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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:刘敏郑 大小:xe6237aC37363KB 下载:47Ldbn4t62705次
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日期:2020-08-10 02:04:20
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龙长生

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Salabetto amazedly wondering thereat, tooke her in his Armes, andweeping also with her, said. Alas my deare Love, what sodainaccident hath befalne you, to urge this lamentable alteration? Ifyou love me, hide it not from me. After he had of entreated her inthis manner, casting her armes about his necke, and sighing as ifher heart would breake, thus she replyed. Ah Salabetto, the onelyjewell of my joy on earth, I knowe not what to do, or say, for (evennow) I received Letters from Messina, wherein my Brother writes to me,that although it cost the sale of all my goods, or whatsoever else Ihave beside, I must (within eight dayes space) not faile to send him athousand Florins of gold, or else he must have his head smitten off,and I know not by what meanes to procure them so soone. For, if thelimitation of fifteene dayes might serve the turne, I could borrowthem in a place, where I can command a farre greater summe, or elseI would sell some part of our Lands. But beeing no way able tofurnish him so soone, I would I had died before I heard thesedismall tydings. And in the uttering of these words, she graced themwith such cunning dissembled sorrow, as if she had meant truly indeed.Salabetto, in whom the fury of his amorous flames, had consumed agreat part of his necessary understanding, beleeving thesecounterfetted tears and complaints of hers, to proceed from anhonest meaning soule; rashly and foolishly thus replied. DeareBiancafiore, I cannot furnish you with a thousand golden Florines, butam able to lend you five hundred if I were sure of their repaymentat fifteene dayes, wherein you are highly beholding to Fortune, that Ihave made sale of all my Cloathes; which if they had lyen still onmy hand, my power could not stretch to lend you five Florines. Alasdeare heart (quoth she) would you be in such want of money, and hideit from her that loves you so loyally? Why did you not make yourneed knowne to me? Although I am not furnished of a thousand Florines;yet I have alwaies ready three or foure hundred by me, to do any kindeoffice for my friend. In thus wronging me, you have robd me of allboldnes, to presume upon your offer made me. Salabetto, far fasterinveigled by these words then before, said. Let not my folly (brightBiancafiore) cause you to refuse my friendly offer, in such a caseof extreme necessity: I have them ready pre. pared for you, and amheartily sory, that my power cannot furnish you with the whole summe.
2.  THE SECOND DAY, THE FIFT NOVELL
3.  SUBJECT: BUT EVERY ONE REMAINETH AT LIBERTY, TO
4.  I know (for my sake) thou hast given him thy goodly ambling Gelding,and so soone as he is gone, I promise thee upon my word, and by thefaithfull love I beare thee; that I will have further conferencewith thee, and let thee understand somewhat more of my minde. Andbecause this is neither fitting time nor place, to discourse onmatters of such serious moment: observe heereafter, as a signall, whenthou seest my Crimson Skarfe hanging in the window of my Chamber,which is upon the Garden side, that evening (so soone as it isnight) come to the Garden gate, with wary respect that no eye dodiscover thee, and there thou shalt finde me walking, and ready toacquaint thee with other matters, according as I shall finde occasion.
5.  The words contained in this Song, did manifestly declare, whattorturing afflictions poore Philostratus felt, and more (perhaps)had beene perceived by the lookes of the Lady whom he spake of,being then present in the dance; if the sodaine ensuing darknessehad not hid the crimson blush, which mounted up into her face. But theSong being ended, and divers other beside, lasting till the houre ofrest drew on; by command of the Queene, they all repaired to theirChambers.
6.  Love, I found such felicity, etc.

