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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:赵子靓 大小:5BowLwnk65773KB 下载:3ss3VUKd79566次
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日期:2020-08-06 19:10:46
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Then Minerva said, "Yes, father stranger, I will show you thehouse you want, for Alcinous lives quite close to my own father. Iwill go before you and show the way, but say not a word as you go, anddo not look at any man, nor ask him questions; for the people herecannot abide strangers, and do not like men who come from some otherplace. They are a sea-faring folk, and sail the seas by the grace ofNeptune in ships that glide along like thought, or as a bird in theair."
2.  "When they reached Circe's house they found it built of cutstones, on a site that could be seen from far, in the middle of theforest. There were wild mountain wolves and lions prowling all roundit- poor bewitched creatures whom she had tamed by her enchantmentsand drugged into subjection. They did not attack my men, but waggedtheir great tails, fawned upon them, and rubbed their noses lovinglyagainst them. As hounds crowd round their master when they see himcoming from dinner- for they know he will bring them something- evenso did these wolves and lions with their great claws fawn upon my men,but the men were terribly frightened at seeing such strange creatures.Presently they reached the gates of the goddess's house, and as theystood there they could hear Circe within, singing most beautifullyas she worked at her loom, making a web so fine, so soft, and ofsuch dazzling colours as no one but a goddess could weave. On thisPolites, whom I valued and trusted more than any other of my men,said, 'There is some one inside working at a loom and singing mostbeautifully; the whole place resounds with it, let us call her and seewhether she is woman or goddess.'
3.  "She is still at the house," replied Eumaeus, "grieving and breakingher heart, and doing nothing but weep, both night and daycontinually."
4.  As for Melanthius, they took him through the cloister into the innercourt. There they cut off his nose and his ears; they drew out hisvitals and gave them to the dogs raw, and then in their fury theycut off his hands and his feet.
5.  When he had thus spoken, he went back to the house and took the seatthat he had left. Presently, his two servants followed him inside.
6.  "'My son,' she answered, 'most ill-fated of all mankind, it is notProserpine that is beguiling you, but all people are like this whenthey are dead. The sinews no longer hold the flesh and bones together;these perish in the fierceness of consuming fire as soon as life hasleft the body, and the soul flits away as though it were a dream. Now,however, go back to the light of day as soon as you can, and noteall these things that you may tell them to your wife hereafter.'

计划指导

1.  But Pisistratus said, "No matter what hurry we are in we cannotdrive in the dark. It will be morning soon; wait till Menelaus hasbrought his presents and put them in the chariot for us; and let himsay good-bye to us in the usual way. So long as he lives a guestshould never forget a host who has shown him kindness."
2.  Then, when they had finished their work and the meal was ready, theyate it, and every man had his full share so that all were satisfied.As soon as they had had enough to eat and drink, they laid down torest and enjoyed the boon of sleep.
3.  Thus he chided with his heart, and checked it into endurance, but hetossed about as one who turns a paunch full of blood and fat infront of a hot fire, doing it first on one side and then on the other,that he may get it cooked as soon as possible, even so did he turnhimself about from side to side, thinking all the time how, singlehanded as he was, he should contrive to kill so large a body of men asthe wicked suitors. But by and by Minerva came down from heaven in thelikeness of a woman, and hovered over his head saying, "My poorunhappy man, why do you lie awake in this way? This is your house:your wife is safe inside it, and so is your son who is just such ayoung man as any father may be proud of."
4.  "We were frightened out of our senses by his loud voice andmonstrous form, but I managed to say, 'We are Achaeans on our way homefrom Troy, but by the will of Jove, and stress of weather, we havebeen driven far out of our course. We are the people of Agamemnon, sonof Atreus, who has won infinite renown throughout the whole world,by sacking so great a city and killing so many people. We thereforehumbly pray you to show us some hospitality, and otherwise make ussuch presents as visitors may reasonably expect. May your excellencyfear the wrath of heaven, for we are your suppliants, and Jove takesall respectable travellers under his protection, for he is the avengerof all suppliants and foreigners in distress.'
5.  "Then some malicious god conveyed Ulysses to the upland farm wherehis swineherd lives. Thither presently came also his son, returningfrom a voyage to Pylos, and the two came to the town when they hadhatched their plot for our destruction. Telemachus came first, andthen after him, accompanied by the swineherd, came Ulysses, clad inrags and leaning on a staff as though he were some miserable oldbeggar. He came so unexpectedly that none of us knew him, not even theolder ones among us, and we reviled him and threw things at him. Heendured both being struck and insulted without a word, though he wasin his own house; but when the will of Aegis-bearing Jove inspiredhim, he and Telemachus took the armour and hid it in an inner chamber,bolting the doors behind them. Then he cunningly made his wife offerhis bow and a quantity of iron to be contended for by us ill-fatedsuitors; and this was the beginning of our end, for not one of uscould string the bow- nor nearly do so. When it was about to reach thehands of Ulysses, we all of us shouted out that it should not be givenhim, no matter what he might say, but Telemachus insisted on hishaving it. When he had got it in his hands he strung it with easeand sent his arrow through the iron. Then he stood on the floor of thecloister and poured his arrows on the ground, glaring fiercely abouthim. First he killed Antinous, and then, aiming straight before him,he let fly his deadly darts and they fell thick on one another. It wasplain that some one of the gods was helping them, for they fell uponus with might and main throughout the cloisters, and there was ahideous sound of groaning as our brains were being battered in, andthe ground seethed with our blood. This, Agamemnon, is how we cameby our end, and our bodies are lying still un-cared for in the houseof Ulysses, for our friends at home do not yet know what has happened,so that they cannot lay us out and wash the black blood from ourwounds, making moan over us according to the offices due to thedeparted."
6.  On this the maids left off running away and began calling oneanother back. They made Ulysses sit down in the shelter as Nausicaahad told them, and brought him a shirt and cloak. They also broughthim the little golden cruse of oil, and told him to go wash in thestream. But Ulysses said, "Young women, please to stand a little onone side that I may wash the brine from my shoulders and anoint myselfwith oil, for it is long enough since my skin has had a drop of oilupon it. I cannot wash as long as you all keep standing there. I amashamed to strip before a number of good-looking young women."

