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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:贾福 大小:MI9w9Wcz18869KB 下载:SrhsaiX278900次
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日期:2020-08-09 15:05:38
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张炳良

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  When Ferandoes senses were recovered againe, and he found himselfeto be in such a darkesome place; not knowing where he was, hebeganne to crie and make a noyse. When presently the Monke ofBologna (according as the Abbot had tutored him) stept into thedungeon, carrying a little waxe candle in the one hand, and a smartingwhip in the other, going to Ferando, he stript off his cloathes, andbegan to lash him very soundly. Ferando roaring and crying, couldsay nothing else, but where am I? The Monke (with a dreadfull voyce)replyed: Thou art in Purgatory. How? saide Ferando; what? Am I dead?Thou art dead (quoth the Monke) and began to lash him lustilyagaine. Poore Ferando, crying out for his Wife and little Sonne,demanded a number of idle questions, whereto the Monke still fittedhim with as fantasticke answers. Within a while after, he set bothfoode and wine before him, which when Ferando saw, he saide; How isthis? Doe dead men eate and drinke? Yes, replyed the Monke, and thisfoode which here thou seest, thy Wife brought hither to the Churchthis morning, to have Masses devoutly sung for thy soule, and as toother, so must it be set before thee, for such is the command of thePatrone of this place.
2.  In the end of all when I was come home into mine owne house, thisdivellish and accursed woman, being aloft uppon my stayres head, bymuch misfortune chanced to see me; in regard (as it is not unknowne toyou) that women cause all things to lose their vertue. In whichrespect, I that could have stild my selfe the onely happy man inFlorence, am now made most miserable. And therefore did I justly beateher, so long as she was able to stand against mee, and I know noreason to the contrary, why I should not yet teare her in a thousandpeeces: for I may well curse the day of our mariage, to hinder andbereave me of such an invisible blessednesse.
3.  The Mistresse understanding now apparantly, the full effect of thewhole businesse, and in what manner it had bene carried, revealed tothe Maide her husbands speeches, concerning the glasse of sleepieWater, which was the onely engine of all this trouble, clearlyacquitting Ruggiero of the robbery, howsoever (in desparate fury,and to make an end of a life so contemptible) he had wrongfullyaccused himselfe. And notwithstanding this his hard fortune, whichhath made him much more infamous then before, in all the dissolutebehaviour of his life: yet it could not quaile her affection towardshim; but being loath he should dye for some other mans offence, andhoping his future reformation; she fell on her knees before herMistresse, and (drowned in her teares) most earnestly entreated her,to advise her with some such happy course, as might be the safety ofpoore Ruggieroes life. Mistresse Doctor, affecting her Maidedearely, and plainely perceiving, that no disastrous fortunewhatsoever, could alter her love to condemned Ruggiero; hoping thebest hereafter, as the Maide her selfe did, and willing to save liferather then suffer it to be lost without just cause, she directedher in such discreet manner, as you will better conceive by thesuccesse.
4.  I found my selfe the further plunged in.
5.  It chanced on a day, that Alessandro rode somewhat neere to theAbbot, who stedfastly beholding him, perceived that he was a verycomely young man, so affable, lovely, and gracious, that even inthis first encounter, he had never seene any man before that betterpleased him. Calling him a little closer, he began to conferrefamiliarly with him, demanding what he was, whence he came, andwhether he travelled. Alessandro imparted freely to him all hisaffaires, in every thing satisfying his demands, and offering(although his power was small) to doe him all the service he could.
6.  In the mean while, by Lesca she sent the sound tooth to Pyrrhus, who(wondering not a little at her so many strange attempts, which heeurged so much the rather, as thinking their performance impossible,and in meere loyall duty to his Lord) seeing them all three to benotably effected; he made no further doubt of her intire love towardeshim, but sent her assurance likewise, of his readinesse andserviceable diligence, whensoever she would command him.

