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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:方丽华 大小:kFVhyf8r80466KB 下载:3n0JCKyI52231次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:rQ57yEut63591条
日期:2020-08-09 14:06:09
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谢赫萨巴赫·哈立德·哈马德·萨巴赫

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  This Palamon answer'd, and said again: "Cousin, forsooth of this opinion Thou hast a vain imagination. This prison caused me not for to cry; But I was hurt right now thorough mine eye Into mine heart; that will my bane* be. *destruction The fairness of the lady that I see Yond in the garden roaming to and fro, Is cause of all my crying and my woe. I *n'ot wher* she be woman or goddess, *know not whether* But Venus is it, soothly* as I guess, *truly And therewithal on knees adown he fill, And saide: "Venus, if it be your will You in this garden thus to transfigure Before me sorrowful wretched creature, Out of this prison help that we may scape. And if so be our destiny be shape By etern word to dien in prison, Of our lineage have some compassion, That is so low y-brought by tyranny."
2.  When I had all this folk behold, And found me *loose, and not y-hold,* *at liberty and unrestrained* And I had mused longe while Upon these walles of beryle, That shone lighter than any glass, And made *well more* than it was *much greater To seemen ev'rything, y-wis, As kindly* thing of Fame it is; <48> *natural I gan forth roam until I fand* *found The castle-gate on my right hand, Which all so well y-carven was, That never such another n'as;* *was not And yet it was by Adventure* *chance Y-wrought, and not by *subtile cure.* *careful art* It needeth not you more to tell, To make you too longe dwell, Of these gates' flourishings, Nor of compasses,* nor carvings, *devices Nor how they had in masonries, As corbets, <49> full of imageries. But, Lord! so fair it was to shew, For it was all with gold behew.* *coloured But in I went, and that anon; There met I crying many a one "A largess! largess! <50> hold up well! God save the Lady of this pell,* *palace Our owen gentle Lady Fame, And them that will to have name Of us!" Thus heard I cryen all, And fast they came out of the hall, And shooke *nobles and sterlings,* *coins <51> And some y-crowned were as kings, With crownes wrought fall of lozenges; And many ribands, and many fringes, Were on their clothes truely Then at the last espied I That pursuivantes and herauds,* *heralds That cry riche folke's lauds,* *praises They weren all; and ev'ry man Of them, as I you telle can, Had on him throwen a vesture Which that men call a coat-armure, <52> Embroidered wondrously rich, As though there were *naught y-lich;* *nothing like it* But naught will I, so may I thrive, *Be aboute to descrive* *concern myself with describing* All these armes that there were, That they thus on their coates bare, For it to me were impossible; Men might make of them a bible Twenty foote thick, I trow. For, certain, whoso coulde know Might there all the armes see'n Of famous folk that have been In Afric', Europe, and Asie, Since first began the chivalry.
3.  "Hide, Absolon, thy gilte* tresses clear; *golden Esther, lay thou thy meekness all adown; Hide, Jonathan, all thy friendly mannere, Penelope, and Marcia Catoun,<14> Make of your wifehood no comparisoun; Hide ye your beauties, Isoude <15> and Helene; My lady comes, that all this may distain.* *outdo, obscure
4.  1. In this Tale Chaucer seems to have followed an old French story, which also formed the groundwork of the first story in the eighth day of the "Decameron."
5.  The statue of Mars upon a carte* stood *chariot Armed, and looked grim as he were wood*, *mad And over his head there shone two figures Of starres, that be cleped in scriptures, That one Puella, that other Rubeus. <51> This god of armes was arrayed thus: A wolf there stood before him at his feet With eyen red, and of a man he eat: With subtle pencil painted was this story, In redouting* of Mars and of his glory. *reverance, fear
6.  40. Yellow goldes: The sunflower, turnsol, or girasol, which turns with and seems to watch the sun, as a jealous lover his mistress.