推荐功能

1.  The company then laid their hands upon the good things that werebefore them, but as soon as they had had enough to eat and drink,the muse inspired Demodocus to sing the feats of heroes, and moreespecially a matter that was then in the mouths of all men, to wit,the quarrel between Ulysses and Achilles, and the fierce words thatthey heaped on one another as they gat together at a banquet. ButAgamemnon was glad when he heard his chieftains quarrelling with oneanother, for Apollo had foretold him this at Pytho when he crossed thestone floor to consult the oracle. Here was the beginning of theevil that by the will of Jove fell both Danaans and Trojans.
2.  When Menelaus heard this he immediately told his wife and servantsto prepare a sufficient dinner from what there might be in thehouse. At this moment Eteoneus joined him, for he lived close by andhad just got up; so Menelaus told him to light the fire and cooksome meat, which he at once did. Then Menelaus went down into hisfragrant store room, not alone, but Helen went too, withMegapenthes. When he reached the place where the treasures of hishouse were kept, he selected a double cup, and told his sonMegapenthes to bring also a silver mixing-bowl. Meanwhile Helen wentto the chest where she kept the lovely dresses which she had made withher own hands, and took out one that was largest and mostbeautifully enriched with embroidery; it glittered like a star, andlay at the very bottom of the chest. Then they all came back throughthe house again till they got to Telemachus, and Menelaus said,"Telemachus, may Jove, the mighty husband of Juno, bring you safelyhome according to your desire. I will now present you with thefinest and most precious piece of plate in all my house. It is amixing-bowl of pure silver, except the rim, which is inlaid with gold,and it is the work of Vulcan. Phaedimus king of the Sidonians mademe a present of it in the course of a visit that I paid him while Iwas on my return home. I should like to give it to you."
3.  "I stuck to the ship till the sea knocked her sides from her keel(which drifted about by itself) and struck the mast out of her inthe direction of the keel; but there was a backstay of stoutox-thong still hanging about it, and with this I lashed the mast andkeel together, and getting astride of them was carried wherever thewinds chose to take me.
4.  Then Ulysses said: "Pray, Alcinous, do not take any such notion intoyour head. I have nothing of the immortal about me, neither in bodynor mind, and most resemble those among you who are the mostafflicted. Indeed, were I to tell you all that heaven has seen fitto lay upon me, you would say that I was still worse off than theyare. Nevertheless, let me sup in spite of sorrow, for an empty stomachis a very importunate thing, and thrusts itself on a man's notice nomatter how dire is his distress. I am in great trouble, yet it insiststhat I shall eat and drink, bids me lay aside all memory of my sorrowsand dwell only on the due replenishing of itself. As for yourselves,do as you propose, and at break of day set about helping me to gethome. I shall be content to die if I may first once more behold myproperty, my bondsmen, and all the greatness of my house."
5.   "Thus spoke Proteus, and I was broken hearted as I heard him. Isat down upon the sands and wept; I felt as though I could no longerbear to live nor look upon the light of the sun. Presently, when I hadhad my fill of weeping and writhing upon the ground, the old man ofthe sea said, 'Son of Atreus, do not waste any more time in cryingso bitterly; it can do no manner of good; find your way home as fastas ever you can, for Aegisthus be still alive, and even though Oresteshas beforehand with you in kilting him, you may yet come in for hisfuneral.'
6.  This was what she said, and Ulysses was glad when he heard hertrying to get presents out of the suitors, and flattering them withfair words which he knew she did not mean.

