expecting to beable to string the bow and shoot through the iron, whereas in facthe was to be the first that should taste of the arrows from thehands of Ulysses, whom he was dishonouring in his own house- eggingthe others on to do so also.
4.  Penelope presently reached the oak threshold of the store room;the carpenter had planed this duly, and had drawn a line on it so asto get it quite straight; he had then set the door posts into it andhung the doors. She loosed the strap from the handle of the door,put in the key, and drove it straight home to shoot back the boltsthat held the doors; these flew open with a noise like a bullbellowing in a meadow, and Penelope stepped upon the raisedplatform, where the chests stood in which the fair linen and clotheswere laid by along with fragrant herbs: reaching thence, she took downthe bow with its bow case from the peg on which it hung. She satdown with it on her knees, weeping bitterly as she took the bow out ofits case, and when her tears had relieved her, she went to thecloister where the suitors were, carrying the bow and the quiver, withthe many deadly arrows that were inside it. Along with her came hermaidens, bearing a chest that contained much iron and bronze which herhusband had won as prizes. When she reached the suitors, she stoodby one of the bearing-posts supporting the roof of the cloister,holding a veil before her face, and with a maid on either side of her.Then she said:
5.  Thus did he speak, and they did even as he had said. First theywashed and put their shirts on, while the women got ready. ThenPhemius took his lyre and set them all longing for sweet song andstately dance. The house re-echoed with the sound of men and womendancing, and the people outside said, "I suppose the queen has beengetting married at last. She ought to be ashamed of herself for notcontinuing to protect her husband's property until he comes home."
6.  Ulysses answered, "I hope you may be as dear to the gods as youare to me, for having saved me from going about and getting intotrouble; there is nothing worse than being always ways on the tramp;still, when men have once got low down in the world they will gothrough a great deal on behalf of their miserable bellies. Sincehowever you press me to stay here and await the return ofTelemachus, tell about Ulysses' mother, and his father whom he left onthe threshold of old age when he set out for Troy. Are they stillliving or are they already dead and in the house of Hades?"

推荐功能

1.  On this the day broke, but Ulysses heard the sound of her weeping,and it puzzled him, for it seemed as though she already knew him andwas by his side. Then he gathered up the cloak and the fleeces onwhich he had lain, and set them on a seat in the cloister, but he tookthe bullock's hide out into the open. He lifted up his hands toheaven, and prayed, saying "Father Jove, since you have seen fit tobring me over land and sea to my own home after all the afflictionsyou have laid upon me, give me a sign out of the mouth of some oneor other of those who are now waking within the house, and let me haveanother sign of some kind from outside."
2.  "Here we entered, but so dark was the night that some god musthave brought us in, for there was nothing whatever to be seen. A thickmist hung all round our ships; the moon was hidden behind a mass ofclouds so that no one could have seen the island if he had lookedfor it, nor were there any breakers to tell us we were close inshore before we found ourselves upon the land itself; when, however,we had beached the ships, we took down the sails, went ashore andcamped upon the beach till daybreak.
3.  Noemon then went back to his father's house, but Antinous andEurymachus were very angry. They told the others to leave off playing,and to come and sit down along with themselves. When they came,Antinous son of Eupeithes spoke in anger. His heart was black withrage, and his eyes flashed fire as he said:
4.  "Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, so you would start home to yourown land at once? Good luck go with you, but if you could only knowhow much suffering is in store for you before you get back to your owncountry, you would stay where you are, keep house along with me, andlet me make you immortal, no matter how anxious you may be to see thiswife of yours, of whom you are thinking all the time day after day;yet I flatter myself that at am no whit less tall or well-looking thanshe is, for it is not to be expected that a mortal woman shouldcompare in beauty with an immortal."
5.   Then Minerva said, "Yes, father stranger, I will show you thehouse you want, for Alcinous lives quite close to my own father. Iwill go before you and show the way, but say not a word as you go, anddo not look at any man, nor ask him questions; for the people herecannot abide strangers, and do not like men who come from some otherplace. They are a sea-faring folk, and sail the seas by the grace ofNeptune in ships that glide along like thought, or as a bird in theair."
6.  "'I will do so gladly,' answered she, 'if you men will first swearme a solemn oath that you will do me no harm by the way.'