计划指导

1.  21. Most manuscripts, evidently in error, have "Stilbon" and "Calidone" for Chilon and Lacedaemon. Chilon was one of the seven sages of Greece, and flourished about B.C. 590. According to Diogenes Laertius, he died, under the pressure of age and joy, in the arms of his son, who had just been crowned victor at the Olympic games.
2.  9. Lordes' hestes may not be y-feign'd: it will not do merely to feign compliance with a lord's commands.
3.  7. Contour-house: counting-house; French, "comptoir."
4.  8. The tidife: The titmouse, or any other small bird, which sometimes brings up the cuckoo's young when its own have been destroyed. See note 44 to "The Assembly of Fowls."
5.  And in a privy corner, in disport, Found I Venus and her porter Richess, That was full noble and hautain* of her port; *haughty <16> Dark was that place, but afterward lightness I saw a little, unneth* it might be less; *scarcely And on a bed of gold she lay to rest, Till that the hote sun began to west.* *decline towards the wesr
6.  61. On the dais: see note 32 to the Prologue.

推荐功能

1.  And gan to call, and dress* him to arise, *prepare Rememb'ring him his errand was to do'n From Troilus, and eke his great emprise; And cast, and knew in *good plight* was the Moon *favourable aspect* To do voyage, and took his way full soon Unto his niece's palace there beside Now Janus, god of entry, thou him guide!
2.  GOD turn us ev'ry dream to good! For it is wonder thing, by the Rood,* *Cross <1> To my witte, what causeth swevens,* *dreams Either on morrows or on evens; And why th'effect followeth of some, And of some it shall never come; Why this is an avision And this a revelation; Why this a dream, why that a sweven, And not to ev'ry man *like even;* *alike* Why this a phantom, why these oracles, I n'ot; but whoso of these miracles The causes knoweth bet than I, Divine* he; for I certainly *define *Ne can them not,* nor ever think *do not know them* To busy my wit for to swink* *labour To know of their significance The genders, neither the distance Of times of them, nor the causes For why that this more than that cause is; Or if folke's complexions Make them dream of reflections; Or elles thus, as others sayn, For too great feebleness of the brain By abstinence, or by sickness, By prison, strife, or great distress, Or elles by disordinance* *derangement Of natural accustomance;* *mode of life That some men be too curious In study, or melancholious, Or thus, so inly full of dread, That no man may them *boote bede;* *afford them relief* Or elles that devotion Of some, and contemplation, Causeth to them such dreames oft; Or that the cruel life unsoft Of them that unkind loves lead, That often hope much or dread, That purely their impressions Cause them to have visions; Or if that spirits have the might To make folk to dream a-night; Or if the soul, of *proper kind,* *its own nature* Be so perfect as men find, That it forewot* what is to come, *foreknows And that it warneth all and some Of ev'reach of their adventures, By visions, or by figures, But that our fleshe hath no might To understanden it aright, For it is warned too darkly; But why the cause is, not wot I. Well worth of this thing greate clerks, <2> That treat of this and other works; For I of none opinion Will as now make mention; But only that the holy Rood Turn us every dream to good. For never since that I was born, Nor no man elles me beforn, Mette,* as I trowe steadfastly, *dreamed So wonderful a dream as I, The tenthe day now of December; The which, as I can it remember, I will you tellen ev'ry deal.* *whit
3.  That is to say, the *fowles of ravine* *birds of prey* Were highest set, and then the fowles smale, That eaten as them Nature would incline; As worme-fowl, of which I tell no tale; But waterfowl sat lowest in the dale, And fowls that live by seed sat on the green, And that so many, that wonder was to see'n.
4.  "I say not therefore that I will you love; *Nor say not nay;* but, in conclusioun, *nor say I that I meane well, by God that sits above!" I will not* And therewithal she cast her eyen down, And gan to sigh, and said; "O Troye town! Yet bid* I God, in quiet and in rest *pray I may you see, or *do my hearte brest!"* *cause my heart to break*
5.   An elf-queen will I love, y-wis,* *assuredly For in this world no woman is Worthy to be my make* *mate In town; All other women I forsake, And to an elf-queen I me take By dale and eke by down." <14>
6.  O worthy PETRO, King of CYPRE <30> also, That Alexandre won by high mast'ry, Full many a heathnen wroughtest thou full woe, Of which thine owen lieges had envy; And, for no thing but for thy chivalry, They in thy bed have slain thee by the morrow; Thus can Fortune her wheel govern and gie,* *guide And out of joy bringe men into sorrow.

