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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:吴旭君 大小:ZkWJl0DX74800KB 下载:7tWAnqat39917次
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日期:2020-08-07 09:40:47
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  With these words he sat down, and Mentor who had been a friend ofUlysses, and had been left in charge of everything with full authorityover the servants, rose to speak. He, then, plainly and in all honestyaddressed them thus:
2.  Thus he chided with his heart, and checked it into endurance, but hetossed about as one who turns a paunch full of blood and fat infront of a hot fire, doing it first on one side and then on the other,that he may get it cooked as soon as possible, even so did he turnhimself about from side to side, thinking all the time how, singlehanded as he was, he should contrive to kill so large a body of men asthe wicked suitors. But by and by Minerva came down from heaven in thelikeness of a woman, and hovered over his head saying, "My poorunhappy man, why do you lie awake in this way? This is your house:your wife is safe inside it, and so is your son who is just such ayoung man as any father may be proud of."
3.  "Son of Atreus," replied Telemachus, "do not press me to staylonger; I should be contented to remain with you for another twelvemonths; I find your conversation so delightful that I should neveronce wish myself at home with my parents; but my crew whom I have leftat Pylos are already impatient, and you are detaining me from them. Asfor any present you may be disposed to make me, I had rather that itshould he a piece of plate. I will take no horses back with me toIthaca, but will leave them to adorn your own stables, for you havemuch flat ground in your kingdom where lotus thrives, as alsomeadowsweet and wheat and barley, and oats with their white andspreading ears; whereas in Ithaca we have neither open fields norracecourses, and the country is more fit for goats than horses, andI like it the better for that. None of our islands have much levelground, suitable for horses, and Ithaca least of all."
4.  "We are speaking god and goddess to one another, one another, andyou ask me why I have come here, and I will tell you truly as youwould have me do. Jove sent me; it was no doing of mine; who couldpossibly want to come all this way over the sea where there are nocities full of people to offer me sacrifices or choice hecatombs?Nevertheless I had to come, for none of us other gods can crossJove, nor transgress his orders. He says that you have here the mostill-starred of alf those who fought nine years before the city of KingPriam and sailed home in the tenth year after having sacked it. Ontheir way home they sinned against Minerva, who raised both wind andwaves against them, so that all his brave companions perished, andhe alone was carried hither by wind and tide. Jove says that you areto let this by man go at once, for it is decreed that he shall notperish here, far from his own people, but shall return to his houseand country and see his friends again."
5.  To this Telemachus answered, "By Jove, Agelaus, and by the sorrowsof my unhappy father, who has either perished far from Ithaca, or iswandering in some distant land, I throw no obstacles in the way ofmy mother's marriage; on the contrary I urge her to choosewhomsoever she will, and I will give her numberless gifts into thebargain, but I dare not insist point blank that she shall leave thehouse against her own wishes. Heaven forbid that I should do this."
6.  They were astounded when they heard this, for they had made surethat Telemachus had not gone to the city of Neleus. They thought hewas only away somewhere on the farms, and was with the sheep, orwith the swineherd; so Antinous said, "When did he go? Tell metruly, and what young men did he take with him? Were they freemen orhis own bondsmen- for he might manage that too? Tell me also, didyou let him have the ship of your own free will because he askedyou, or did he take it without yourleave?"