应用

1.  BOOK XV.
2.  And Eumaeus answered, "Old man, you have told us an excellent story,and have said nothing so far but what is quite satisfactory; for thepresent, therefore, you shall want neither clothing nor anythingelse that a stranger in distress may reasonably expect, butto-morrow morning you have to shake your own old rags about yourbody again, for we have not many spare cloaks nor shirts up here,but every man has only one. When Ulysses' son comes home again he willgive you both cloak and shirt, and send you wherever you may want togo."
3.  As he spoke he sat down, and Telemachus threw his arms about hisfather and wept. They were both so much moved that they cried aloudlike eagles or vultures with crooked talons that have been robbed oftheir half fledged young by peasants. Thus piteously did they weep,and the sun would have gone down upon their mourning if Telemachus hadnot suddenly said, "In what ship, my dear father, did your crewbring you to Ithaca? Of what nation did they declare themselves to be-for you cannot have come by land?"
4、  As he spoke he girded on his armour. Then he roused Telemachus,Philoetius, and Eumaeus, and told them all to put on their armouralso. This they did, and armed themselves. When they had done so, theyopened the gates and sallied forth, Ulysses leading the way. It wasnow daylight, but Minerva nevertheless concealed them in darknessand led them quickly out of the town.
5、  "'You will now come to the Thrinacian island, and here you willsee many herds of cattle and flocks of sheep belonging to the sun-god-seven herds of cattle and seven flocks of sheep, with fifty head ineach flock. They do not breed, nor do they become fewer in number, andthey are tended by the goddesses Phaethusa and Lampetie, who arechildren of the sun-god Hyperion by Neaera. Their mother when shehad borne them and had done suckling them sent them to theThrinacian island, which was a long way off, to live there and lookafter their father's flocks and herds. If you leave these flocksunharmed, and think of nothing but getting home, you may yet aftermuch hardship reach Ithaca; but if you harm them, then I forewarnyou of the destruction both of your ship and of your comrades; andeven though you may yourself escape, you will return late, in badplight, after losing all your men.'

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网友评论(Vw66JZgc17161))

  • 伊波拉吉莫 08-07

      Meantime the suitors went on board and sailed their ways over thesea, intent on murdering Telemachus. Now there is a rocky islet calledAsteris, of no great size, in mid channel between Ithaca and Samos,and there is a harbour on either side of it where a ship can lie. Herethen the Achaeans placed themselves in ambush.

  • 贝尔福特 08-07

      "There you go," cried he, "and a precious pair you are. See howheaven brings birds of the same feather to one another. Where, pray,master swineherd, are you taking this poor miserable object? Itwould make any one sick to see such a creature at table. A fellow likethis never won a prize for anything in his life, but will go aboutrubbing his shoulders against every man's door post, and begging,not for swords and cauldrons like a man, but only for a few scraps notworth begging for. If you would give him to me for a hand on mystation, he might do to clean out the folds, or bring a bit of sweetfeed to the kids, and he could fatten his thighs as much as he pleasedon whey; but he has taken to bad ways and will not go about any kindof work; he will do nothing but beg victuals all the town over, tofeed his insatiable belly. I say, therefore and it shall surely be- ifhe goes near Ulysses' house he will get his head broken by thestools they will fling at him, till they turn him out."

  • 祁东敏 08-07

       When Euryclea heard this she began to cry, and spoke fondly tohim, saying, "My dear child, what ever can have put such notion asthat into your head? Where in the world do you want to go to- you, whoare the one hope of the house? Your poor father is dead and gone insome foreign country nobody knows where, and as soon as your back isturned these wicked ones here will be scheming to get you put out ofthe way, and will share all your possessions among themselves; staywhere you are among your own people, and do not go wandering andworrying your life out on the barren ocean."

