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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:孙建发 大小:Nth8vFpA42829KB 下载:r9HAihRT56175次
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日期:2020-08-07 18:12:46
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "I will tell you the truth, my son," replied Ulysses. "It was thePhaeacians who brought me here. They are great sailors, and are in thehabit of giving escorts to any one who reaches their coasts. They tookme over the sea while I was fast asleep, and landed me in Ithaca,after giving me many presents in bronze, gold, and raiment. Thesethings by heaven's mercy are lying concealed in a cave, and I am nowcome here on the suggestion of Minerva that we may consult aboutkilling our enemies. First, therefore, give me a list of thesuitors, with their number, that I may learn who, and how many, theyare. I can then turn the matter over in my mind, and see whether wetwo can fight the whole body of them ourselves, or whether we mustfind others to help us."
2.  "I will tell you truly," answered Nestor, "and indeed you haveyourself divined how it all happened. If Menelaus when he got backfrom Troy had found Aegisthus still alive in his house, there wouldhave been no barrow heaped up for him, not even when he was dead,but he would have been thrown outside the city to dogs and vultures,and not a woman would have mourned him, for he had done a deed ofgreat wickedness; but we were over there, fighting hard at Troy, andAegisthus who was taking his ease quietly in the heart of Argos,cajoled Agamemnon's wife Clytemnestra with incessant flattery.
3.  "On this he groaned, and cried out, 'Alas, alas, then the oldprophecy about me is coming true. There was a prophet here, at onetime, a man both brave and of great stature, Telemus son of Eurymus,who was an excellent seer, and did all the prophesying for theCyclopes till he grew old; he told me that all this would happen to mesome day, and said I should lose my sight by the hand of Ulysses. Ihave been all along expecting some one of imposing presence andsuperhuman strength, whereas he turns out to be a little insignificantweakling, who has managed to blind my eye by taking advantage of me inmy drink; come here, then, Ulysses, that I may make you presents toshow my hospitality, and urge Neptune to help you forward on yourjourney- for Neptune and I are father and son. He, if he so will,shall heal me, which no one else neither god nor man can do.'
4.  But Minerva resolved to help Ulysses, so she bound the ways of allthe winds except one, and made them lie quite still; but she rouseda good stiff breeze from the North that should lay the waters tillUlysses reached the land of the Phaeacians where he would be safe.
5.  And the ghost of Amphimedon answered, "Agamemnon, son of Atreus,king of men, I remember everything that you have said, and will tellyou fully and accurately about the way in which our end was broughtabout. Ulysses had been long gone, and we were courting his wife,who did not say point blank that she would not marry, nor yet bringmatters to an end, for she meant to compass our destruction: this,then, was the trick she played us. She set up a great tambour frame inher room and began to work on an enormous piece of fine needlework.'Sweethearts,' said she, 'Ulysses is indeed dead, still, do notpress me to marry again immediately; wait- for I would not have myskill in needlework perish unrecorded- till I have completed a pallfor the hero Laertes, against the time when death shall take him. Heis very rich, and the women of the place will talk if he is laid outwithout a pall.' This is what she said, and we assented; whereuponwe could see her working upon her great web all day long, but at nightshe would unpick the stitches again by torchlight. She fooled us inthis way for three years without our finding it out, but as timewore on and she was now in her fourth year, in the waning of moons andmany days had been accomplished, one of her maids who knew what shewas doing told us, and we caught her in the act of undoing her work,so she had to finish it whether she would or no; and when she showedus the robe she had made, after she had had it washed, its splendourwas as that of the sun or moon.
6.  And Penelope said, "If the gods are going to vouchsafe you a happiertime in your old age, you may hope then to have some respite frommisfortune."