计划指导

1.  Not utterable. I curst the day and houre
2.  I am not able to expresse their counterchanges of courtesie,Saladine commanding him to be cloathed in Royall garments, andbrought into the presence of his very greatest Lords, where havingspoken liberally in his due commendation, he commanded them tohonour him as himselfe, if they expected any grace or favour from him,which every one did immediatly, but (above all the rest) those twoBaschaes, which accompanied Saladine at his house. The greatnesse ofthis pompe and glory, so suddenly throwne on Signior Thorello, madehim halfe forget all matters of Lomberdie; and so much the rather,because he had no doubt at all, but that his letters, were safely cometo the hands of his Uncle.
3.  Menghino stayed with his troope, in a neere neighbouring house tothe Mayden, attending when the signall would be given: but Giovanniand his consorts, were ambushed somewhat further off from the house,and both saw when Jacomino went foorth to supper. Now Grinello and theChambermaide began to vary, which should send the other out of theway, till they had effected their severall invention; wheruponGrinello said to her. What maketh thee to walke thus about thehouse, and why doest thou not get thee to bed? And thou (quoth theMaide) why doest thou not goe to attend on our Master, and tarry forhis returning home? I am sure thou hast supt long agoe, and I knowno businesse here in the house for thee to doe. Thus (by no meanes)the one could send away the other, but either remained as the othershinderance.
4.  Nor am I so ignorant, but publike knowledge of such an error in mee,would be reputed a shrewd taxation of honesty: whereas (on the otherside) secret carriage, and heedfull managing such amorous affaires,may passe for currant without any reproach. And let me tel you,noble Count, that I repute love highly favourable to mee, by guidingmy judgement with such moderation, to make election of a wise, worthy,and honorable friend, fit to enjoy the grace of a farre greater Ladythen I am, and the first letter of his name, is the Count D'Angiers.For if error have not misled mine eye, as in love no Lady can beeasily deceived: for person, perfections, and all parts most to beecommended in a man, the whole Realme of France containeth not yourequall. Observe beside, how forward Fortune sheweth her selfe to usboth in this case; you to bee destitute of a wife, as I am of anhusband; for I account him as dead to me, when he denies me the dutiesbelonging to a wife. Wherefore, in regard of the unfained affectionI beare you, and compassion which you ought to have of a RoyallPrincesse, even almost sicke to death for your sake, I earnestlyentreat you, not to deny mee your loving society, but pittying myyouth and fiery affections (never to be quenched but by yourkindnesse) I may enjoy my hearts desire.
5.  When the Novel of Philostratus was concluded, which made some of theLadies blush, and the rest to smile: it pleased the Queene, that MadamPampinea should follow next, to second the other gone before; whenshe, smiling on the whole assembly, began thus. There are some menso shallow of capacity, that they will (neverthelesse) make shew ofknowing and understanding such things, as neither they are able todoe, nor appertaine to them: whereby they will sometimes reprehendother new errours, and such faults as they have unwillingly committed,thinking thereby to hide their owne shame, when they make it much moreapparant and manifest. For proofe whereof, faire company, in acontrary kinde I will shew you the subtill cunning of one, who(perhaps) may bee reputed of lesse reckning then Massetto; and yethe went beyond a King, that thought himselfe to be a much wiser man.
6.  Upon these clamours and complaints, the Potestates Lieutenant (beinga man of rude quality) tooke him sodainly aside, and examined him ofthe crimes wherewith he was charged. But Martellino, as making noaccount of these accusations, laughed, and returned scoffing answeres.Whereat the Judge, waxing much displeased, delivered him over to theStrappado, and stood by himselfe, to have him confesse the crimesimposed on him, and then to hang him afterward. Being let downe to theground, the Judge still demaunded of him, whether the accusationsagainst him were true, or no? Affirming, that it nothing avayled himto deny it: whereupon hee thus spake to the Judge. My Lord, I am heereready before you, to confesse the truth; but I pray you, demaund ofall them that accuse me, when and where I did cut their purses, andthen I wil tell you that, which (as yet) I have not done, otherwiseI purpose to make you no more answers.Well (quoth the Judge) thou requirest but reason; and callingdivers of the accusers, one of them saide, that he lost his purseeight dayes before; another saide six, another foure, and some saidethe very same day. Which Martellino hearing, replyed. My Lord, theyall lie in their throats, as I will plainly prove before you. Iwould to God I had never set foot within this City, as it is notmany houres since my first entrance, and presently after minearrivall, I went (in evill houre I may say for me) to see the Saintsbody, where I was thus beaten as you may beholde. That all this istrue which I say unto you, the Seigneurie Officer that keeps yourBooke of presentations, will testifie for me, as also the Host where Iam lodged. Wherefore good my Lord, if you finde all no otherwise, thenas I have said, I humbly entreate you, that upon these bad mensreportes and false informations, I may not be thus tormented, andput in perill of my life.

