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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:黄宏 大小:L9QekpR960280KB 下载:0RAH85ep24368次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:hUPjGZGT45390条
日期:2020-08-05 11:05:05
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曹世婵

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Telemachus answered, "Antinous, do not chide with me, but, godwilling, I will be chief too if I can. Is this the worst fate youcan think of for me? It is no bad thing to be a chief, for it bringsboth riches and honour. Still, now that Ulysses is dead there are manygreat men in Ithaca both old and young, and some other may take thelead among them; nevertheless I will be chief in my own house, andwill rule those whom Ulysses has won for me."
2.  "I went on board, bidding my men to do so also and loose thehawsers; so they took their places and smote the grey sea with theiroars. When we got to the land, which was not far, there, on the faceof a cliff near the sea, we saw a great cave overhung with laurels. Itwas a station for a great many sheep and goats, and outside therewas a large yard, with a high wall round it made of stones builtinto the ground and of trees both pine and oak. This was the abodeof a huge monster who was then away from home shepherding hisflocks. He would have nothing to do with other people, but led thelife of an outlaw. He was a horrid creature, not like a human being atall, but resembling rather some crag that stands out boldly againstthe sky on the top of a high mountain.
3.  "Thus she both was, and still is, respected beyond measure by herchildren, by Alcinous himself, and by the whole people, who lookupon her as a goddess, and greet her whenever she goes about the city,for she is a thoroughly good woman both in head and heart, and whenany women are friends of hers, she will help their husbands also tosettle their disputes. If you can gain her good will, you may haveevery hope of seeing your friends again, and getting safely back toyour home and country."
4.  Then Melanthius the goatherd answered, "You ill-conditioned cur,what are you talking about? Some day or other I will put you onboard ship and take you to a foreign country, where I can sell you andpocket the money you will fetch. I wish I were as sure that Apollowould strike Telemachus dead this very day, or that the suitorswould kill him, as I am that Ulysses will never come home again."
5.  Then Penelope sprang up from her couch, threw her arms roundEuryclea, and wept for joy. "But my dear nurse," said she, "explainthis to me; if he has really come home as you say, how did he manageto overcome the wicked suitors single handed, seeing what a numberof them there always were?"
6.  As he spoke he girded on his armour. Then he roused Telemachus,Philoetius, and Eumaeus, and told them all to put on their armouralso. This they did, and armed themselves. When they had done so, theyopened the gates and sallied forth, Ulysses leading the way. It wasnow daylight, but Minerva nevertheless concealed them in darknessand led them quickly out of the town.