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1.  "I was not there," answered Euryclea, "and do not know; I only heardthem groaning while they were being killed. We sat crouching andhuddled up in a corner of the women's room with the doors closed, tillyour son came to fetch me because his father sent him. Then I foundUlysses standing over the corpses that were lying on the ground allround him, one on top of the other. You would have enjoyed it if youcould have seen him standing there all bespattered with blood andfilth, and looking just like a lion. But the corpses are now all piledup in the gatehouse that is in the outer court, and Ulysses has lita great fire to purify the house with sulphur. He has sent me tocall you, so come with me that you may both be happy together afterall; for now at last the desire of your heart has been fulfilled; yourhusband is come home to find both wife and son alive and well, andto take his revenge in his own house on the suitors who behaved sobadly to him."
2.  Then Telemachus spoke, "Shameless," he cried, "and insolent suitors,let us feast at our pleasure now, and let there be no brawling, for itis a rare thing to hear a man with such a divine voice as Phemius has;but in the morning meet me in full assembly that I may give you formalnotice to depart, and feast at one another's houses, turn and turnabout, at your own cost. If on the other hand you choose to persist inspunging upon one man, heaven help me, but Jove shall reckon withyou in full, and when you fall in my father's house there shall beno man to avenge you."
3.  Ulysses answered, "May King Jove grant all happiness toTelemachus, and fulfil the desire of his heart."
4.  Then Penelope sprang up from her couch, threw her arms roundEuryclea, and wept for joy. "But my dear nurse," said she, "explainthis to me; if he has really come home as you say, how did he manageto overcome the wicked suitors single handed, seeing what a numberof them there always were?"
5.  NOW when the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared,Telemachus rose and dressed himself. He bound his sandals on to hiscomely feet, girded his sword about his shoulder, and left his roomlooking like an immortal god. He at once sent the criers round to callthe people in assembly, so they called them and the people gatheredthereon; then, when they were got together, he went to the place ofassembly spear in hand- not alone, for his two hounds went with him.Minerva endowed him with a presence of such divine comeliness that allmarvelled at him as he went by, and when he took his place' in hisfather's seat even the oldest councillors made way for him.
6.  "'And I will tell you of all the wicked witchcraft that Circe willtry to practise upon you. She will mix a mess for you to drink, andshe will drug the meal with which she makes it, but she will not beable to charm you, for the virtue of the herb that I shall give youwill prevent her spells from working. I will tell you all about it.When Circe strikes you with her wand, draw your sword and springupon her as though you were goings to kill her. She will then befrightened and will desire you to go to bed with her; on this you mustnot point blank refuse her, for you want her to set your companionsfree, and to take good care also of yourself, but you make her swearsolemnly by all the blessed that she will plot no further mischiefagainst you, or else when she has got you naked she will unman you andmake you fit for nothing.'

