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im体育是哪个平台好 注册

im体育是哪个平台好注册

类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:闫兴涛 大小:7y3rQDMl79585KB 下载:BXDXsFlB14678次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:BjrJsZYi64437条
日期:2020-08-06 06:40:33
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  When she had done speaking Eumaeus went back to the suitors, forhe had explained everything. Then he went up to Telemachus and said inhis ear so that none could overhear him, "My dear sir, I will now goback to the pigs, to see after your property and my own business.You will look to what is going on here, but above all be careful tokeep out of danger, for there are many who bear you ill will. May Jovebring them to a bad end before they do us a mischief."
2.  And Ulysses answered, "A man, goddess, may know a great deal, butyou are so constantly changing your appearance that when he meetsyou it is a hard matter for him to know whether it is you or not. Thismuch, however, I know exceedingly well; you were very kind to me aslong as we Achaeans were fighting before Troy, but from the day onwhich we went on board ship after having sacked the city of Priam, andheaven dispersed us- from that day, Minerva, I saw no more of you, andcannot ever remember your coming to my ship to help me in adifficulty; I had to wander on sick and sorry till the godsdelivered me from evil and I reached the city of the Phaeacians, whereyou encouraged me and took me into the town. And now, I beseech you inyour father's name, tell me the truth, for I do not believe I amreally back in Ithaca. I am in some other country and you aremocking me and deceiving me in all you have been saying. Tell methen truly, have I really got back to my own country?"
3.  Then Ulysses answered, "madam, wife of Ulysses, since you persist inasking me about my family, I will answer, no matter what it costsme: people must expect to be pained when they have been exiles as longas I have, and suffered as much among as many peoples. Nevertheless,as regards your question I will tell you all you ask. There is afair and fruitful island in mid-ocean called Crete; it is thicklypeopled and there are nine cities in it: the people speak manydifferent languages which overlap one another, for there are Achaeans,brave Eteocretans, Dorians of three-fold race, and noble Pelasgi.There is a great town there, Cnossus, where Minos reigned who everynine years had a conference with Jove himself. Minos was father toDeucalion, whose son I am, for Deucalion had two sons Idomeneus andmyself. Idomeneus sailed for Troy, and I, who am the younger, amcalled Aethon; my brother, however, was at once the older and the morevaliant of the two; hence it was in Crete that I saw Ulysses andshowed him hospitality, for the winds took him there as he was onhis way to Troy, carrying him out of his course from cape Malea andleaving him in Amnisus off the cave of Ilithuia, where the harboursare difficult to enter and he could hardly find shelter from the windsthat were then xaging. As soon as he got there he went into the townand asked for Idomeneus, claiming to be his old and valued friend, butIdomeneus had already set sail for Troy some ten or twelve daysearlier, so I took him to my own house and showed him every kind ofhospitality, for I had abundance of everything. Moreover, I fed themen who were with him with barley meal from the public store, andgot subscriptions of wine and oxen for them to sacrifice to theirheart's content. They stayed with me twelve days, for there was a galeblowing from the North so strong that one could hardly keep one's feeton land. I suppose some unfriendly god had raised it for them, buton the thirteenth day the wind dropped, and they got away."
4.  This was what he said, and more than half raised a loud shout, andat once left the assembly. But the rest stayed where they were, forthe speech of Halitherses displeased them, and they sided withEupeithes; they therefore hurried off for their armour, and whenthey had armed themselves, they met together in front of the city, andEupeithes led them on in their folly. He thought he was going toavenge the murder of his son, whereas in truth he was never to return,but was himself to perish in his attempt.
5.  AND NOW, as Dawn rose from her couch beside Tithonus- harbinger oflight alike to mortals and immortals- the gods met in council and withthem, Jove the lord of thunder, who is their king. Thereon Minervabegan to tell them of the many sufferings of Ulysses, for she pitiedhim away there in the house of the nymph Calypso.
6.  They were astounded when they heard this, for they had made surethat Telemachus had not gone to the city of Neleus. They thought hewas only away somewhere on the farms, and was with the sheep, orwith the swineherd; so Antinous said, "When did he go? Tell metruly, and what young men did he take with him? Were they freemen orhis own bondsmen- for he might manage that too? Tell me also, didyou let him have the ship of your own free will because he askedyou, or did he take it without yourleave?"