应用

1.  11. Catapuce: spurge; a plant of purgative qualities. To its name in the text correspond the Italian "catapuzza," and French "catapuce" -- words the origin of which is connected with the effects of the plant.
2.  I thanked her, and was right *well apaid:* *satisfied "Yea," quoth she, "and be thou not dismay'd, Though thou have heard the cuckoo *erst than* me; <6> *before For, if I live, it shall amended be The next May, if I be not afraid.
3.  And for those water-fowles then began The goose to speak. and in her cackeling She saide, "Peace, now! take keep* ev'ry man, *heed And hearken what reason I shall forth bring; My wit is sharp, I love no tarrying; I say I rede him, though he were my brother, But* she will love him, let him love another!" *unless
4、  It were full hard by order for to sayn How many wonders Jesus for them wrought, But at the last, to telle short and plain, The sergeants of the town of Rome them sought, And them before Almach the Prefect brought, Which them apposed,* and knew all their intent, *questioned And to th'image of Jupiter them sent.
5、  He wooed her, but it availed nought; She woulde do no sinne by no way: And for despite, he compassed his thought To make her a shameful death to dey;* *die He waiteth when the Constable is away, And privily upon a night he crept In Hermegilda's chamber while she slept.

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网友评论(xyhmMEkg62032))

  • 罗国金 08-08

      30. All the mark of Adam: all who bear the mark of Adam i.e. all men.

  • 阿特托 08-08

      39. Cythere: Cytherea -- Venus, so called from the name of the island, Cythera, into which her worship was first introduced from Phoenicia.

  • 赫维留斯 08-08

       4. Yet in our ashes cold does fire reek: "ev'n in our ashes live their wonted fires."

  • 万武生 08-08

      13. fele: many; German, "viele."

  • 王敏琳 08-07

    {  Another tercel eagle spake anon, Of lower kind, and said that should not be; "I love her better than ye do, by Saint John! Or at the least I love her as well as ye, And longer have her serv'd in my degree; And if she should have lov'd for long loving, To me alone had been the guerdoning.* *reward

  • 何桂芳 08-06

      19. The famous Knights of King Arthur, who, being all esteemed equal in valour and noble qualities, sat at a round table, so that none should seem to have precedence over the rest.}

  • 普拉亚德尔卡曼 08-06

      Whilom* there was dwelling in my country *once on a time An archdeacon, a man of high degree, That boldely did execution, In punishing of fornication, Of witchecraft, and eke of bawdery, Of defamation, and adultery, Of churche-reeves,* and of testaments, *churchwardens Of contracts, and of lack of sacraments, And eke of many another manner* crime, *sort of Which needeth not rehearsen at this time, Of usury, and simony also; But, certes, lechours did he greatest woe; They shoulde singen, if that they were hent;* *caught And smale tithers<1> were foul y-shent,* *troubled, put to shame If any person would on them complain; There might astert them no pecunial pain.<2> For smalle tithes, and small offering, He made the people piteously to sing; For ere the bishop caught them with his crook, They weren in the archedeacon's book; Then had he, through his jurisdiction, Power to do on them correction.

  • 王瑞锋 08-06

      49. To be "in the wind" of noisy magpies, or other birds that might spoil sport by alarming the game, was not less desirable than to be on the "lee-side" of the game itself, that the hunter's presence might not be betrayed by the scent. "In the wind of," thus signifies not to windward of, but to leeward of -- that is, in the wind that comes from the object of pursuit.

  • 昌新路 08-05

       I am so shaken with the fevers white, Of all this May sleep I but lite;* *little And also it is not like* unto me *pleasing That any hearte shoulde sleepy be, In whom that Love his fiery dart will smite,

  • 张斯轩 08-03

    {  And as I with the cuckoo thus gan chide, I heard, in the next bush beside, A nightingale so lustily sing, That her clear voice she made ring Through all the greenwood wide.

  • 李云鹤 08-03

      17. Gramercy: "grand merci," French; great thanks.

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