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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:欧爱民 大小:g08eF5jS71342KB 下载:bT5lOCzX73906次
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日期:2020-08-10 21:35:12
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刘湖边

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  And let none pitty her distresse,
2.  Every Vice (choice Ladies) as very well you know, redoundeth tothe great disgrace and prejudice of him, or her, by whom it ispractised, and oftentimes to others. Now, among those commonhurtfull enemies, the sinne or vice which most carrieth us with fullcarrere, and draweth us into unadvoydable dangers (in mine opinion)seemeth to be that of choller or anger, which is a sodain andinconsiderate moving, provoked by some received injury, which havingexcluded all respect of reason, and dimnd (with darke vapors) thebright discerning sight of the understanding, enflameth the minde withmost violent fury. And albeit this inconvenience hapneth most tomen, and more to some few then others, yet notwithstanding, it hathbene noted, that women have felt the selfesame infirmity, and inmore extreme manner, because it much sooner is kindled in them, andburneth with the brighter flame, in regard they have the lesserconsideration, and therefore not to be wondred at. For if we wiladvisedly observe, we shall plainely perceive, that fire even of hisowne nature) taketh hold on such things as are light and tender,much sooner then it can on hard and weighty substances; and some of uswomen (let men take no offence at my words) are farre more soft anddelicate then they be, and therefore more fraile. In which regard,seeing wee are naturally enclined hereto, and considering also, howmuch our affability and gentlenesse do shew themselves pleasing andfull of content to those men with whom we are to live; and likewise,how anger and fury are compacted of extraordinary perils: I purpose(because we may be the more valiant in our courage, to outstand thefierce assaults of wrath and rage) to shew you by mine ensuing Novell,how the loves of three yong Gentlemen, and of as many Gentlewomen,came to fatall and fortunat successe by the tempestuous anger of oneamong them, as I have formerly related unto you.
3.  Ah Master Doctor, the love I be to your capricious and rarelycircumcised experience, and likewise the confidence I repose in yourscrutinous taciturnitie, are both of such mighty and prevailingpower as I cannot conceale any thing from you, which you covet toknow. And therefore, if you wil sweare unto me by the crosse ofMonteson, that never (as you have already faithfully promised) youwill disclose a secret so admirable; I will relate it unto you, andnot otherwise. The Doctor sware, and sware againe, and then Bruno thusbegan.
4.  Thorello (whom the Soldane called by no other name, then theChristian, neyther of them knowing the other) sadly now remembredhis departure from Pavia, devising and practising many times, how hemight escape thence, but could not compasse it by any possible meanes.Wherefore, certaine Ambassadours beeing sent by the Genewayes, toredeeme divers Cittizens of theirs, there detained as prisoners, andbeing ready to returne home againe: he purposed to write to hisWife, that he was living, and wold repaire to her so soone as hecould, desiring the still continued rememberance of her limitedtime. By close and cunning meanes hee wrote the Letter, earnestlyintreating one of the Ambassadors (who knew him perfectly, but made nooutward apparance thereof) to deale in such sort for him, that theLetter might be delivered to the handes of the Abbot Di San Pietroin Ciel d'Oro, who was (indeede) his Unckle.
5.  After that Philomena had finished her Tale, she sate still; andDioneus (with faire and pleasing Language) commended theGentlewomans quaint cunning, but smiling at the Confessors witlessesimplicity. Then the Queene, turning with chearefull looks towardPamphilus, commaunded him to continue on their delight; who gladlyyeelded, and thus began. Madame, many men there are, who while theystrive to climbe from a good estate, to a seeming better; doe becomein much worse condition then they were before. As happened to aneighbour of ours, and no long time since, as the accident will betteracquaint you withall.
6.  Spinelloccio being departed from Zeppa (who followed faire andsoftly after him)