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1.  While Ulysses was thus yielding himself to a very deep slumberthat eased the burden of his sorrows, his admirable wife awoke, andsitting up in her bed began to cry. When she had relieved herself byweeping she prayed to Diana saying, "Great Goddess Diana, daughterof Jove, drive an arrow into my heart and slay me; or let somewhirlwind snatch me up and bear me through paths of darkness till itdrop me into the mouths of overflowing Oceanus, as it did thedaughters of Pandareus. The daughters of Pandareus lost their fatherand mother, for the gods killed them, so they were left orphans. ButVenus took care of them, and fed them on cheese, honey, and sweetwine. Juno taught them to excel all women in beauty of form andunderstanding; Diana gave them an imposing presence, and Minervaendowed them with every kind of accomplishment; but one day when Venushad gone up to Olympus to see Jove about getting them married (forwell does he know both what shall happen and what not happen toevery one) the storm winds came and spirited them away to becomehandmaids to the dread Erinyes. Even so I wish that the gods wholive in heaven would hide me from mortal sight, or that fair Dianamight strike me, for I would fain go even beneath the sad earth if Imight do so still looking towards Ulysses only, and without havingto yield myself to a worse man than he was. Besides, no matter howmuch people may grieve by day, they can put up with it so long as theycan sleep at night, for when the eyes are closed in slumber peopleforget good and ill alike; whereas my misery haunts me even in mydreams. This very night methought there was one lying by my side whowas like Ulysses as he was when he went away with his host, and Irejoiced, for I believed that it was no dream, but the very truthitself."
2.  "Eumaeus, and all of you, to-morrow I want to go away and beginbegging about the town, so as to be no more trouble to you or toyour men. Give me your advice therefore, and let me have a goodguide to go with me and show me the way. I will go the round of thecity begging as I needs must, to see if any one will give me a drinkand a piece of bread. I should like also to go to the house of Ulyssesand bring news of her husband to queen Penelope. I could then go aboutamong the suitors and see if out of all their abundance they will giveme a dinner. I should soon make them an excellent servant in all sortsof ways. Listen and believe when I tell you that by the blessing ofMercury who gives grace and good name to the works of all men, thereis no one living who would make a more handy servant than I should- toput fresh wood on the fire, chop fuel, carve, cook, pour out wine, anddo all those services that poor men have to do for their betters."
3.  Eurymachus was furious at all this. He scowled at him and cried,"You wretch, I will soon pay you out for daring to say such thingsto me, and in public too. Has the wine been getting into your heador do you always babble in this way? You seem to have lost your witsbecause you beat the tramp Irus. With this he caught hold of afootstool, but Ulysses sought protection at the knees of Amphinomus ofDulichium, for he was afraid. The stool hit the cupbearer on his righthand and knocked him down: the man fell with a cry flat on his back,and his wine-jug fell ringing to the ground. The suitors in thecovered cloister were now in an uproar, and one would turn towards hisneighbour, saying, "I wish the stranger had gone somewhere else, badluck to hide, for all the trouble he gives us. We cannot permit suchdisturbance about a beggar; if such ill counsels are to prevail weshall have no more pleasure at our banquet."
4.  When he was in this plight, Ino daughter of Cadmus, also calledLeucothea, saw him. She had formerly been a mere mortal, but hadbeen since raised to the rank of a marine goddess. Seeing in whatgreat distress Ulysses now was, she had compassion upon him, and,rising like a sea-gull from the waves, took her seat upon the raft.
5.   Then the dear old nurse Euryclea said, "You may kill me, Madam, orlet me live on in your house, whichever you please, but I will tellyou the real truth. I knew all about it, and gave him everything hewanted in the way of bread and wine, but he made me take my solemnoath that I would not tell you anything for some ten or twelve days,unless you asked or happened to hear of his having gone, for he didnot want you to spoil your beauty by crying. And now, Madam, wash yourface, change your dress, and go upstairs with your maids to offerprayers to Minerva, daughter of Aegis-bearing Jove, for she can savehim even though he be in the jaws of death. Do not trouble Laertes: hehas trouble enough already. Besides, I cannot think that the gods hatedie race of the race of the son of Arceisius so much, but there willbe a son left to come up after him, and inherit both the house and thefair fields that lie far all round it."
6.  Telemachus said, "I will answer you quite truly. I am from Ithaca,and my father is 'Ulysses, as surely as that he ever lived. But he hascome to some miserable end. Therefore I have taken this ship and gotmy crew together to see if I can hear any news of him, for he has beenaway a long time."