计划指导

1.  The Lord Abbot being a very wise man, and his angry distemper moremoderately qualified; revealed whither he went, and the cause of hisgoing thither. Which when Ghinotto had heard, hee departed courteouslyfrom him, and began to consider with himselfe, how he might cure theAbbot; yet without any Bathe. So, commanding a good fire to be keptcontinually in his small Chamber, and very good attendance on him: thenext morning, he came to visite him againe, bringing a faire whiteNapkin on his arme, and in it two slices or toasts of fine Manchet,a goodly cleare Glasse, full of the purest white-Bastard ofCorniglia (but indeed, of the Abbots owne provision brought thitherwith him) and then hee spoke to him in this manner.
2.  THE NINTH DAY, THE SIXT NOVELL
3.  But before you proceede to pronounce any sentence, may it please youto favour me with one small request, namely, that you would demandof my Husband, if at all times, and whensoever he tooke delight inmy company, I ever made any curiosity, or came to him unwillingly.Whereto Rinaldo, without tarrying for the Potestate to moove thequestion, sodainly answered; that (undoubtedly) his wife at all times,and oftner then he could request it, was never sparing of herkindnesse, or put him off with any deniall. Then the Lady,continuing on her former speeches, thus replyed. Let me then demand ofyou my Lord, being our Potestate and Judge, if it be so, by myHusbands owne free confession, that he hath alwaies had his pleasureof me, without the least refusall in me, or contradiction; what shouldI doe with the over-plus remaining in mine owne power, and whereofhe had no need? Would you have mee cast it away to the Dogges? Wasit not more fitting for me, to pleasure therwith a worthy Gentleman,who was even at deaths doore for my love, then (my husbandssurfetting, and having no neede of me) to let him lye languishing, anddye?
4.  Now was Andrea so confounded this extremity of courtesie, that heknew not what to say, but onely thus replied. I love you as a Sisterought to be loved, and accept of your exceeding kindnesse: but if Ireturne not to my lodging, I shall wrong mine Host and his gueststoo much, because they will not sup untill I come. For that (quothshee) we have a present remedy, one of my servants shall goe andgive warning, whereby they shall not tarry your comming. Albeit, youmight doe me a great kindnesse, to send for your friends to sup withus here, where I assure ye, they shall finde that your Sister (foryour sake) will bid them welcome, and after supper, you may allwalke together to your Inne. Andrea answered, that he had no suchfriends there, as should be so burthenous to her: but seeing she urgedhim so farre, he would stay to sup with her, and referred himselfesolely to her disposition.
5.  Wherefore, young ladies, I beseech you if you would deserve Heaven'sgrace, lend yourselves to the putting of the Devil in Hell; for itis a thing beloved of God, pleasing to the participants, and onefrom which much good comes and ensues.
6.  Brother, answered Reynard, you have a better breath then I, and yoursuccesse hath prooved happier then mine, for before the arrivall of myGossip Credulano, I could accomplish but two jaculatory prayers onely.But it appeareth, that we have both prevailed in our devout desire,because the childe is perfectly cured. Credulano calling for Wineand good cheare, feasted both the Friars very jocondly, and thenconducting them forth of his house, without any furtherintermission, caused the childs Image of waxe to be made, and sentit to be placed on the Altar of Saint Frances, among many other thelike oblations.

推荐功能

1.  The Father and Mother, much dismayed and displeased at this haplesseaccident, applying her with continuall comforts, Phisicke, and thebest skill remayning in all the Phisitions, sought all possible meaneswayes to give her succour: but all proved to no effect, because inregard of her choyce (which could sort to none other then adesperate end) she was desirous to live no longer. Now it fortuned,that her parents offering her whatsoever remained in their power toperforme, a sudden apprehension entred her minde, to wit, that (ifit might possible be done) before she dyed, she would first have theKing to know, in what manner she stood affected to him. Wherefore, oneday she entreated her Father that a Gentleman, named Manutio deArezza, might be permitted to come see her. This Manutio was (in thosetimes) held to be a most excellent Musitian, both for his voyce insinging, and exquisite skill in playing on Instruments, for which hewas highly in favour with King Piero, who made (almost) daily use ofhim, to heare him both sing and play.
2.  FROM PERILL
3.  Can never sute it selfe with my desire.
4.  On the morrow, carrying his Gitterne thither with him, to the nolittle delight of his companions, hee both played and sung a wholeBed-role of himselfe to any worke all the day: but loiteringfantastically, one while he gazed out at the window, then ran to thegate, and oftentimes downe into the Court onely to have a sight of hisMistresse. She also (as cunningly) encountred all his ollies, bysuch directions as Bruno gave her, and many more beside of her ownedevising, to quicken him still with new occasions: Bruno plaid theAmbassador betweene them, in delivering the messages fromCalandrino, and then returning her answers to him. Sometimes whenshe was absent thence (which often hapned as occasions called her)then he would write letters in her name, and bring them, as if theywere sent by her, to give him hope of what hee desired, but becauseshe was then among her kindred, yet she could not be unmindfull ofhim.
5.   It is no long time since, that there lived in Genes or Geneway, aGentleman named Signior Herminio de Grimaldo, who (as every one welknew) was more rich in inheritances, and ready summes of currant moneythen any other knowne Citizen in Italy. And as hee surpassed other menin wealth, so did he likewise excell them in wretched Avarice, beingso miserably greedy and covetous, as no man in the world could be morewicked that way; because, not onely he kept his purse lockt up frompleasuring any, but denied needfull things to himselfe, enduringmany miseries onely to avoid expences, contrary to the Genewayesgenerall custom, who alwayes delighted to be decently cloathed, and tohave their dyet of the best. By reason of which most miserablebasenesse, they tooke away from him the Sirname of Grimaldi, whereofhe was in right descended, and called him master Herminio the covetousMizer, a nickname very notably agreeing with his gripple nature.
6.  Faire Ladies, it were an heavy burthen imposed on me, and a mattermuch surmounting my capacity, if I should vainely imagine, tocontent you with so pleasing a Novell, as those have already done,by you so singularly reported: neverthelesse, I must discharge mydutie, and take my fortune as it fals, albeit I hope to finde youmercifull.

