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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:王士雄 大小:mMMlzo1438875KB 下载:FWpNJ8TF99737次
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日期:2020-08-08 09:31:09
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Then Minerva bethought her of another matter. When she deemed thatUlysses had had both of his wife and of repose, she badegold-enthroned Dawn rise out of Oceanus that she might shed light uponmankind. On this, Ulysses rose from his comfortable bed and said toPenelope, "Wife, we have both of us had our full share of troubles,you, here, in lamenting my absence, and I in being prevented fromgetting home though I was longing all the time to do so. Now, however,that we have at last come together, take care of the property thatis in the house. As for the sheep and goats which the wicked suitorshave eaten, I will take many myself by force from other people, andwill compel the Achaeans to make good the rest till they shall havefilled all my yards. I am now going to the wooded lands out in thecountry to see my father who has so long been grieved on my account,and to yourself I will give these instructions, though you have littleneed of them. At sunrise it will at once get abroad that I have beenkilling the suitors; go upstairs, therefore, and stay there withyour women. See nobody and ask no questions."
2.  "Hence I was carried along for nine days till on the tenth night thegods stranded me on the Ogygian island, where dwells the great andpowerful goddess Calypso. She took me in and was kind to me, but Ineed say no more about this, for I told you and your noble wife allabout it yesterday, and I hate saying the same thing over and overagain."
3.  "Then I saw Chloris, whom Neleus married for her beauty, havinggiven priceless presents for her. She was youngest daughter to Amphionson of Iasus and king of Minyan Orchomenus, and was Queen in Pylos.She bore Nestor, Chromius, and Periclymenus, and she also bore thatmarvellously lovely woman Pero, who was wooed by all the countryround; but Neleus would only give her to him who should raid thecattle of Iphicles from the grazing grounds of Phylace, and this was ahard task. The only man who would undertake to raid them was a certainexcellent seer, but the will of heaven was against him, for therangers of the cattle caught him and put him in prison; neverthelesswhen a full year had passed and the same season came round again,Iphicles set him at liberty, after he had expounded all the oracles ofheaven. Thus, then, was the will of Jove accomplished.
4.  When he had said this, he seated himself beside Alcinous. Supper wasthen served, and the wine was mixed for drinking. A servant led in thefavourite bard Demodocus, and set him in the midst of the company,near one of the bearing-posts supporting the cloister, that he mightlean against it. Then Ulysses cut off a piece of roast pork withplenty of fat (for there was abundance left on the joint) and saidto a servant, "Take this piece of pork over to Demodocus and tellhim to eat it; for all the pain his lays may cause me I will salutehim none the less; bards are honoured and respected throughout theworld, for the muse teaches them their songs and loves them."
5.  The king was delighted at this, and exclaimed to the Phaecians"Aldermen and town councillors, our guest seems to be a person ofsingular judgement; let us give him such proof of our hospitality ashe may reasonably expect. There are twelve chief men among you, andcounting myself there are thirteen; contribute, each of you, a cleancloak, a shirt, and a talent of fine gold; let us give him all this ina lump down at once, so that when he gets his supper he may do so witha light heart. As for Euryalus he will have to make a formal apologyand a present too, for he has been rude."
6.  "But I rushed at her with my sword drawn as though I would kill her,whereon she fell with a loud scream, clasped my knees, and spokepiteously, saying, 'Who and whence are you? from what place and peoplehave you come? How can it be that my drugs have no power to charm you?Never yet was any man able to stand so much as a taste of the herb Igave you; you must be spell-proof; surely you can be none other thanthe bold hero Ulysses, who Mercury always said would come here someday with his ship while on his way home form Troy; so be it then;sheathe your sword and let us go to bed, that we may make friendsand learn to trust each other.'

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1.  Then she called her maids and said, "Stay where you are, yougirls. Can you not see a man without running away from him? Do youtake him for a robber or a murderer? Neither he nor any one else cancome here to do us Phaeacians any harm, for we are dear to the gods,and live apart on a land's end that juts into the sounding sea, andhave nothing to do with any other people. This is only some poor manwho has lost his way, and we must be kind to him, for strangers andforeigners in distress are under Jove's protection, and will take whatthey can get and be thankful; so, girls, give the poor fellowsomething to eat and drink, and wash him in the stream at some placethat is sheltered from the wind."
2.  "Hear me, men of Ithaca, and I speak more particularly to thesuitors, for I see mischief brewing for them. Ulysses is not goingto be away much longer; indeed he is close at hand to deal out deathand destruction, not on them alone, but on many another of us who livein Ithaca. Let us then be wise in time, and put a stop to thiswickedness before he comes. Let the suitors do so of their own accord;it will be better for them, for I am not prophesying without dueknowledge; everything has happened to Ulysses as I foretold when theArgives set out for Troy, and he with them. I said that after goingthrough much hardship and losing all his men he should come home againin the twentieth year and that no one would know him; and now all thisis coming true."
3.  "'Cyclops,' said I, 'you should have taken better measure of yourman before eating up his comrades in your cave. You wretch, eat upyour visitors in your own house? You might have known that your sinwould find you out, and now Jove and the other gods have punishedyou.'
4.  "And a pretty figure I should cut then," replied Eumaeus, both nowand hereafter, if I were to kill you after receiving you into my hutand showing you hospitality. I should have to say my prayers in goodearnest if I did; but it is just supper time and I hope my men willcome in directly, that we may cook something savoury for supper."
5.  "Offer a prayer, sir," said he, "to King Neptune, for it is hisfeast that you are joining; when you have duly prayed and made yourdrink-offering, pass the cup to your friend that he may do so also.I doubt not that he too lifts his hands in prayer, for man cannot livewithout God in the world. Still he is younger than you are, and ismuch of an age with myself, so I he handed I will give you theprecedence."
6.  "When I had told him this, the ghost of Achilles strode off across ameadow full of asphodel, exulting over what I had said concerningthe prowess of his son.