计划指导

1.  Being each of them endued with gentle spirits, and having beguntheir studies together: they arose (by degrees) to the glorious heightof Philosophy, to their much admired fame and commendation. In thismanner they lived, to the no meane comfort of Chremes, hardlydistinguishing the one from the other for his Son, and thus theSchollers continued the space of three yeares. At the ending wherof(as it hapneth in al things else) Chremes died, whereat both the youngGentlemen conceived such hearty griefe, as if he had bin theircommon father; nor could the kinred of Chremes discerne, which ofthe two had most need of comfort, the losse touched them so equally.
2.  Madam Aemilia no sooner concluded her Novell, but Madam Neiphila (bythe Kings command) began to speake in this manner. It seemeth to me(Gracious Ladies) that there are some such people to be found, whoimagine themselves to know more, then all other else in the worldbeside, and yet indeede do know nothing at all: presuming (thoroughthis arrogant opinion of theirs) to imploy and oppose their senselesseunderstanding, against infallible grounded reason, yea, and to attemptcourses, not only contrary to the counsell and judgement of men, butalso to crosse the nature of divine ordination. Out of which saucy andambitious presumption, many mighty harmes have already hadbeginning, and more are like to ensue uppon such boldnesse, because itis the ground of all evils.
3.  When night was come, the Provoste also came according toappointment, even when two brethren were in their lodging, they easilyheard his entrance, as Piccarda (being present with them) had informedthem. In went the Provoste without any candle, or making the leastnoise to be heard, and being in Piccardaes Chamber, went to bed:Ciutazza tarrying not long from him, but (as her Mistresse hadinstructed her) she went to bed likewise, not speaking any word atall, and the Provoste, imagining to have her there, whom he sohighly affected, fell to imbracing and kissing Ciutazza, who was asforward in the same manner to him, and there for a while I intend toleave them.
4.  Aniolliero chancing to awake, arose and made him ready, withoutany servant to helpe him; then calling for Fortarigo, and nothearing any tydings of him: he began immediately to imagine, that hewas become drunke, and so had falne asleepe in one place or other,as very often he was wont to doe. Wherefore, determining so to leavehim, he caused the male and Saddle to be set on his horse, and so tofurnish himselfe with a more honest servant at Corsignano.
5.  It it a great while since, when among those that were LordMarquesses of Saluzzo, the very greatest and worthiest man of them al,was a young Noble Lord, named Gualtiero, who having neyther wife norchilde, spent his time in nothing else but hawking and hunting: norhad he any minde of marriage, or to enjoy the benefit of children,wherein many did repute him the wiser. But this being distastfull tohis subjects, they very often earnestly solicited him, to matchhimselfe with a wife, to the end, that hee might not decease withoutan heire, nor they be left destitute of a succeeding Lord; offeringthemselves to provide him of such a one, so well descended by Fatherand Mother, as not only should confirm their hope, but also yeeldhim high contentment; whereto the Lord Marquess thus answered.
6.  Sing wee together, but in no sad mood,

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1.  IS, THE OCCASION OF MANY GREAT AND WORTHY COURTESIES
2.  THE SIXT DAY, THE EIGHTH NOVELL
3.  Know then (most gracious assembly) that it is not many yeeres since,when there lived in Salerne, a very famous Physitian, named SignieurMazzeo della Montagna, who being already well entred into yeeres,would (neverthelesse) marrie with a beautifull young Mayden of theCity, bestowing rich garments, gaudie attyres, Ringes, and Jewelles onher, such as few Women else could any way equall, because hee lovedher most deerely. Yet being an aged man, and never remembring, howvaine and idle a thing it is, for age to make such an unfittingElection, injurious to both; and therefore endangering that domestickeagreement, which ought to be the sole and maine comfort of Marriage:it maketh me therefore to misdoubt, that as in our former Tale ofSigniour Ricciardo de Cinzica, some dayes of the Calender did hereseeme as distastefull, as those that occasioned the other Womansdiscontentment. In such unequall choyses, Parents commonly are moreblamewoorthy, then any imputation, to bee layde on the young Women,who gladdely would enjoy such as in heart they have elected: butthat their Parents, looking through the glasse of greedie lucre, doeoverthrow both their owne hopes, and the faire fortunes of theirchildren together.
4.  At one time among the rest, it chanced that he brought a Damosellthither named Nicholetta, who was maintained by a wily companion,called Magione, in a dwelling which hee had at Camaldoli, and (indeed)no honester then she should be. She was a very beautifull young woman,wearing garments of great value, and (according to her quality) wellspoken, and of commendable carriage. Comming forth of her Chamberone day, covered with a White veyle, because her haire hung looseabout her, which shee went to wash at a Well in the middle Court,bathing there also her face and hands: Calandrino going (by chance) tothe same Well for water, gave her a secret salutation. She kindlyreturning the like courtesie to him, began to observe him advisedly:more, because he looked like a man newly come thither, then anyhandsomnesse she perceyved in him.
5.   Are John and I: Go from our dore,
6.  The Ladies being thus at their owne disposing, some of them baredtheir legges and feete, to wash them in the coole current. Others, notso minded, walked on the greene grasse, and under the goodly spread:trees. Dioneus and Madame Fiammetta, they sate singing together, thelove-warre between Arcit and Palemon. And thus with diversity ofdisports, in choice delight and much contentment, all were imployed,till Supper drew neere. When the houre re come, and the Tables coveredby the Ponds side: we need not question their dyet and dainties,infinite Birds sweetly singing about them, as no musicke in theworld could be more pleasing; beside calme windes, fanning their facesfrom the neighbouring hilles (free from flyes, or the least annoyance)made a delicate addition to their pleasure.