推荐功能

1.  When Blondello was thus parted from him, Guiotto folowed not farreoff behind him, to behold the issue of this angry businesse; andSignior Phillippo, because he could not catch the Porter, continuedmuch distempred, fretting and fuming, in regard he could notcomprehend the meaning of the Porters message: but onely surmized,that Blondello (by the procurement of some body else) had done this inscorne of him.
2.  The young Maiden, who was still dismayed by her owne Dreame,became much more afflicted in her minde, when shee had heard thisother reported by Gabriello: but yet to give him no occasion ofdistast, she bare it out in the best manner she could devise to doe.And albeit they spent the time in much pleasing discourse,maintained with infinite sweete kisses on either side: yet was shestill suspitious, but knew not whereof; fixing her eyes oftentimesupon his face, and throwing strange lookes to all parts of the Garden,to catch hold on any such blacke ugly sight, whereof he had formerlymade description to her. As thus she continued in these afflictingfeares, it fortuned, that Gabriello sodainly breathing forth a veryvehement sighe, and throwing his armes fast about her, said: O helpeme dear Love, or else I dye; and, in speaking the words, fell downeupon the ground. Which the yong Damosel perceiving, and drawing himinto her lappe, weeping saide: Alas sweete Friend, What paine doestthou feele?
3.  The King in royall magnificence, replied sodainly, that he washighly pleased with these good tydings; and having sent honorablyfor hir from Baffa, with great pompe she was conducted to Famagosta,and there most graciously welcommed both by the King and Queene,with solemne triumphes, bankets, and revelling, performed in mostMajesticke manner. Being questioned by the King and Queene, concerningso large a time of strange misfortunes: according as Antigonus hadformerly enstructed her, so did she shape the forme of her answers,and satisfied (with honor) all their demands. So, within few daiesafter, upon her earnest and instant request, with an honourable traineof Lords and Ladies, shee was sent thence, and conducted all the wayby Antigonus, untill she came unto the Soldans Court.
4.  By this time, the kindred and friends to the dead man (uppon noiseof his death bruited abroad) were likewise come to the Pallace, yea,most of the men and women dwelling in the Cittie, the bodie ofGabriello being laide in the midst of the Court, upon the whiteDamaske shrowd given by Andreana, with infinite Roses and othersweet Flowers lying theron: and such was the peoples love to him, thatnever was any mans death, more to be bemoaned and lamented. Beingdelivered out of the Court, it was carried to buriall, not like aBurgesse or ordinary Citizen, but with such pompe as beseemed a LordBaron, and on the shoulders of very noble Gentlemen, with greathonor and reverence.
5.   Thou has bene kinde:
6.  When notice heereof was given to the Potestate, he arose; and sheebeing brought foorth into the Hall before him, he questioned with her,how and by what meanes this accident happened. Beside, he sent fordivers Physitians, to be informed by them, whether the Gentlemanwere poysoned, or otherwise murthered? All of them affirmed thecontrarie, avouching rather, that some Impostumation had engenderedneere his heart, which sodainly breaking, occasioned his as sodainedeath. The Potestate hearing this, and perceiving that Andreana waslittle or nothing at all faulty in the matter, her beauty and goodcarriage, kindled a vitlanous and lustful desire in him towards her,provoking him to the immodest motion, that upon granting hisrequest, he would release her. But when he saw, that all hisperswasions were to no purpose, hee sought to compasse his will byviolence; which like a vertuous and valiant Virago, shee worthilywithstood, defending her honour Nobly, and reprooving him with manyinjurious speeches, such as a lustfull Letcher Justlie deserved.