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1.  Then Jove's daughter Helen bethought her of another matter. Shedrugged the wine with an herb that banishes all care, sorrow, andill humour. Whoever drinks wine thus drugged cannot shed a single tearall the rest of the day, not even though his father and mother both ofthem drop down dead, or he sees a brother or a son hewn in piecesbefore his very eyes. This drug, of such sovereign power and virtue,had been given to Helen by Polydamna wife of Thon, a woman of Egypt,where there grow all sorts of herbs, some good to put into themixing-bowl and others poisonous. Moreover, every one in the wholecountry is a skilled physician, for they are of the race of Paeeon.When Helen had put this drug in the bowl, and had told the servants toserve the wine round, she said:
2.  "He would not answer, but turned away to Erebus and to the otherghosts; nevertheless, I should have made him talk to me in spite ofhis being so angry, or I should have gone talking to him, only thatthere were still others among the dead whom I desired to see.
3.  NOW when the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared,Alcinous and Ulysses both rose, and Alcinous led the way to thePhaecian place of assembly, which was near the ships. When they gotthere they sat down side by side on a seat of polished stone, whileMinerva took the form of one of Alcinous' servants, and went round thetown in order to help Ulysses to get home. She went up to thecitizens, man by man, and said, "Aldermen and town councillors ofthe Phaeacians, come to the assembly all of you and listen to thestranger who has just come off a long voyage to the house of KingAlcinous; he looks like an immortal god."
4.  "I know, and understand you," replied Ulysses; "you need say nomore. Let us be going, but if you have a stick ready cut, let mehave it to walk with, for you say the road is a very rough one."
5.   On this Ulysses began to move off, and said, "Your looks, my finesir, are better than your breeding; if you were in your own houseyou would not spare a poor man so much as a pinch of salt, forthough you are in another man's, and surrounded with abundance, youcannot find it in you to give him even a piece of bread."
6.  Now Neptune had gone off to the Ethiopians, who are at the world'send, and lie in two halves, the one looking West and the other East.He had gone there to accept a hecatomb of sheep and oxen, and wasenjoying himself at his festival; but the other gods met in thehouse of Olympian Jove, and the sire of gods and men spoke first. Atthat moment he was thinking of Aegisthus, who had been killed byAgamemnon's son Orestes; so he said to the other gods:

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1.  Ulysses shuddered as he heard her. "Now goddess," he answered,"there is something behind all this; you cannot be really meaning tohelp me home when you bid me do such a dreadful thing as put to sea ona raft. Not even a well-found ship with a fair wind could venture onsuch a distant voyage: nothing that you can say or do shall mage me goon board a raft unless you first solemnly swear that you mean me nomischief."
2.  Calypso trembled with rage when she heard this, "You gods," sheexclaimed, to be ashamed of yourselves. You are always jealous andhate seeing a goddess take a fancy to a mortal man, and live withhim in open matrimony. So when rosy-fingered Dawn made love toOrion, you precious gods were all of you furious till Diana went andkilled him in Ortygia. So again when Ceres fell in love with Iasion,and yielded to him in a thrice ploughed fallow field, Jove came tohear of it before so long and killed Iasion with his thunder-bolts.And now you are angry with me too because I have a man here. I foundthe poor creature sitting all alone astride of a keel, for Jove hadstruck his ship with lightning and sunk it in mid ocean, so that allhis crew were drowned, while he himself was driven by wind and waveson to my island. I got fond of him and cherished him, and had set myheart on making him immortal, so that he should never grow old all hisdays; still I cannot cross Jove, nor bring his counsels to nothing;therefore, if he insists upon it, let the man go beyond the seasagain; but I cannot send him anywhere myself for I have neitherships nor men who can take him. Nevertheless I will readily give himsuch advice, in all good faith, as will be likely to bring himsafely to his own country."
3.  Thus roundly did they rate one another on the smooth pavement infront of the doorway, and when Antinous saw what was going on helaughed heartily and said to the others, "This is the finest sportthat you ever saw; heaven never yet sent anything like it into thishouse. The stranger and Irus have quarreled and are going to fight,let us set them on to do so at once."
4、  Meanwhile Ulysses and the swineherd were eating their supper inthe hut, and the men supped with them. As soon as they had had toeat and drink, Ulysses began trying to prove the swineherd and seewhether he would continue to treat him kindly, and ask him to stayon at the station or pack him off to the city; so he said:
5、  BOOK XXIII.