计划指导

1.  "My good friend," answered Jove, "I should recommend you at the verymoment when the people from the city are watching the ship on her way,to turn it into a rock near the land and looking like a ship. Thiswill astonish everybody, and you can then bury their city under themountain."
2.  The rest agreed, and Leiodes son of OEnops was the first to rise. Hewas sacrificial priest to the suitors, and sat in the corner nearthe mixing-bowl. He was the only man who hated their evil deeds andwas indignant with the others. He was now the first to take the bowand arrow, so he went on to the pavement to make his trial, but hecould not string the bow, for his hands were weak and unused to hardwork, they therefore soon grew tired, and he said to the suitors,"My friends, I cannot string it; let another have it; this bow shalltake the life and soul out of many a chief among us, for it isbetter to die than to live after having missed the prize that wehave so long striven for, and which has brought us so long together.Some one of us is even now hoping and praying that he may marryPenelope, but when he has seen this bow and tried it, let him wooand make bridal offerings to some other woman, and let Penelopemarry whoever makes her the best offer and whose lot it is to winher."
3.  He then took off his armour and gave it to Eumaeus and Philoetius,who went straight on to the house, while he turned off into thevineyard to make trial of his father. As he went down into the greatorchard, he did not see Dolius, nor any of his sons nor of the otherbondsmen, for they were all gathering thorns to make a fence for thevineyard, at the place where the old man had told them; he thereforefound his father alone, hoeing a vine. He had on a dirty old shirt,patched and very shabby; his legs were bound round with thongs ofoxhide to save him from the brambles, and he also wore sleeves ofleather; he had a goat skin cap on his head, and was looking verywoe-begone. When Ulysses saw him so worn, so old and full of sorrow,he stood still under a tall pear tree and began to weep. He doubtedwhether to embrace him, kiss him, and tell him all about his havingcome home, or whether he should first question him and see what hewould say. In the end he deemed it best to be crafty with him, so inthis mind he went up to his father, who was bending down and diggingabout a plant.
4.  "My poor good man," said she, "why is Neptune so furiously angrywith you? He is giving you a great deal of trouble, but for all hisbluster he will not kill you. You seem to be a sensible person, dothen as I bid you; strip, leave your raft to drive before the wind,and swim to the Phaecian coast where better luck awaits you. And here,take my veil and put it round your chest; it is enchanted, and you cancome to no harm so long as you wear it. As soon as you touch land takeit off, throw it back as far as you can into the sea, and then go awayagain." With these words she took off her veil and gave it him. Thenshe dived down again like a sea-gull and vanished beneath the darkblue waters.
5.  "Cease your weeping, lest some one should come outside and see us,and tell those who a are within. When you go in, do so separately, notboth together; I will go first, and do you follow afterwards; Let thismoreover be the token between us; the suitors will all of them tryto prevent me from getting hold of the bow and quiver; do you,therefore, Eumaeus, place it in my hands when you are carrying itabout, and tell the women to close the doors of their apartment. Ifthey hear any groaning or uproar as of men fighting about the house,they must not come out; they must keep quiet, and stay where theyare at their work. And I charge you, Philoetius, to make fast thedoors of the outer court, and to bind them securely at once."
6.  "I was told all this by Calypso, who said she had heard it fromthe mouth of Mercury.

推荐功能

1.  Then Minerva bethought her of another matter. She took his shape,and went round the town to each one of the crew, telling them tomeet at the ship by sundown. She went also to Noemon son ofPhronius, and asked him to let her have a ship- which he was veryready to do. When the sun had set and darkness was over all theland, she got the ship into the water, put all the tackle on board herthat ships generally carry, and stationed her at the end of theharbour. Presently the crew came up, and the goddess spokeencouragingly to each of them.
2.  On this he began chopping firewood, while the others brought in afine fat five year old boar pig, and set it at the altar. Eumaeusdid not forget the gods, for he was a man of good principles, so thefirst thing he did was to cut bristles from the pig's face and throwthem into the fire, praying to all the gods as he did so thatUlysses might return home again. Then he clubbed the pig with a billetof oak which he had kept back when he was chopping the firewood, andstunned it, while the others slaughtered and singed it. Then theycut it up, and Eumaeus began by putting raw pieces from each jointon to some of the fat; these he sprinkled with barley meal, and laidupon the embers; they cut the rest of the meat up small, put thepieces upon the spits and roasted them till they were done; whenthey had taken them off the spits they threw them on to the dresser ina heap. The swineherd, who was a most equitable man, then stood upto give every one his share. He made seven portions; one of these heset apart for Mercury the son of Maia and the nymphs, praying tothem as he did so; the others he dealt out to the men man by man. Hegave Ulysses some slices cut lengthways down the loin as a mark ofespecial honour, and Ulysses was much pleased. "I hope, Eumaeus," saidhe, "that Jove will be as well disposed towards you as I am, for therespect you are showing to an outcast like myself."
3.  Now when the sun had set and darkness was over the land.
4.  "With this I left the ship and went up inland. When I got throughthe charmed grove, and was near the great house of the enchantressCirce, I met Mercury with his golden wand, disguised as a young man inthe hey-day of his youth and beauty with the down just coming upon hisface. He came up to me and took my hand within his own, saying, 'Mypoor unhappy man, whither are you going over this mountain top,alone and without knowing the way? Your men are shut up in Circe'spigsties, like so many wild boars in their lairs. You surely do notfancy that you can set them free? I can tell you that you will neverget back and will have to stay there with the rest of them. Butnever mind, I will protect you and get you out of your difficulty.Take this herb, which is one of great virtue, and keep it about youwhen you go to Circe's house, it will be a talisman to you againstevery kind of mischief.
5.   "Hear me," he cried, "you god who visited me yesterday, and bademe sail the seas in search of my father who has so long beenmissing. I would obey you, but the Achaeans, and more particularly thewicked suitors, are hindering me that I cannot do so."
6.  "I then gave him some more; three times did I fill the bowl for him,and three times did he drain it without thought or heed; then, whenI saw that the wine had got into his head, I said to him asplausibly as I could: 'Cyclops, you ask my name and I will tell ityou; give me, therefore, the present you promised me; my name isNoman; this is what my father and mother and my friends have alwayscalled me.'