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1.  Which being done, he commanded that Thorello (who wasindifferently recovered) should be attyred in one of his ownesumptuous Saracine Roabes, the very fairest and richest that everwas seene, and on his head a Majesticall Turbant, after the mannerof his owne wearing, and the houre appearing to be somewhat late, hewith many of his best Baschaes, went to the Chamber where Thorellowas, and sitting downe a while by him, in teares thus he spake.Signior Thorello, the houre for sundering you and me, is now veryneere, and because I cannot beare you company, in regard of thebusinesse you goe about, and which by no meanes will admit it: I am totake my leave of you in this Chamber, and therefore am purposelycome to doe it. But before I bid you farewell, let me entreat you,by the love and friendship confirmed betweene us, to be mindfull ofme, and to take such order (your affaires being fully finished inLombardie) that I may once more enjoy the sight of you here, for amutuall solace and satisfaction of our mindes, which are now dividedby this urgent hast. Till which may be granted, let me want novisitation of your kind letters, commanding thereby of me,whatsoever here can possibly be done for you: assuring your selfe,no man living can command me as you doe.
2.  Are in my power,
3.  Tancrede, Prince of Salerne, caused the amorous friend of hisdaughter to bee slaine, and sent her his heart in a cup of Gold: whichafterwards she steeped in an impoysoned water, and then drinking it,so dyed.
4、  And, because day-light should not discover her on the Tarrasse,she went to make her descent downe againe: but finding the Ladder tobe taken away, and thinking how her publike shame was nowinevitable, her heart dismayed, and shee fell downe in a swoune on theTarras: yet recovering her senses afterward, her greefe and sorrow ex.ceeded all capacity of utterance. For, now she became fully perswaded,that this proceeded from the Schollers malice, repenting for herunkinde usage towards him, but much more condemning her selfe, forreposing any trust in him, who stood bound (by good reason) to beher enemy.
5、  Among many other evill conditions, very frequent and familiar in herhusband Tofano; he tooke a great delight in drinking, which not onlyhe held to be a commendable quality, but was alwaies so oftensolicited thereto: that Cheta her selfe began to like and allow itin him, feeding his humor so effectually, with quaffing and carowsing,that (at any time when she listed) she could make him bowsie beyondeall measure: and leaving him sleeping in this drunkennesse, wouldalwayes get her selfe to bed. By helpe heereof, she compassed thefirst familiarity with her friend, yea, divers times after, asoccasion served: and so confidently did she builde on her husbandsdrunkennesse, that not onely shee adventured to bring her friendhome into her owne house; but also would as often go to his, which wassome-what neere at hand, and abide with him there, the most part ofthe night season.While Cheta thus continued on these amorous courses, it fortuned,that her slye suspitious husband, beganne to perceive, that thoughshee drunke very much with him, yea, untill he was quite spent andgone: yet she remained fresh and sober still, and therby imaginedstrange matters, that he being fast asleepe, his wife then tookeadvantage of his drowsinesse, and mightand so forth. Beeing desirousto make experience of this his distrust, hee returned home at night(not having drunke any thing all the whole day) dissembling both byhis words and behaviour, as if he were notoriously drunke indeede.Which his Wife constantly beleeving, saide to her selfe: That heehad now more neede of sleepe, then drinke; getting him immediatelyinto his warme bed; and then going downe the staires againe, softlywent out of doores unto her Friends house, as formerly she had used todo, and there shee remained untill midnight.