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1.  "Alcinous," answered Ulysses, "there is a time for makingspeeches, and a time for going to bed; nevertheless, since you sodesire, I will not refrain from telling you the still sadder tale ofthose of my comrades who did not fall fighting with the Trojans, butperished on their return, through the treachery of a wicked woman.
2.  "Now off their harbour there lies a wooded and fertile island notquite close to the land of the Cyclopes, but still not far. It isoverrun with wild goats, that breed there in great numbers and arenever disturbed by foot of man; for sportsmen- who as a rule willsuffer so much hardship in forest or among mountain precipices- do notgo there, nor yet again is it ever ploughed or fed down, but it lies awilderness untilled and unsown from year to year, and has no livingthing upon it but only goats. For the Cyclopes have no ships, noryet shipwrights who could make ships for them; they cannot thereforego from city to city, or sail over the sea to one another's country aspeople who have ships can do; if they had had these they would havecolonized the island, for it is a very good one, and would yieldeverything in due season. There are meadows that in some places comeright down to the sea shore, well watered and full of lusciousgrass; grapes would do there excellently; there is level land forploughing, and it would always yield heavily at harvest time, forthe soil is deep. There is a good harbour where no cables arewanted, nor yet anchors, nor need a ship be moored, but all one has todo is to beach one's vessel and stay there till the wind becomesfair for putting out to sea again. At the head of the harbour there isa spring of clear water coming out of a cave, and there are poplarsgrowing all round it.
3.  "We sailed hence, always in much distress, till we came to theland of the lawless and inhuman Cyclopes. Now the Cyclopes neitherplant nor plough, but trust in providence, and live on such wheat,barley, and grapes as grow wild without any kind of tillage, and theirwild grapes yield them wine as the sun and the rain may grow them.They have no laws nor assemblies of the people, but live in caves onthe tops of high mountains; each is lord and master in his family, andthey take no account of their neighbours.
4.  "Alas," said he to himself, "what kind of people have I comeamongst? Are they cruel, savage, and uncivilized, or hospitable andhumane? I seem to hear the voices of young women, and they soundlike those of the nymphs that haunt mountain tops, or springs ofrivers and meadows of green grass. At any rate I am among a race ofmen and women. Let me try if I cannot manage to get a look at them."
5.  Thus did he speak, and they went on board even as he had said. Butas Telemachus was thus busied, praying also and sacrificing to Minervain the ship's stern, there came to him a man from a distant country, aseer, who was flying from Argos because he had killed a man. He wasdescended from Melampus, who used to live in Pylos, the land of sheep;he was rich and owned a great house, but he was driven into exile bythe great and powerful king Neleus. Neleus seized his goods and heldthem for a whole year, during which he was a close prisoner in thehouse of king Phylacus, and in much distress of mind both on accountof the daughter of Neleus and because he was haunted by a great sorrowthat dread Erinyes had laid upon him. In the end, however, heescaped with his life, drove the cattle from Phylace to Pylos, avengedthe wrong that had been done him, and gave the daughter of Neleus tohis brother. Then he left the country and went to Argos, where itwas ordained that he should reign over much people. There hemarried, established himself, and had two famous sons Antiphates andMantius. Antiphates became father of Oicleus, and Oicleus ofAmphiaraus, who was dearly loved both by Jove and by Apollo, but hedid not live to old age, for he was killed in Thebes by reason of awoman's gifts. His sons were Alcmaeon and Amphilochus. Mantius, theother son of Melampus, was father to Polypheides and Cleitus.Aurora, throned in gold, carried off Cleitus for his beauty's sake,that he might dwell among the immortals, but Apollo made Polypheidesthe greatest seer in the whole world now that Amphiaraus was dead.He quarrelled with his father and went to live in Hyperesia, wherehe remained and prophesied for all men.
6.  "The first ghost 'that came was that of my comrade Elpenor, for hehad not yet been laid beneath the earth. We had left his bodyunwaked and unburied in Circe's house, for we had had too much else todo. I was very sorry for him, and cried when I saw him: 'Elpenor,'said I, 'how did you come down here into this gloom and darkness?You have here on foot quicker than I have with my ship.'

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1.  Then Theoclymenus said, 'And what, my dear young friend, is tobecome of me? To whose house, among all your chief men, am I torepair? or shall I go straight to your own house and to your mother?"
2.  "On this Thoas son of Andraemon threw off his cloak and set outrunning to the ships, whereon I took the cloak and lay in itcomfortably enough till morning. Would that I were still young andstrong as I was in those days, for then some one of you swineherdswould give me a cloak both out of good will and for the respect due toa brave soldier; but now people look down upon me because my clothesare shabby."
3.  Then she called her maids and said, "Stay where you are, yougirls. Can you not see a man without running away from him? Do youtake him for a robber or a murderer? Neither he nor any one else cancome here to do us Phaeacians any harm, for we are dear to the gods,and live apart on a land's end that juts into the sounding sea, andhave nothing to do with any other people. This is only some poor manwho has lost his way, and we must be kind to him, for strangers andforeigners in distress are under Jove's protection, and will take whatthey can get and be thankful; so, girls, give the poor fellowsomething to eat and drink, and wash him in the stream at some placethat is sheltered from the wind."
4.  "'Let me tell you,' said I, 'whichever of the goddesses you mayhappen to be, that I am not staying here of my own accord, but musthave offended the gods that live in heaven. Tell me, therefore, forthe gods know everything. which of the immortals it is that ishindering me in this way, and tell me also how I may sail the sea soas to reach my home.'
5.   "Very well," replied Telemachus, "go home when you have had yourdinner, and in the morning come here with the victims we are tosacrifice for the day. Leave the rest to heaven and me."
6.  "And I saw Leda the wife of Tyndarus, who bore him two famoussons, Castor breaker of horses, and Pollux the mighty boxer. Boththese heroes are lying under the earth, though they are still alive,for by a special dispensation of Jove, they die and come to lifeagain, each one of them every other day throughout all time, andthey have the rank of gods.