应用

1.  The ridiculous words given by Calandrino to his Wife, all thewhole company hartily laughed at: but a Philostratus ceassing,Madame Neiphila (as it pleased the Queene to appoint) began tospeake thus. Vertuous Ladies, if it were not more hard and uneasie formen, to make good their understanding and vertue, then apparantpublication of their disgrace and folly; many would not labour invaine, to curbe in their idle speeches with a bridle, as you havemanifestly observed by the weake wit of Calandrino. Who needed no suchfantastick circumstance, to cure the strange disease, which heimagined (by sottish perswasions) to have: had hee not been solavish of his tongue, and accused his Wife of overmastering him. Whichmaketh me remember a Novell, quite contrary to this last related,namely, how one man may strive to surmount another in malice; yet heto sustaine the greater harme, that had (at the first) the mostadvantage of his enemy, as I will presently declare unto you.
2.  THE FIFT DAY, THE EIGHTH NOVELL
3.  This seemed a happy opportunity to Manutio, to sing the dittie sopurposely done and devised: which hee delivered in such excellentmanner, the voice and Instrument concording so extraordinary pleasing;that all the persons then in the Presence, seemed rather Statues, thenliving men, so strangely they were wrapt with admiration, and the Kinghimselfe farre beyond all the rest, transported with a rare kinde ofalteration.
4、  Calandrino stampt and fretted exceedingly, saying: As I am a trueman to God, my Prince, and Countrey, I tell thee truly, that my Brawneis stolne. Say so still I bid thee (answered Bruno) and let all theworld beleeve thee, if they list to do so, for I will not. Wouldstthou (quoth Calandrino) have me damne my selfe to the divell? I seethou dost not credit what I say: but would I were hanged by the necke,if it be not true, that my Brawne is stolne. How can it possible be,replyed Bruno? Did not I see it in thy house yesternight? Wouldst thouhave me beleeve, that it is flowne away? Although it is not flowneaway (quoth Calandrino) yet I am certain, that it is stolne away:for which I am weary of my life, because I dare not go home to mineowne house, in regard my wife will never beleeve it; and yet if sheshould credite it, we are sure to have no peace for a twelve monthsspace.
5、  Titus tooke home with him his friend Gisippus, and after he hadsharpely reproved him for his distrust, and cold credence of hisfriendship: he brought him to Sophronia, who welcomed him as lovingly,as if he had bin her naturall borne brother, bemoaning his hard anddisastrous fortune, and taking especiall care, to convert all passeddistresses, into as happy and comfortable a change, fitting him withgarments and attendants, beseeming his degree both in Nobility andvertue. Titus, out of his honourable bounty, imparted halfe hislands and rich possessions to him, and afterward gave him in marriage,his owne Sister, a most beautifull Lady, named Fulvia, saying to himbeside. My deare friend Gisippus, it remaineth now in thine owneelection, whether thou wilt live here still with me, or returnebacke to Athens, with all the wealth which I have bestowed on thee.But Gisippus, being one way constrayned, by the sentence of banishmentfrom his native City, and then againe, in regard of the constant love,which he bare to so true and thankefull friend as Titus was: concludedto live there as a loyall Roman, where he with his Fulvia, and Tituswith his faire Sophronia, lived long after together in one and thesame house, augmenting daily (if possible it might be) their amitybeyond all other equalizing.

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  • 林婷 08-09

      Rinaldo de Este, after hee was robbed by Theeves, arrived atChasteau Guillaume, where he was friendly lodged by a faire Widdow,and recompenced likewise for all his losses; returning afterwardsafe and well home unto his owne house.

  • 廖昕 08-09

      Ferando looking leane and pale, as one, that in so long time haddenot seene the light of heaven, and endured such strict disciplinetwice every day: stood in a gastly amazement by the Tombesside, as notdaring to adventure any further, or knowing perfectly, whether hewas (as yet) truly alive, or no. But when he saw the Monkes andAbbot comming, with their lighted Torches, and singing in a solemnemanner of Procession, he humbled himselfe at the Abbots feete, saying.Holy Father, by your zealous prayers (as hath bin miraculouslyrevealed to me) and the prayers of blessed S. Bennet; as also of myhonest, deare, and loving Wife, I have bin delivered from the painesof Purgatory, and brought againe to live in this world; for whichunspeakable grace and favour, most humbly I thanke the well-pleasedFates, S. Bennet, your Father-hood, and my kinde Wife, and willremember all your loves to me for ever. Blessed be the Fates, answeredthe Abbot, for working so great a wonder heere in our Monastery. Gothen my good Son, seeing the Fates have bin so gracious to thee; Go (Isay) home to thine owne house, and comfort thy kind wife, who eversince thy departure out of this life, hath lived in continuallmourning, love, cherish, and make much of her, never afflicting herhenceforth with causlesse jealousie. No I warrant you good Father,replyed Ferando; I have bin well whipt in Purgatory for such folly,and therefore I might be called a starke foole, if I should that wayoffend any more, either my loving wife, or any other.