应用

1.  "After him I saw huge Orion in a meadow full of asphodel driving theghosts of the wild beasts that he had killed upon the mountains, andhe had a great bronze club in his hand, unbreakable for ever and ever.
2.  "King Alcinous, you said your people were the nimblest dancers inthe world, and indeed they have proved themselves to be so. I wasastonished as I saw them."
3.  On this he received Theoclymenus' spear and laid it down on the deckof the ship. He went on board and sat in the stern, biddingTheoclymenus sit beside him; then the men let go the hawsers.Telemachus told them to catch hold of the ropes, and they made allhaste to do so. They set the mast in its socket in the cross plank,raised it and made it fast with the forestays, and they hoistedtheir white sails with sheets of twisted ox hide. Minerva sent thema fair wind that blew fresh and strong to take the ship on hercourse as fast as possible. Thus then they passed by Crouni andChalcis.
4、  He led the way as he spoke, and Minerva followed him. When they werewithin he took her spear and set it in the spear- stand against astrong bearing-post along with the many other spears of his unhappyfather, and he conducted her to a richly decorated seat under which hethrew a cloth of damask. There was a footstool also for her feet,and he set another seat near her for himself, away from the suitors,that she might not be annoyed while eating by their noise andinsolence, and that he might ask her more freely about his father.
5、  "This hound," answered Eumaeus, "belonged to him who has died in afar country. If he were what he was when Ulysses left for Troy, hewould soon show you what he could do. There was not a wild beast inthe forest that could get away from him when he was once on itstracks. But now he has fallen on evil times, for his master is deadand gone, and the women take no care of him. Servants never do theirwork when their master's hand is no longer over them, for Jove takeshalf the goodness out of a man when he makes a slave of him."

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  • 毛宇住 08-04

      "I also saw Maera and Clymene and hateful Eriphyle, who sold her ownhusband for gold. But it would take me all night if I were to nameevery single one of the wives and daughters of heroes whom I saw,and it is time for me to go to bed, either on board ship with my crew,or here. As for my escort, heaven and yourselves will see to it."

  • 布罗斯 08-04

      "Goddess," replied Ulysses, "do not be angry with me about this. Iam quite aware that my wife Penelope is nothing like so tall or sobeautiful as yourself. She is only a woman, whereas you are animmortal. Nevertheless, I want to get home, and can think of nothingelse. If some god wrecks me when I am on the sea, I will bear it andmake the best of it. I have had infinite trouble both by land andsea already, so let this go with the rest."

  • 李晓霞 08-04

       On this they hurried off on their several errands. The heifer wasbrought in from the plain, and Telemachus's crew came from the ship;the goldsmith brought the anvil, hammer, and tongs, with which heworked his gold, and Minerva herself came to the sacrifice. Nestorgave out the gold, and the smith gilded the horns of the heifer thatthe goddess might have pleasure in their beauty. Then Stratius andEchephron brought her in by the horns; Aretus fetched water from thehouse in a ewer that had a flower pattern on it, and in his other handhe held a basket of barley meal; sturdy Thrasymedes stood by with asharp axe, ready to strike the heifer, while Perseus held a bucket.Then Nestor began with washing his hands and sprinkling the barleymeal, and he offered many a prayer to Minerva as he threw a lockfrom the heifer's head upon the fire.

  • 梁小虹 08-04

      With these words he picked up the sword that Agelaus had droppedwhen he was being killed, and which was lying upon the ground. Then hestruck Leiodes on the back of his neck, so that his head fellrolling in the dust while he was yet speaking.