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  • 钟松 08-09

      The good old Lady imagined, that this was a matter somewhatdifficult, and might lay a blamefull imputation on her daughter.Neverthelesse, considering, what an honest office it was in her, tobee the meanes, whereby so worthy a Countesse should recover anunkinde husband, led altogether by lust, and not a jot of cordialllove; she knew the intent to be honest, the Countesse vertuous, andher promise religious, and therefore undertooke to effect it. Withinfew dayes after, verie ingeniously, and according to the instructedorder, the Ring was obtayned, albeit much against the Counts will; andthe Countesse, in sted of the Ladies vertuous daughter, was embracedby him in bed: the houre proving so auspicious, and juno being Lady ofthe ascendent, conjoyned with the witty Mercury, shee conceived of twogoodly Sonnes, and her deliverance agreed correspondently with thejust time.Thus the old Lady, not at this time onely, but at many other meetingsbesides; gave the Countesse free possession of her husbands pleasures,yet alwayes in such darke and concealed secrecie, as it was neversuspected, nor knowne by any but themselves, the Count lying withhis owne wife, and disappointed of her whom he more deerely loved.Alwayes at his uprising in the mornings (which usually was beforethe break of day, for preventing the least scruple of suspicion)many familiar conferences passed betweene them, with the gifts ofdivers faire: and costly jewels; all which the Countesse carefullykept, and perceiving assuredly, that shee was conceived with childe,shee would no longer bee troublesome to the good old Lady; but callingher aside, spake thus to her. Madame, I must needes give thankes toheaven and you, because my desires are amply accomplished, and bothtime and your deserts doe justly challenge, that I shouldaccordingly quite you before my departure. It remaineth now in yourowne power, to make what demand you please of me, which yet I will notgive you by way of reward, because that would seeme to bee base andmercenary: but onely whatsoever you shall receive of me, is inhonourable recompence of faire and vertuous deservings, such as anyhonest and well-minded Lady in the like distresse, may with goodcredit allow, and yet no prejudice to her reputation.

  • 安仔 08-09

      Say to my Soveraigne Lord, that I must die

  • 赵昕东 08-09

       Now, it is not to be denyed, that whosoever hath need of helpe,and is to bee governed: meerely reason commandeth, that they shouldbee subject and obedient to their governour. Who then should we havefor our helps and governours, if not men? Wherfore, we should beintirely subject to them, in giving them due honour and reverence, andsuch a one as shall depart from this rule: she (in mine opinion) isnot onely worthy of grievous reprehension, but also severechastisement beside. And to this exact consideration (over and abovedivers other important reasons) I am the rather induced, by theNovel which Madame Pampinea so lately reported, concerning the frowardand wilfull wife of Talano, who had a heavier punishment inflictedon her, then her Husband could devise to doe. And therefore it is myperemptory sentence, that all such women as will not be gracious,benigne and pleasing: doe justly deserve (as I have already said)rude, rough and harsh handling, as both nature, custome and lawes havecommanded.

  • 冯志广 08-09

      You need make no doubt, but the poore maide wept exceedingly, as shehad good occasion to doe: and albeit many times she desired mercy, andthat hee would not bee so cruell to her: yet notwithstanding, hervoyce was so broken with crying, and his impacience so extreame,that rage hindered all power of distinguishing, or knowing his wivestongue from a strangers. Having thus madly beaten her, and cut thelockes off from her head, thus he spake to her. Wicked woman, and nowife of mine, be sure I have not done with thee yet; for, although Imeane not now to beate thee any longer: I will goe to thy brethren,and they shall understand thy dishonest behaviour. Then will I bringthem home with me, and they perceiving how much thou hast abusedboth their honour and thine owne; let them deale with thee as theyfinde occasion, for thou art no more a companion for me. No sooner hadhe uttered these angry words, but hee went forth of the Chamber,bolting it fast on the outward side, as meaning to keepe her safelyinclosed, and out of the house he went alone by himselfe.

  • 阿维·阿拉德 08-08

    {  In the morning, he sent to the Bridegroom, and advertised him,that he (with a stranger newly arrived) intended to dine with him,which the Gentleman accepted in thankefull manner. And when dinnertime came, Thorello in his strange disguise went with the Abbot to theBridegroomes house, where he was lookt on with admiration of all theguests, but not knowne or suspected by any one; because the Abbotreported him to be a Sarracine, and sent by the Soldane (in Ambassage)to the King of France. Thorello was seated at a by-table, but directlyopposite to the new Bride, whom hee much delighted to looke on, andeasily collected by her sad countenance, that shee was scarcely wellpleased with this new nuptialls. She likewise beheld him very often,not in regard of any knowlege she took of him: for the bushiness ofhis beard, strangeness of habit, (but most of all) firm beleefe of hisdeath, was the maine prevention.