  • 卢贻斌 08-09

       The Fryars Boy, whom some called Guccio Balena, some Guccio Imbrata,and others Guccio Porco, was such a knavish Lad, and had so many badqualities, as Lippo Topo the cunning Painter, or the most curiousPoeticall wit, had not any ability to describe them. Friar Onyonhimself did often observe his behaviour, and would make this reportamong his Friends. My Boy (quoth he) hath nine rare qualities inhim, and such they are, as if Salomon, Aristotle, or Seneca hadonely but one of them: it were sufficient to torment and trouble alltheir vertue, all their senses, and all their sanctity. Consider then,what manner of man he is like to be, having nine such rarities, yetvoide of all vertue, wit, or goodnes. And when it was demaunded ofFriar Onyon, what these nine rare conditions were: hee having them allreadie by heart, and in rime, thus answered.

  • 本·金斯利 08-09

      THE SEVENTH DAY, THE FIRST NOVELL

  • 黄汉 08-08

    {  Afterward, they waited on her into the Hall againe, being their trueSoveraigne Lady and Mistresse, as she was no lesse in her poorestGarments; where all rejoycing for the new restored Mother, and happyrecovery of so noble a son and daughter, the Festivall continuedmany months after. Now every one thought the Marquesse to be a nobleand wise Prince, though somewhat sharpe and unsufferable, in thesevere experiences made of his wife: but (above al) they reputedGrizelda, to be a most wise, patient, and vertuous Lady. The Countof Panago, within few daies after returned backe to Bologna; and theLord Marques, fetching home old Janiculo from his country drudgery, tolive with him (as his Father in law) in his Princely Palace, gavehim honorable maintenance, wherein hee long continued, and ended hisdaies. Afterward, he matched his daughter in a Noble marriage: heand Grizelda living a long time together, in the highest honor thatpossibly could be.

  • 邓海建 08-07

      The Lady hearing these words, gave very setled beleefe to them,imagining unfainedly, that shee had (more then halfe) recovered herfriend already, and held him embraced between her armes: in whichjocond perswasion, the chearful blood mounted up into hir cheekes, andthus she replyed.}

  • 霍德明 08-07

      Alas honest Buffalmaco, answered the Physitian, thou art not halfeacquainted with me as yet: because I walke with gloves upon myhands, and in a long Gowne, thou perhappes doest imagine mee afaint-hearted fellow. If thou didst know, what I have heeretofore doneat Bologna in the night time, when I and my Consorts went to visitepretty wenches, thou wouldst wonder at my couragious attempts. As I ama Gentleman, one night, we met with a young Bona Roba, a paltrygreene-sicknesse baggage, scarsely above a Cubite in height, andbecause she refused to go with us willingly, I gave her a kicke on thebum, and spurnde her more then a Crosse-bowe shoote in distance fromme, and made her walke with us whether she would, or no. Anothertime I remember, when having no other company but my boy, I wentthorow the Churchyard of the Fryars Minors, after the sounding ofAve Maria: a woman hadde beene buried there the very same day, and yetI was not a jotte affraid.

  • 李浩源 08-07

      Alibech turns hermit, and a monk, Rustico, teaches her to put theDevil in Hell. Afterwards she is brought home, and married toNeerbale.

  • 刘正琛 08-06

       There dwelt sometime in Florence, and in the street of SaintBrancazio, a woollen Weaver, named John of Lorrayne; a man morehappy in his Art, then wise in any thing else beside: because,savouring somewhat of the Gregorie, and (in very deede)

  • 刘东才 08-04

    {  I make my moane to thee, and do not fable,

  • 仇振 08-04

      Gisippus lifting up his eyes, and perceiving it was Titus, conceivedimmediately, that he had done this onely for his deliverance, as onethat remembred him sufficiently, and would not be ungratefull forformer kindnesses received. Wherefore, the teares flowing abundantlydown his cheekes, he said to the Judge Varro, it was none but I thatmurdered the man, wherefore, I commiserate the case of this NobleGentleman Titus, who speakes now too late for the safety of my life.Titus on the other side, said. Noble Praetor, this man (as thou seest)is a stranger heere, and was found without any weapon, fast asleepe bythe dead body: thou mayst then easily perceive, that meerely themiserable condition wherein he is, hath made him desperate, and hewould make mine offence the occasion of his death. Absolve him, andsend me to the Crosse, for none but I have deserved to die for thisfact.

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