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1.  On this she led the way, and Ulysses followed in her steps; butnot one of the Phaecians could see him as he passed through the cityin the midst of them; for the great goddess Minerva in her good willtowards him had hidden him in a thick cloud of darkness. He admiredtheir harbours, ships, places of assembly, and the lofty walls ofthe city, which, with the palisade on top of them, were very striking,and when they reached the king's house Minerva said:
2.  "Nestor son of Neleus," answered Telemachus, "honour to theAchaean name, the Achaeans applaud Orestes and his name will livethrough all time for he has avenged his father nobly. Would thatheaven might grant me to do like vengeance on the insolence of thewicked suitors, who are ill treating me and plotting my ruin; butthe gods have no such happiness in store for me and for my father,so we must bear it as best we may."
3.  The swineherd went back when he heard this, and Penelope said as shesaw him cross the threshold, "Why do you not bring him here,Eumaeus? Is he afraid that some one will ill-treat him, or is he shyof coming inside the house at all? Beggars should not be shamefaced."
4、  They all held their peace until Amphinomus rose to speak. He was theson of Nisus, who was son to king Aretias, and he was foremost amongall the suitors from the wheat-growing and well grassed island ofDulichium; his conversation, moreover, was more agreeable toPenelope than that of any of the other for he was a man of goodnatural disposition. "My friends," said he, speaking to them plainlyand in all honestly, "I am not in favour of killing Telemachus. Itis a heinous thing to kill one who is of noble blood. Let us firsttake counsel of the gods, and if the oracles of Jove advise it, I willboth help to kill him myself, and will urge everyone else to do so;but if they dissuade us, I would have you hold your hands."
5、  "And I saw Tityus son of Gaia stretched upon the plain andcovering some nine acres of ground. Two vultures on either side of himwere digging their beaks into his liver, and he kept on trying to beatthem off with his hands, but could not; for he had violated Jove'smistress Leto as she was going through Panopeus on her way to Pytho.

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  • 詹皇生 08-05

      THEN Mercury of Cyllene summoned the ghosts of the suitors, and inhis hand he held the fair golden wand with which he seals men's eyesin sleep or wakes them just as he pleases; with this he roused theghosts and led them, while they followed whining and gibberingbehind him. As bats fly squealing in the hollow of some great cave,when one of them has fallen out of the cluster in which they hang,even so did the ghosts whine and squeal as Mercury the healer ofsorrow led them down into the dark abode of death. When they hadpassed the waters of Oceanus and the rock Leucas, they came to thegates of the sun and the land of dreams, whereon they reached themeadow of asphodel where dwell the souls and shadows of them thatcan labour no more.

  • 潘立铭 08-05

      "Farewell, queen," said he, "henceforward and for ever, till age anddeath, the common lot of mankind, lay their hands upon you. I now takemy leave; be happy in this house with your children, your people,and with king Alcinous."

  • 吴剑鹏 08-05

       "My good nurse," answered Penelope, "you must be mad. The godssometimes send some very sensible people out of their minds, andmake foolish people become sensible. This is what they must havebeen doing to you; for you always used to be a reasonable person.Why should you thus mock me when I have trouble enough already-talking such nonsense, and waking me up out of a sweet sleep thathad taken possession of my eyes and closed them? I have never slept sosoundly from the day my poor husband went to that city with theill-omened name. Go back again into the women's room; if it had beenany one else, who had woke me up to bring me such absurd news I shouldhave sent her away with a severe scolding. As it is, your age shallprotect you."