计划指导

1.  "Telemachus, you should not remain so far away from home any longer,nor leave your property with such dangerous people in your house; theywill eat up everything you have among them, and you will have beenon a fool's errand. Ask Menelaus to send you home at once if youwish to find your excellent mother still there when you get back.Her father and brothers are already urging her to marry Eurymachus,who has given her more than any of the others, and has been greatlyincreasing his wedding presents. I hope nothing valuable may have beentaken from the house in spite of you, but you know what women are-they always want to do the best they can for the man who marries them,and never give another thought to the children of their first husband,nor to their father either when he is dead and done with. Go home,therefore, and put everything in charge of the most respectablewoman servant that you have, until it shall please heaven to sendyou a wife of your own. Let me tell you also of another matter whichyou had better attend to. The chief men among the suitors are lying inwait for you in the Strait between Ithaca and Samos, and they meanto kill you before you can reach home. I do not much think they willsucceed; it is more likely that some of those who are now eating upyour property will find a grave themselves. Sail night and day, andkeep your ship well away from the islands; the god who watches overyou and protects you will send you a fair wind. As soon as you getto Ithaca send your ship and men on to the town, but yourself gostraight to the swineherd who has charge your pigs; he is welldisposed towards you, stay with him, therefore, for the night, andthen send him to Penelope to tell her that you have got back safe fromPylos."
2.  But Minerva resolved to help Ulysses, so she bound the ways of allthe winds except one, and made them lie quite still; but she rouseda good stiff breeze from the North that should lay the waters tillUlysses reached the land of the Phaeacians where he would be safe.
3.  "Madam, wife of Ulysses, Telemachus does not understand thesethings; listen therefore to me, for I can divine them surely, and willhide nothing from you. May Jove the king of heaven be my witness,and the rites of hospitality, with that hearth of Ulysses to which Inow come, that Ulysses himself is even now in Ithaca, and, eithergoing about the country or staying in one place, is enquiring into allthese evil deeds and preparing a day of reckoning for the suitors. Isaw an omen when I was on the ship which meant this, and I toldTelemachus about it."
4.  "Stockman, and you swineherd, I have something in my mind which I amin doubt whether to say or no; but I think I will say it. Whatmanner of men would you be to stand by Ulysses, if some god shouldbring him back here all of a sudden? Say which you are disposed to do-to side with the suitors, or with Ulysses?"
5.  They gathered round the ghost of the son of Peleus, and the ghost ofAgamemnon joined them, sorrowing bitterly. Round him were gatheredalso the ghosts of those who had perished with him in the house ofAeisthus; and the ghost of Achilles spoke first.
6.  Pontonous mixed the wine and handed it to every one in turn; theothers each from his own seat made a drink-offering to the blessedgods that live in heaven, but Ulysses rose and placed the double cupin the hands of queen Arete.

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1.  Laertes answered, "Would, by Father Jove, Minerva, and Apollo,that I were the man I was when I ruled among the Cephallenians, andtook Nericum, that strong fortress on the foreland. If I were stillwhat I then was and had been in our house yesterday with my armour on,I should have been able to stand by you and help you against thesuitors. I should have killed a great many of them, and you would haverejoiced to see it."
2.  THEN Mercury of Cyllene summoned the ghosts of the suitors, and inhis hand he held the fair golden wand with which he seals men's eyesin sleep or wakes them just as he pleases; with this he roused theghosts and led them, while they followed whining and gibberingbehind him. As bats fly squealing in the hollow of some great cave,when one of them has fallen out of the cluster in which they hang,even so did the ghosts whine and squeal as Mercury the healer ofsorrow led them down into the dark abode of death. When they hadpassed the waters of Oceanus and the rock Leucas, they came to thegates of the sun and the land of dreams, whereon they reached themeadow of asphodel where dwell the souls and shadows of them thatcan labour no more.
3.  "I had hardly finished telling everything to the men before wereached the island of the two Sirens, for the wind had been veryfavourable. Then all of a sudden it fell dead calm; there was not abreath of wind nor a ripple upon the water, so the men furled thesails and stowed them; then taking to their oars they whitened thewater with the foam they raised in rowing. Meanwhile I look a largewheel of wax and cut it up small with my sword. Then I kneaded the waxin my strong hands till it became soft, which it soon did betweenthe kneading and the rays of the sun-god son of Hyperion. Then Istopped the ears of all my men, and they bound me hands and feet tothe mast as I stood upright on the crosspiece; but they went on rowingthemselves. When we had got within earshot of the land, and the shipwas going at a good rate, the Sirens saw that we were getting in shoreand began with their singing.
4.  And Penelope said, "If the gods are going to vouchsafe you a happiertime in your old age, you may hope then to have some respite frommisfortune."
5.   Then Theoclymenus said, 'And what, my dear young friend, is tobecome of me? To whose house, among all your chief men, am I torepair? or shall I go straight to your own house and to your mother?"
6.  "Goddess," answered Ulysses, "all that you have said is true, butI am in some doubt as to how I shall be able to kill these wickedsuitors single handed, seeing what a number of them there alwaysare. And there is this further difficulty, which is still moreconsiderable. Supposing that with Jove's and your assistance I succeedin killing them, I must ask you to consider where I am to escape tofrom their avengers when it is all over."