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1.  On this he put the bow down, letting it lean against the door,with the arrow standing against the tip of the bow. Then he took hisseat again on the seat from which he had risen; and Antinous rebukedhim saying:
2.  "We are speaking god and goddess to one another, one another, andyou ask me why I have come here, and I will tell you truly as youwould have me do. Jove sent me; it was no doing of mine; who couldpossibly want to come all this way over the sea where there are nocities full of people to offer me sacrifices or choice hecatombs?Nevertheless I had to come, for none of us other gods can crossJove, nor transgress his orders. He says that you have here the mostill-starred of alf those who fought nine years before the city of KingPriam and sailed home in the tenth year after having sacked it. Ontheir way home they sinned against Minerva, who raised both wind andwaves against them, so that all his brave companions perished, andhe alone was carried hither by wind and tide. Jove says that you areto let this by man go at once, for it is decreed that he shall notperish here, far from his own people, but shall return to his houseand country and see his friends again."
3.  Telemachus took this speech as of good omen and rose at once, for hewas bursting with what he had to say. He stood in the middle of theassembly and the good herald Pisenor brought him his staff. Then,turning to Aegyptius, "Sir," said he, "it is I, as you will shortlylearn, who have convened you, for it is I who am the most aggrieved. Ihave not got wind of any host approaching about which I would warnyou, nor is there any matter of public moment on which I wouldspeak. My grieveance is purely personal, and turns on two greatmisfortunes which have fallen upon my house. The first of these is theloss of my excellent father, who was chief among all you here present,and was like a father to every one of you; the second is much moreserious, and ere long will be the utter ruin of my estate. The sons ofall the chief men among you are pestering my mother to marry themagainst her will. They are afraid to go to her father Icarius,asking him to choose the one he likes best, and to provide marriagegifts for his daughter, but day by day they keep hanging about myfather's house, sacrificing our oxen, sheep, and fat goats for theirbanquets, and never giving so much as a thought to the quantity ofwine they drink. No estate can stand such recklessness; we have now noUlysses to ward off harm from our doors, and I cannot hold my ownagainst them. I shall never all my days be as good a man as he was,still I would indeed defend myself if I had power to do so, for Icannot stand such treatment any longer; my house is being disgracedand ruined. Have respect, therefore, to your own consciences and topublic opinion. Fear, too, the wrath of heaven, lest the gods shouldbe displeased and turn upon you. I pray you by Jove and Themis, who isthe beginning and the end of councils, [do not] hold back, my friends,and leave me singlehanded- unless it be that my brave father Ulyssesdid some wrong to the Achaeans which you would now avenge on me, byaiding and abetting these suitors. Moreover, if I am to be eaten outof house and home at all, I had rather you did the eatingyourselves, for I could then take action against you to somepurpose, and serve you with notices from house to house till I gotpaid in full, whereas now I have no remedy."
4、  Pontonous then mixed wine and water, and handed it round aftergiving every man his drink-offering. When they had made theirofferings, and had drunk each as much as he was minded, Alcinous said:
5、  "And I said, 'Agamemnon, why do you ask me? I do not know whetheryour son is alive or dead, and it is not right to talk when one doesnot know.'

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  • 刘汉林 08-06

      BUT Minerva went to the fair city of Lacedaemon to tell Ulysses' sonthat he was to return at once. She found him and Pisistratussleeping in the forecourt of Menelaus's house; Pisistratus was fastasleep, but Telemachus could get no rest all night for thinking of hisunhappy father, so Minerva went close up to him and said:

  • 杰尔巴 08-06

      "I too, my son," said she, "have something for you as a keepsakefrom the hand of Helen; it is for your bride to wear upon herwedding day. Till then, get your dear mother to keep it for you;thus may you go back rejoicing to your own country and to your home."

  • 仇富 08-06

       As he thus prayed, Minerva came close up to him in the likenessand with the voice of Mentor. "Telemachus," said she, "if you are madeof the same stuff as your father you will be neither fool nor cowardhenceforward, for Ulysses never broke his word nor left his workhalf done. If, then, you take after him, your voyage will not befruitless, but unless you have the blood of Ulysses and of Penelope inyour veins I see no likelihood of your succeeding. Sons are seldomas good men as their fathers; they are generally worse, not better;still, as you are not going to be either fool or cowardhenceforward, and are not entirely without some share of your father'swise discernment, I look with hope upon your undertaking. But mind younever make common cause with any of those foolish suitors, for theyhave neither sense nor virtue, and give no thought to death and to thedoom that will shortly fall on one and all of them, so that they shallperish on the same day. As for your voyage, it shall not be longdelayed; your father was such an old friend of mine that I will findyou a ship, and will come with you myself. Now, however, returnhome, and go about among the suitors; begin getting provisions readyfor your voyage; see everything well stowed, the wine in jars, and thebarley meal, which is the staff of life, in leathern bags, while Igo round the town and beat up volunteers at once. There are many shipsin Ithaca both old and new; I will run my eye over them for you andwill choose the best; we will get her ready and will put out to seawithout delay."