  • 亚瑟登纳姆 08-05

      "When they reached Circe's house they found it built of cutstones, on a site that could be seen from far, in the middle of theforest. There were wild mountain wolves and lions prowling all roundit- poor bewitched creatures whom she had tamed by her enchantmentsand drugged into subjection. They did not attack my men, but waggedtheir great tails, fawned upon them, and rubbed their noses lovinglyagainst them. As hounds crowd round their master when they see himcoming from dinner- for they know he will bring them something- evenso did these wolves and lions with their great claws fawn upon my men,but the men were terribly frightened at seeing such strange creatures.Presently they reached the gates of the goddess's house, and as theystood there they could hear Circe within, singing most beautifullyas she worked at her loom, making a web so fine, so soft, and ofsuch dazzling colours as no one but a goddess could weave. On thisPolites, whom I valued and trusted more than any other of my men,said, 'There is some one inside working at a loom and singing mostbeautifully; the whole place resounds with it, let us call her and seewhether she is woman or goddess.'

  • 秘舒 08-04

    {  As he spoke he sprang from his seat, threw his crimson cloak fromhim, and took his sword from his shoulder. First he set the axes ina row, in a long groove which he had dug for them, and had Wadestraight by line. Then he stamped the earth tight round them, andeveryone was surprised when they saw him set up so orderly, thoughhe had never seen anything of the kind before. This done, he went onto the pavement to make trial of the bow; thrice did he tug at it,trying with all his might to draw the string, and thrice he had toleave off, though he had hoped to string the bow and shoot through theiron. He was trying for the fourth time, and would have strung ithad not Ulysses made a sign to check him in spite of all hiseagerness. So he said:

  • 赵晓菁 08-03

      BOOK IX.}

  • 杨汛童 08-03

      "Thus spoke Eurylochus, and the men approved his words. Now thecattle, so fair and goodly, were feeding not far from the ship; themen, therefore drove in the best of them, and they all stood roundthem saying their prayers, and using young oak-shoots instead ofbarley-meal, for there was no barley left. When they had donepraying they killed the cows and dressed their carcasses; they cut outthe thigh bones, wrapped them round in two layers of fat, and set somepieces of raw meat on top of them. They had no wine with which to makedrink-offerings over the sacrifice while it was cooking, so theykept pouring on a little water from time to time while the inwardmeats were being grilled; then, when the thigh bones were burned andthey had tasted the inward meats, they cut the rest up small and putthe pieces upon the spits.

  • 陈奇 08-03

      When the bright star that heralds the approach of dawn began toshow. the ship drew near to land. Now there is in Ithaca a haven ofthe old merman Phorcys, which lies between two points that break theline of the sea and shut the harbour in. These shelter it from thestorms of wind and sea that rage outside, so that, when once withinit, a ship may lie without being even moored. At the head of thisharbour there is a large olive tree, and at no distance a fineoverarching cavern sacred to the nymphs who are called Naiads. Thereare mixing-bowls within it and wine-jars of stone, and the bees hivethere. Moreover, there are great looms of stone on which the nymphsweave their robes of sea purple- very curious to see- and at all timesthere is water within it. It has two entrances, one facing North bywhich mortals can go down into the cave, while the other comes fromthe South and is more mysterious; mortals cannot possibly get in byit, it is the way taken by the gods.

  • 罗秀文 08-02

       "Thus through the livelong day to the going down of the sun wefeasted our fill on meat and drink, but when the sun went down andit came on dark, we camped upon the beach. When the child ofmorning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, I bade my men on board andloose the hawsers. Then they took their places and smote the greysea with their oars; so we sailed on with sorrow in our hearts, butglad to have escaped death though we had lost our comrades.

  • 沈黎晖 07-31

    {  "What do you think of this man, O Phaecians? Is he not tall and goodlooking, and is he not Clever? True, he is my own guest, but all ofyou share in the distinction. Do not he a hurry to send him away,nor niggardly in the presents you make to one who is in such greatneed, for heaven has blessed all of you with great abundance."

  • 赵云龙 07-31

      "Firstly, then, I will tell you my name that you too may know it,and one day, if I outlive this time of sorrow, may become my thereguests though I live so far away from all of you. I am Ulysses sonof Laertes, reknowned among mankind for all manner of subtlety, sothat my fame ascends to heaven. I live in Ithaca, where there is ahigh mountain called Neritum, covered with forests; and not far fromit there is a group of islands very near to one another- Dulichium,Same, and the wooded island of Zacynthus. It lies squat on thehorizon, all highest up in the sea towards the sunset, while theothers lie away from it towards dawn. It is a rugged island, but itbreeds brave men, and my eyes know none that they better love tolook upon. The goddess Calypso kept me with her in her cave, andwanted me to marry her, as did also the cunning Aeaean goddessCirce; but they could neither of them persuade me, for there isnothing dearer to a man than his own country and his parents, andhowever splendid a home he may have in a foreign country, if it be farfrom father or mother, he does not care about it. Now, however, I willtell you of the many hazardous adventures which by Jove's will I metwith on my return from Troy.

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