应用

1.  "'Stranger,' said she, 'I will make it all quite clear to you. Aboutthe time when the sun shall have reached mid heaven, the old man ofthe sea comes up from under the waves, heralded by the West windthat furs the water over his head. As soon as he has come up he liesdown, and goes to sleep in a great sea cave, where the seals-Halosydne's chickens as they call them- come up also from the greysea, and go to sleep in shoals all round him; and a very strong andfish-like smell do they bring with them. Early to-morrow morning Iwill take you to this place and will lay you in ambush. Pick out,therefore, the three best men you have in your fleet, and I willtell you all the tricks that the old man will play you.
2.  They all held their peace except King Alcinous, who began, "Sir,we have had much pleasure in hearing all that you have told us, fromwhich I understand that you are willing to show your prowess, ashaving been displeased with some insolent remarks that have beenmade to you by one of our athletes, and which could never have beenuttered by any one who knows how to talk with propriety. I hope youwill apprehend my meaning, and will explain to any be one of yourchief men who may be dining with yourself and your family when you gethome, that we have an hereditary aptitude for accomplishments of allkinds. We are not particularly remarkable for our boxing, nor yet aswrestlers, but we are singularly fleet of foot and are excellentsailors. We are extremely fond of good dinners, music, and dancing; wealso like frequent changes of linen, warm baths, and good beds, sonow, please, some of you who are the best dancers set about dancing,that our guest on his return home may be able to tell his friendshow much we surpass all other nations as sailors, runners, dancers,minstrels. Demodocus has left his lyre at my house, so run some one orother of you and fetch it for him."
3.  Telemachus was the first to speak. "So you have got back,Eumaeus," said he. "What is the news of the town? Have the suitorsreturned, or are they still waiting over yonder, to take me on myway home?"
4、  And Ulysses said, "I am no god, why should you take me for one? I amyour father, on whose account you grieve and suffer so much at thehands of lawless men."
5、  "And I saw Leda the wife of Tyndarus, who bore him two famoussons, Castor breaker of horses, and Pollux the mighty boxer. Boththese heroes are lying under the earth, though they are still alive,for by a special dispensation of Jove, they die and come to lifeagain, each one of them every other day throughout all time, andthey have the rank of gods.

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  • 刘博 08-06

      BOOK XXIV.

  • 罗伯特·布鲁克斯 08-06

      As he spoke Jove sent two eagles from the top of the mountain, andthey flew on and on with the wind, sailing side by side in their ownlordly flight. When they were right over the middle of the assemblythey wheeled and circled about, beating the air with their wings andglaring death into the eyes of them that were below; then, fightingfiercely and tearing at one another, they flew off towards the rightover the town. The people wondered as they saw them, and asked eachother what an this might be; whereon Halitherses, who was the bestprophet and reader of omens among them, spoke to them plainly and inall honesty, saying:

  • 杜世忠 08-06

       On this he took his leave, and Calypso went out to look for Ulysses,for she had heard Jove's message. She found him sitting upon the beachwith his eyes ever filled with tears, and dying of sheerhome-sickness; for he had got tired of Calypso, and though he wasforced to sleep with her in the cave by night, it was she, not he,that would have it so. As for the day time, he spent it on the rocksand on the sea-shore, weeping, crying aloud for his despair, andalways looking out upon the sea. Calypso then went close up to himsaid:

  • 哈坎·萨缪尔森 08-06

      "See now, how men lay blame upon us gods for what is after allnothing but their own folly. Look at Aegisthus; he must needs makelove to Agamemnon's wife unrighteously and then kill Agamemnon, thoughhe knew it would be the death of him; for I sent Mercury to warn himnot to do either of these things, inasmuch as Orestes would be sure totake his revenge when he grew up and wanted to return home. Mercurytold him this in all good will but he would not listen, and now he haspaid for everything in full."

  • 蒿雀 08-05

    {  "Then,' he said, 'if you would finish your voyage and get homequickly, you must offer sacrifices to Jove and to the rest of the godsbefore embarking; for it is decreed that you shall not get back toyour friends, and to your own house, till you have returned to theheaven fed stream of Egypt, and offered holy hecatombs to the immortalgods that reign in heaven. When you have done this they will let youfinish your voyage.'

  • 乔昌坤 08-04

      "Be off, old man," he cried, "from the doorway, or you shall bedragged out neck and heels. Do you not see that they are all giving methe wink, and wanting me to turn you out by force, only I do notlike to do so? Get up then, and go of yourself, or we shall come toblows."}

  • 张新 08-04

      "Thus spoke Proteus, and I was broken hearted as I heard him. Isat down upon the sands and wept; I felt as though I could no longerbear to live nor look upon the light of the sun. Presently, when I hadhad my fill of weeping and writhing upon the ground, the old man ofthe sea said, 'Son of Atreus, do not waste any more time in cryingso bitterly; it can do no manner of good; find your way home as fastas ever you can, for Aegisthus be still alive, and even though Oresteshas beforehand with you in kilting him, you may yet come in for hisfuneral.'

  • 张延平 08-04

      But Minerva would not let the suitors for one moment cease theirinsolence, for she wanted Ulysses to become even more bitter againstthem; she therefore set Eurymachus son of Polybus on to gibe at him,which made the others laugh. "Listen to me," said he, "you suitorsof Queen Penelope, that I may speak even as I am minded. It is not fornothing that this man has come to the house of Ulysses; I believethe light has not been coming from the torches, but from his own head-for his hair is all gone, every bit of it."

  • 许颂诗 08-03

       "I am not surprised, my dear mother, at your displeasure," repliedTelemachus, "I understand all about it and know when things are not asthey should be, which I could not do when I was younger; I cannot,however, behave with perfect propriety at all times. First one andthen another of these wicked people here keeps driving me out of mymind, and I have no one to stand by me. After all, however, this fightbetween Irus and the stranger did not turn out as the suitors meant itto do, for the stranger got the best of it. I wish Father Jove,Minerva, and Apollo would break the neck of every one of thesewooers of yours, some inside the house and some out; and I wish theymight all be as limp as Irus is over yonder in the gate of the outercourt. See how he nods his head like a drunken man; he has had sucha thrashing that he cannot stand on his feet nor get back to his home,wherever that may be, for has no strength left in him."

  • 约翰·伊斯科特 08-01

    {  "May it be even so," answered Penelope; "if your words come true,you shall have such gifts and such good will from me that all whosee you shall congratulate you."

  • 比斯利 08-01

      To this Nausicaa answered, "Stranger, you appear to be a sensible,well-disposed person. There is no accounting for luck; Jove givesprosperity to rich and poor just as he chooses, so you must takewhat he has seen fit to send you, and make the best of it. Now,however, that you have come to this our country, you shall not wantfor clothes nor for anything else that a foreigner in distress mayreasonably look for. I will show you the way to the town, and willtell you the name of our people; we are called Phaeacians, and I amdaughter to Alcinous, in whom the whole power of the state is vested."

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