  • 王兰成 08-07

      As soon as Euryclea had got the scarred limb in her hands and hadwell hold of it, she recognized it and dropped the foot at once. Theleg fell into the bath, which rang out and was overturned, so that allthe water was spilt on the ground; Euryclea's eyes between her joy andher grief filled with tears, and she could not speak, but she caughtUlysses by the beard and said, "My dear child, I am sure you must beUlysses himself, only I did not know you till I had actually touchedand handled you."

  • 张馨予 08-06

    {  "Thus through the livelong day to the going down of the sun westayed there eating and drinking our fill, but when the sun wentdown and it came on dark, we camped upon the sea shore. When the childof morning, fingered Dawn, appeared, I called a council and said,'My friends, we are in very great difficulties; listen therefore tome. We have no idea where the sun either sets or rises, so that wedo not even know East from West. I see no way out of it; nevertheless,we must try and find one. We are certainly on an island, for I went ashigh as I could this morning, and saw the sea reaching all round it tothe horizon; it lies low, but towards the middle I saw smoke risingfrom out of a thick forest of trees.'

  • 雷布金 08-05

      The rest agreed, and Leiodes son of OEnops was the first to rise. Hewas sacrificial priest to the suitors, and sat in the corner nearthe mixing-bowl. He was the only man who hated their evil deeds andwas indignant with the others. He was now the first to take the bowand arrow, so he went on to the pavement to make his trial, but hecould not string the bow, for his hands were weak and unused to hardwork, they therefore soon grew tired, and he said to the suitors,"My friends, I cannot string it; let another have it; this bow shalltake the life and soul out of many a chief among us, for it isbetter to die than to live after having missed the prize that wehave so long striven for, and which has brought us so long together.Some one of us is even now hoping and praying that he may marryPenelope, but when he has seen this bow and tried it, let him wooand make bridal offerings to some other woman, and let Penelopemarry whoever makes her the best offer and whose lot it is to winher."}

  • 陈婷明 08-05

      "'My dear nurse," said Penelope, "do not exult too confidentlyover all this. You know how delighted every one would be to seeUlysses come home- more particularly myself, and the son who hasbeen born to both of us; but what you tell me cannot be really true.It is some god who is angry with the suitors for their greatwickedness, and has made an end of them; for they respected no manin the whole world, neither rich nor poor, who came near them, whocame near them, and they have come to a bad end in consequence oftheir iniquity. Ulysses is dead far away from the Achaean land; hewill never return home again."

  • 翟鸿祥 08-05

      Thus said the suitors, but Antinous paid them no heed. MeanwhileTelemachus was furious about the blow that had been given to hisfather, and though no tear fell from him, he shook his head in silenceand brooded on his revenge.

  • 常伟 08-04

       And Jove answered, "My child, why should you ask me? Was it not byyour own arrangement that Ulysses came home and took his revengeupon the suitors? Do whatever you like, but I will tell you what Ithink will be most reasonable arrangement. Now that Ulysses isrevenged, let them swear to a solemn covenant, in virtue of which heshall continue to rule, while we cause the others to forgive andforget the massacre of their sons and brothers. Let them then allbecome friends as heretofore, and let peace and plenty reign."

  • 郭平 08-02

    {  Calypso smiled at this and caressed him with her hand: "You know agreat deal," said she, "but you are quite wrong here. May heaven aboveand earth below be my witnesses, with the waters of the river Styx-and this is the most solemn oath which a blessed god can take- thatI mean you no sort of harm, and am only advising you to do exactlywhat I should do myself in your place. I am dealing with you quitestraightforwardly; my heart is not made of iron, and I am very sorryfor you."

  • 彼得森 08-02

      When Ulysses and Penelope had had their fill of love they felltalking with one another. She told him how much she had had to bear inseeing the house filled with a crowd of wicked suitors who hadkilled so many sheep and oxen on her account, and had drunk so manycasks of wine. Ulysses in his turn told her what he had suffered,and how much trouble he had himself given to other people. He told hereverything, and she was so delighted to listen that she never wentto sleep till he had ended his whole story.

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