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  • 徐清清 08-07

      BOOK XX.

  • 刘士毅 08-07

      But Penelope lay in her own room upstairs unable to eat or drink,and wondering whether her brave son would escape, or be overpowered bythe wicked suitors. Like a lioness caught in the toils with huntsmenhemming her in on every side she thought and thought till she sankinto a slumber, and lay on her bed bereft of thought and motion.

  • 亚历山德拉罗伯森 08-07

       Thus spoke the daughter of Jove, and they obeyed her saying. Menservants poured water over the hands of the guests, while pages filledthe mixing-bowls with wine and water, and handed it round after givingevery man his drink-offering; then they threw the tongues of thevictims into the fire, and stood up to make their drink-offerings.When they had made their offerings and had drunk each as much as hewas minded, Minerva and Telemachus were forgoing on board theirship, but Nestor caught them up at once and stayed them.

  • 雷言 08-07

      As he spoke he made a sign with his eyebrows, and Telemachusgirded on his sword, grasped his spear, and stood armed beside hisfather's seat.

  • 王丰著 08-06

    {  As he spoke he lashed his horses and they started off at fullspeed through the town towards the open country. They swayed theyoke upon their necks and travelled the whole day long till the sunset and darkness was over all the land. Then they reached Pherae,where Diocles lived who was son of Ortilochus, the son of Alpheus.There they passed the night and were treated hospitably. When thechild of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, they again yoked theirhorses and their places in the chariot. They drove out through theinner gateway and under the echoing gatehouse of the outer court. ThenPisistratus lashed his horses on and they flew forward nothingloath; ere long they came to Pylos, and then Telemachus said:

  • 巴托丽 08-05

      But Minerva would not let the suitors for one moment cease theirinsolence, for she wanted Ulysses to become even more bitter againstthem; she therefore set Eurymachus son of Polybus on to gibe at him,which made the others laugh. "Listen to me," said he, "you suitorsof Queen Penelope, that I may speak even as I am minded. It is not fornothing that this man has come to the house of Ulysses; I believethe light has not been coming from the torches, but from his own head-for his hair is all gone, every bit of it."}

  • 牛治华 08-05

      "It was day-break by the time she had done speaking, so shedressed me in my shirt and cloak. As for herself she threw a beautifullight gossamer fabric over her shoulders, fastening it with a goldengirdle round her waist, and she covered her head with a mantle. Then Iwent about among the men everywhere all over the house, and spokekindly to each of them man by man: 'You must not lie sleeping here anylonger,' said I to them, 'we must be going, for Circe has told meall about it.' And this they did as I bade them.

  • 刘海锋 08-05

      "Stranger," replied Eumaeus, "as regards your question: sit still,make yourself comfortable, drink your wine, and listen to me. Thenights are now at their longest; there is plenty of time both forsleeping and sitting up talking together; you ought not to go to bedtill bed time, too much sleep is as bad as too little; if any one ofthe others wishes to go to bed let him leave us and do so; he can thentake my master's pigs out when he has done breakfast in the morning.We two will sit here eating and drinking in the hut, and telling oneanother stories about our misfortunes; for when a man has sufferedmuch, and been buffeted about in the world, he takes pleasure inrecalling the memory of sorrows that have long gone by. As regardsyour question, then, my tale is as follows:

  • 罗思明 08-04

       They therefore aimed straight in front of them and threw theirspears. Ulysses killed Demoptolemus, Telemachus Euryades, EumaeusElatus, while the stockman killed Pisander. These all bit the dust,and as the others drew back into a corner Ulysses and his men rushedforward and regained their spears by drawing them from the bodies ofthe dead.

  • 曾丽珍 08-02

    {  The others all agreed, but Ulysses, to throw them off the scent,said, "Sirs, an old man like myself, worn out with suffering, cannothold his own against a young one; but my irrepressible belly urgesme on, though I know it can only end in my getting a drubbing. Youmust swear, however that none of you will give me a foul blow tofavour Irus and secure him the victory."

  • 张良勋 08-02

      "Then I took my sword of bronze and slung it over my shoulders; Ialso took my bow, and told Eurylochus to come back with me and show methe way. But he laid hold of me with both his hands and spokepiteously, saying, 'Sir, do not force me to go with you, but let mestay here, for I know you will not bring one of them back with you,nor even return alive yourself; let us rather see if we cannotescape at any rate with the few that are left us, for we may stillsave our lives.'

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