  • 袁野 08-07

      I am sure Salabetto, you are angry with mee, because I restorednot your Florines at my promised day. Salabetto smiling, presentlyanswered. Beleeve me Lady (quoth he) it did a little distast me,even as I could have bin offended with him, that should plucke outmy heart to bestow it on you, if it would yeelde you anycontentment. But to let you know unfainedly, how much I am incensedwith anger against you: such and so great is the affection I beareyou, that I have solde the better part of my whole estate,converting the same into Wealthy Merchandises, which I have alreadiebrought hither with mee, and valewing above two thousand Florines, allwhich are stored up in my Magazine. There must they remaine, tillanother Ship come forth of the Westerne parts, wherein I have a muchgreater adventure, amounting unto more then three thousand Florines.And my purpose is, to make my aboade heere in this City, which hathwon the sole possession of my heart, onely in regard of myBiancafiore, to whom I am so intirely devoted, as both my selfe, andwhatsoever else is mine (now or hereafter) is dedicated onely to herservice; whereto thus she replyed.}

  • 董建岳 08-07

      The ground-plot descending from those hils or mountaines, grew lesseand lesse by variable degrees, as wee observe at entering into ourTheaters, from the highest part to the lowest, succinctly to narrowthe circle by order. Now, concerning these ground-plottes or littleMeadowes, those which the Sun Southward looked on, were full of Vines,Olive-trees, Almond-trees, Cherry-trees, and Figge-trees, withdivers other Trees beside, so plentifully bearing fruites, as youcould not discerne a hands bredth of losse. The other Mountaines,whereon the Northerne windes blow, were curiously covered with smallThickets or Woods of Oakes, Ashes, and other Trees so greene andstraite, as it was impossible to behold fairer. The goodly plaine itselfe, not having any other entrance, but where the Ladies came in,was planted with Trees of Firre, Cipresse, Laurell, and Pines; sosingularly growing in formall order, as if some artificiall or cunninghand had planted them, the Sun hardly piercing through their branches,from the top to the bottome, even at his highest, or any part of hiscourse.

  • 摩西·马龙 08-07

      Heereupon the Duke of Athens, beeing young, goodly, and valiant ofperson as also a neere Kinsman to the Prince, had a desire to see her;and under colour of visiting his noble Kinsman, (as oftentimesbefore he had done) attended with an honourable traine, to Smirna hecame, being there most royally welcommed, and bounteously feasted.Within some few dayes of his there being, conference passed betweenethem, concerning the rare beauty of the Ladie; the Duke questioningthe Prince, whether shee was of such wonder, as fame had acquaintedthe World withall? Whereto the Prince replyed; Much more (Noblekinsman) then can bee spoken of, as your owne eyes shall witnesse,without crediting any words of mine. The Duke soliciting the Princethereto very earnestly, they both went together to see her; and shehaving before heard of their comming, adorned her selfe the moreMajestically, entertaining them with ceremonious demeanor (after herCountries custome) which gave most gracious and unspeakable acception.

  • 苏眉 08-06

       THE SEVENTH DAY, THE FIFT NOVELL

  • 李牧 08-04

    {  Hereupon, he brought him into the hall where his furniture was, asalso all his people, and commanding a window to be opned, wherat hemight behold his horses, he said. My Lord, let me plainely give you tounderstand, that neither cowardise, or basenesse of minde, inducedGhinotto di Tacco (which is my selfe) to become a lurking robber onthe high-wayes, an enemy to the Pope, and so (consequently) to theRomane Court: but onely to save his owne life and honour knowinghimselfe to be a Gentleman cast out of his owne house, and having(beside) infinite enemies. But because you seeme to be a worthyLord, I will not (although I have cured your stomacks disease) dealewith you as I doe to others, whose goods (when they fall into mypower) I take such part of as I please: but rather am wellcontented, that my necessities being considered by your selfe, youspare me out a proportion of the things you have heere, answerableto your owne liking. For all are present here before you, both in thisHall, and in the Court beneath, free from any spoyle, or the leastimpairing. Wherefore, give a part, or take all, if you please, andthen depart hence when you will, or abide heere still, for now you areat your owne free liberty.

  • 黎苗 08-04

      When the Mother had heard these words, and confidently beleevedher Daughter: she began to torment her selfe with anger, saying. Bythe faith of my body Daughter, this unkindnesse is not [to] beendured, but rather let the dogge be hanged, that his qualities may beknowne, he being utterly unworthy, to have so good a woman to hiswife, as thou art. What could he have done if he had taken thee in theopen more, and in company of some wanton Gallants? In an unfortunatehoure wast thou married to him, base jealous Coxecombe as he is, andit is quite against sense, or reason, that thou shouldest be subjectto his fooleries. What was hee, but a Merchant of Eale-skinnes orOrenges, bred in some paltry countrey village; taken fromHogge-rubbing; clothed in Sheepes-Sattin, with Clownish Startops,Leather stockings, and Caddies garters: His whole habite not worththree shillings: And yet he must have a faire Gentlewoman to his Wife,of honest fame, riches and reputation; when, comparing his pedegreewith hers, hee is farre unfit to wipe her shooes.

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