  • 彼得·戈麦斯 08-06

      "They all swore as she told them, and when they had completedtheir oath the woman said, 'Hush; and if any of your men meets me inthe street or at the well, do not let him speak to me, for fear someone should go and tell my master, in which case he would suspectsomething. He would put me in prison, and would have all of youmurdered; keep your own counsel therefore; buy your merchandise asfast as you can, and send me word when you have done loading. I willbring as much gold as I can lay my hands on, and there is somethingelse also that I can do towards paying my fare. I am nurse to theson of the good man of the house, a funny little fellow just able torun about. I will carry him off in your ship, and you will get a greatdeal of money for him if you take him and sell him in foreign parts.'

  • 章伯钧 08-05

    {  "Stranger," replied Alcinous, "I am not the kind of man to get angryabout nothing; it is always better to be reasonable; but by FatherJove, Minerva, and Apollo, now that I see what kind of person you are,and how much you think as I do, I wish you would stay here, marry mydaughter, and become my son-in-law. If you will stay I will give you ahouse and an estate, but no one (heaven forbid) shall keep you hereagainst your own wish, and that you may be sure of this I willattend to-morrow to the matter of your escort. You can sleep duringthe whole voyage if you like, and the men shall sail you over smoothwaters either to your own home, or wherever you please, even though itbe a long way further off than Euboea, which those of my people whosaw it when they took yellow-haired Rhadamanthus to see Tityus the sonof Gaia, tell me is the furthest of any place- and yet they did thewhole voyage in a single day without distressing themselves, andcame back again afterwards. You will thus see how much my shipsexcel all others, and what magnificent oarsmen my sailors are."

  • 司晓晨 08-04

      "Be off, old man," he cried, "from the doorway, or you shall bedragged out neck and heels. Do you not see that they are all giving methe wink, and wanting me to turn you out by force, only I do notlike to do so? Get up then, and go of yourself, or we shall come toblows."}

  • 宋峤 08-04

      But all the time he felt sure it was Minerva, and the suitors fromthe other side raised an uproar when they saw her. Agelaus was thefirst to reproach her. "Mentor," he cried, "do not let Ulysses beguileyou into siding with him and fighting the suitors. This is what wewill do: when we have killed these people, father and son, we willkill you too. You shall pay for it with your head, and when we havekilled you, we will take all you have, in doors or out, and bring itinto hotch-pot with Ulysses' property; we will not let your sonslive in your house, nor your daughters, nor shall your widowcontinue to live in the city of Ithaca."

  • 林升飞 08-04

      "My dear wife," replied Menelaus, "I see the likeness just as youdo. His hands and feet are just like Ulysses'; so is his hair, withthe shape of his head and the expression of his eyes. Moreover, when Iwas talking about Ulysses, and saying how much he had suffered on myaccount, tears fell from his eyes, and he hid his face in his mantle."

  • 洛克菲勒 08-03

       Phemius was still singing, and his hearers sat rapt in silence as hetold the sad tale of the return from Troy, and the ills Minerva hadlaid upon the Achaeans. Penelope, daughter of Icarius, heard hissong from her room upstairs, and came down by the great staircase, notalone, but attended by two of her handmaids. When she reached thesuitors she stood by one of the bearing posts that supported theroof of the cloisters with a staid maiden on either side of her. Sheheld a veil, moreover, before her face, and was weeping bitterly.

  • 陈建铭 08-01

    {  On this pale fear seized every one; they were so frightened thattheir arms dropped from their hands and fell upon the ground at thesound of the goddess's voice, and they fled back to the city for theirlives. But Ulysses gave a great cry, and gathering himself togetherswooped down like a soaring eagle. Then the son of Saturn sent athunderbolt of fire that fell just in front of Minerva, so she said toUlysses, "Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, stop this warful strife, orJove will be angry with you."

  • 徐家湾 08-01

      "She came to me one day when I was by myself, as I often was, forthe men used to go with their barbed hooks, all over the island in thehope of catching a fish or two to save them from the pangs ofhunger. 'Stranger,' said she, 'it seems to me that you like starvingin this way- at any rate it does not greatly trouble you, for youstick here day after day, without even trying to get away thoughyour men are dying by inches.'

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