  • 陈佐洱 08-03

    {  Then Eumaeus said, "You have perceived aright, as indeed yougenerally do; but let us think what will be our best course. Willyou go inside first and join the suitors, leaving me here behindyou, or will you wait here and let me go in first? But do not waitlong, or some one may you loitering about outside, and throw somethingat you. Consider this matter I pray you."

  • 徐益众 08-02

      On this, as he passed, he gave Ulysses a kick on the hip out of purewantonness, but Ulysses stood firm, and did not budge from the path.For a moment he doubted whether or no to fly at Melanthius and killhim with his staff, or fling him to the ground and beat his brainsout; he resolved, however, to endure it and keep himself in check, butthe swineherd looked straight at Melanthius and rebuked him, liftingup his hands and praying to heaven as he did so.}

  • 托马斯·杰弗逊 08-02

      Immediately afterwards Ulysses came inside, looking like a poormiserable old beggar, leaning on his staff and with his clothes all inrags. He sat down upon the threshold of ash-wood just inside the doorsleading from the outer to the inner court, and against abearing-post of cypress-wood which the carpenter had skillfullyplaned, and had made to join truly with rule and line. Telemachus tooka whole loaf from the bread-basket, with as much meat as he could holdin his two hands, and said to Eumaeus, "Take this to the stranger, andtell him to go the round of the suitors, and beg from them; a beggarmust not be shamefaced."

  • 图利 08-02

      To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "Poor unhappy stranger, Ihave found the story of your misfortunes extremely interesting, butthat part about Ulysses is not right; and you will never get me tobelieve it. Why should a man like you go about telling lies in thisway? I know all about the return of my master. The gods one and all ofthem detest him, or they would have taken him before Troy, or lethim die with friends around him when the days of his fighting weredone; for then the Achaeans would have built a mound over his ashesand his son would have been heir to his renown, but now the stormwinds have spirited him away we know not whither.

  • 任学光 08-01

       "[The gale from the West had now spent its force, and the wind gotinto the South again, which frightened me lest I should be takenback to the terrible whirlpool of Charybdis. This indeed was whatactually happened, for I was borne along by the waves all night, andby sunrise had reacfied the rock of Scylla, and the whirlpool. She wasthen sucking down the salt sea water, but I was carried aloft towardthe fig tree, which I caught hold of and clung on to like a bat. Icould not plant my feet anywhere so as to stand securely, for theroots were a long way off and the boughs that overshadowed the wholepool were too high, too vast, and too far apart for me to reachthem; so I hung patiently on, waiting till the pool should dischargemy mast and raft again- and a very long while it seemed. A jurymanis not more glad to get home to supper, after having been longdetained in court by troublesome cases, than I was to see my raftbeginning to work its way out of the whirlpool again. At last I let gowith my hands and feet, and fell heavily into the sea, bard by my rafton to which I then got, and began to row with my hands. As for Scylla,the father of gods and men would not let her get further sight ofme- otherwise I should have certainly been lost.]

  • 徐金梧 07-30

    {  So Eteoneus bustled back and bade other servants come with him. Theytook their sweating hands from under the yoke, made them fast to themangers, and gave them a feed of oats and barley mixed. Then theyleaned the chariot against the end wall of the courtyard, and ledthe way into the house. Telemachus and Pisistratus were astonishedwhen they saw it, for its splendour was as that of the sun and moon;then, when they had admired everything to their heart's content,they went into the bath room and washed themselves.

  • 赵昭炘 07-30

      "As he spoke he dived under the waves, whereon I turned back tothe ships with my companions, and my heart was clouded with care asI went along. When we reached the ships we got supper ready, for nightwas falling, and camped down upon the beach. When the child ofmorning, rosy-fingered Dawn appeared, we drew our ships into thewater, and put our masts and sails within them; then we went onboard ourselves, took our seats on the benches, and smote the grey seawith our oars. I again stationed my ships in the heaven-fed streamof Egypt, and offered hecatombs that were full and sufficient. WhenI had thus appeased heaven's anger, I raised a barrow to the memory ofAgamemnon that his name might live for ever, after which I had a quickpassage home, for the gods sent me a fair wind.

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