应用

1.  Titus tooke home with him his friend Gisippus, and after he hadsharpely reproved him for his distrust, and cold credence of hisfriendship: he brought him to Sophronia, who welcomed him as lovingly,as if he had bin her naturall borne brother, bemoaning his hard anddisastrous fortune, and taking especiall care, to convert all passeddistresses, into as happy and comfortable a change, fitting him withgarments and attendants, beseeming his degree both in Nobility andvertue. Titus, out of his honourable bounty, imparted halfe hislands and rich possessions to him, and afterward gave him in marriage,his owne Sister, a most beautifull Lady, named Fulvia, saying to himbeside. My deare friend Gisippus, it remaineth now in thine owneelection, whether thou wilt live here still with me, or returnebacke to Athens, with all the wealth which I have bestowed on thee.But Gisippus, being one way constrayned, by the sentence of banishmentfrom his native City, and then againe, in regard of the constant love,which he bare to so true and thankefull friend as Titus was: concludedto live there as a loyall Roman, where he with his Fulvia, and Tituswith his faire Sophronia, lived long after together in one and thesame house, augmenting daily (if possible it might be) their amitybeyond all other equalizing.
2.  Often she would come to Rustico and say: "Father, I came hither toserve God, not to stand idle. Let us go put the Devil in Hell." Andonce, when it had been done, she asked: "Rustico, why does he wantto get out of Hell? If only he would stay there as willingly as Helltakes him in and holds him, he would never want to come out at all."By thus constantly egging him on and exhorting him to God's servicethe girl so preyed upon Rustico that he shivered with cold whenanother man would have sweated. He had perforce to tell her that itwas not just to punish the Devil by putting him in Hell save when hehad lifted his head in pride; and that by God's mercy they had sochastened him that he only implored Heaven to be left in peace. Thusfor a time he silenced her.
3.  Where have you bin Sir? quoth she. Are you becom a night-walkerafter other Women? And could no worse garments serve your turne, butyour Doctors gown of Scarlet? Am I to suffer this behaviour? Or am notI sufficient to content you, but you must be longing after change? Iwould thou hadst bin stifled in that foule filth, where thy foulerlife did justly cast thee. Behold goodly Master Doctor of theLeystall, who being maried to an honest woman must yet go abroad inthe night time, insatiatly lusting after whores and harlots. Withthese and the like intemperate speeches, she ceased not to afflict andtorment him, till the night was almost spent, and the Doctor broughtinto a sweeter savour.
4、  Beside, many Italians returning home, and carrying this report forcredible; some were so audaciously presumptuous, as they avouched upontheir oathes, that not onely they saw him dead, but were present athis buriall likewise. Which rumour comming to the eare of his Wife,and likewise to his kinred and hers: procured a great and grievousmourning among them, and all that happened to heare thereof.
5、  So sweet and pleasing seemed the Song to the King (who tooke nosmall delight, both to heare and behold the Damosels) even as if allthe Hirarchies of Angels were descended from the Heavens to singbefore him. No sooner was the Song ended, but (humbly on theirknees) they craved favour of the King for their departing. Now,although their departure was greatly grieving to him, yet (inoutward appearance) he seemed willing to grant it.

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网友评论(SmuG7vWS12036))

  • 杨晨超 08-08

      Say shee the word, in full felicity

  • 阿尔特塔 08-08

      But when I listened Loves alluring,

  • 贾府 08-08

       And if not I, etc.

  • 孙正平 08-08

      You are then to understand (Gracious Auditors) that in Lombardiethere was a goodly Monastery, very famous for Holinesse andReligion, where, among other sanctified Sisters, there was a yongGentlewoman, endued with very singular beautie, being namedIsabella, who on a day, when a Kinsman of hers came to see her atthe grate, became enamored of a young Gentleman, being then in hiscompany.

  • 李清香 08-07

    {  The Maids counsell past under the seale of allowance, only herMistris thought it not convenient, that (having affected hirn sodeerely) she should mangle his body with any wounds; but rather to letit be gathered by more likely-hood, that villaines had strangledhim, and then conveyed his body into the Chest. Away she sends theMaide, to see whether the Chest stood there still, or no; as indeedeit did, and unlockt, whereof they were not a little joyfull. By thehelpe of her Mistresse, the Maide tooke Ruggiero upon her shoulders,and bringing him to the doore, with dilligent respect that no onecould discover them; in the Chest they laide him, and so there lefthim, closing downe the lidde according as they found it.

  • 张朝华 08-06

      Wit, carriage, purest eloquence,}

  • 周子宁 08-06

      Having thus consulted with her selfe, many desperate motionsentred her minde, to throw her selfe headlong from off the Tarras;till better thoughts wone possession of her soule. And the Sunne beingrisen, shee went to every corner of the Tarras, to espye any Ladcome abroad with his beasts, by whom she might send for herwaitingwoman. About this instant, the Scholler who lay sleeping (allthis while) under a bush, suddenly awaking; saw her looke over thewall, and she likewise espyed him; whereupon hee said unto her. Goodmorrow Madame Helena, What? are the Ladies come yet or no? Helenabearing his scorning question, and grieving that hee should sodelude her: in teares and lamentations, she intreated him to comeneere the Tower, because she desired to speake with him. Whichcourtesie he did not deny her, and she lying groveling upon herbrest on the Tarras, to hide her body that no part thereof might beseene, but her head; weeping, she spake thus to him.

  • 郭碧銮 08-06

      Having related his manifold mischances, his Hoste friendly advisedhim with speede to get him out of Naples. As instantly he did,returning home to Perouse, having adventured his five hundredCrownes on a Ring, wherewith hee purposed to have bought Horses,according to the intent of his journey thither.

  • 张漪 08-05

       Alathiella mistrusting no such trechery intended against her, andliking the Wines pleasing taste extraordinarily, dranke more thenstoode with her precedent modest resolution, and forgetting all herpassed adversities, became very frolicke and merry: so that seeingsome women dance after the manner observed there in Majorica, she alsofell to dauncing according to the Alexandrian custome. Which whenBajazeth beheld, he imagined the victory to be more then halfewonne, and his hearts desire verie neere the obtaining: plying herstill with wine upon wine, and continuing this revelling the most partof the night.

  • 郑旭东 08-03

    {  Now, notwithstanding the actions of Calandrino have beeneindifferently canvazed among us; yet, remembring what Philostratus notlong since saide, That they intended to nothing more then matter ofmirth: I presume the boldlier, to report another Novell of him, besidethem already past. And, were I willing to conceale the truth, andcloath it in more circumstantiall maner: I could make use ofcontrary names, and paint it in a poeticall fiction, perhaps moreprobable, though not so pleasing. But because wandring from thetruth of things, doth much diminish (in relatic the delight of thehearers: I will build boldly on my fore-alledged reason, and tel youtruly how it hapned.

  • 西伯 08-03

      Being come home in safety to Ravello, he fell on his knees, andthanked God for all his mercies towards him. Then opening the sacke,and viewing the jewels at more leysure then formerly he had done, hefound them to be of so great estimation, that selling them but atordinary and reasonable rates, he was three times richer, then whenhee departed first from his house. And having vented them all, he senta great summe of money to the good woman at Corfu, that had rescuedhim out of the Sea, and saved his life in a danger so dreadfull. Thelike he did to Tranium, to the Merchants that had newly cloathedhim; living richly upon the remainder, and never adventuring more tothe Sea, but ended his dayes in wealth and honour.

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