应用

1.  They were astounded when they heard this, for they had made surethat Telemachus had not gone to the city of Neleus. They thought hewas only away somewhere on the farms, and was with the sheep, orwith the swineherd; so Antinous said, "When did he go? Tell metruly, and what young men did he take with him? Were they freemen orhis own bondsmen- for he might manage that too? Tell me also, didyou let him have the ship of your own free will because he askedyou, or did he take it without yourleave?"
2.  "Ulysses," said he, "now that you have reached my house I doubtnot you will get home without further misadventure no matter howmuch you have suffered in the past. To you others, however, who comehere night after night to drink my choicest wine and listen to mybard, I would insist as follows. Our guest has already packed up theclothes, wrought gold, and other valuables which you have broughtfor his acceptance; let us now, therefore, present him further, eachone of us, with a large tripod and a cauldron. We will recoupourselves by the levy of a general rate; for private individualscannot be expected to bear the burden of such a handsome present."
3.  "Then Mercury went back to high Olympus passing over the woodedisland; but I fared onward to the house of Circe, and my heart wasclouded with care as I walked along. When I got to the gates I stoodthere and called the goddess, and as soon as she heard me she camedown, opened the door, and asked me to come in; so I followed her-much troubled in my mind. She set me on a richly decorated seat inlaidwith silver, there was a footstool also under my feet, and she mixed amess in a golden goblet for me to drink; but she drugged it, for shemeant me mischief. When she had given it me, and I had drunk itwithout its charming me, she struck she, struck me with her wand.'There now,' she cried, 'be off to the pigsty, and make your lair withthe rest of them.'
4、  Then Ulysses answered, "madam, wife of Ulysses, since you persist inasking me about my family, I will answer, no matter what it costsme: people must expect to be pained when they have been exiles as longas I have, and suffered as much among as many peoples. Nevertheless,as regards your question I will tell you all you ask. There is afair and fruitful island in mid-ocean called Crete; it is thicklypeopled and there are nine cities in it: the people speak manydifferent languages which overlap one another, for there are Achaeans,brave Eteocretans, Dorians of three-fold race, and noble Pelasgi.There is a great town there, Cnossus, where Minos reigned who everynine years had a conference with Jove himself. Minos was father toDeucalion, whose son I am, for Deucalion had two sons Idomeneus andmyself. Idomeneus sailed for Troy, and I, who am the younger, amcalled Aethon; my brother, however, was at once the older and the morevaliant of the two; hence it was in Crete that I saw Ulysses andshowed him hospitality, for the winds took him there as he was onhis way to Troy, carrying him out of his course from cape Malea andleaving him in Amnisus off the cave of Ilithuia, where the harboursare difficult to enter and he could hardly find shelter from the windsthat were then xaging. As soon as he got there he went into the townand asked for Idomeneus, claiming to be his old and valued friend, butIdomeneus had already set sail for Troy some ten or twelve daysearlier, so I took him to my own house and showed him every kind ofhospitality, for I had abundance of everything. Moreover, I fed themen who were with him with barley meal from the public store, andgot subscriptions of wine and oxen for them to sacrifice to theirheart's content. They stayed with me twelve days, for there was a galeblowing from the North so strong that one could hardly keep one's feeton land. I suppose some unfriendly god had raised it for them, buton the thirteenth day the wind dropped, and they got away."
5、  As he spoke he cut off the first piece and offered it as a burntsacrifice to the immortal gods; then he made them a drink-offering,put the cup in the hands of Ulysses, and sat down to his ownportion. Mesaulius brought them their bread; the swineherd hadbought this man on his own account from among the Taphians duringhis master's absence, and had paid for him with his own moneywithout saying anything either to his mistress or Laertes. They thenlaid their hands upon the good things that were before them, andwhen they had had enough to eat and drink, Mesaulius took away whatwas left of the bread, and they all went to bed after having made ahearty supper.

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  • 陆晓春 08-05

      Then Ulysses said: "Pray, Alcinous, do not take any such notion intoyour head. I have nothing of the immortal about me, neither in bodynor mind, and most resemble those among you who are the mostafflicted. Indeed, were I to tell you all that heaven has seen fitto lay upon me, you would say that I was still worse off than theyare. Nevertheless, let me sup in spite of sorrow, for an empty stomachis a very importunate thing, and thrusts itself on a man's notice nomatter how dire is his distress. I am in great trouble, yet it insiststhat I shall eat and drink, bids me lay aside all memory of my sorrowsand dwell only on the due replenishing of itself. As for yourselves,do as you propose, and at break of day set about helping me to gethome. I shall be content to die if I may first once more behold myproperty, my bondsmen, and all the greatness of my house."

  • 卡拉斯科 08-05

      "'My friends,' said I, 'we have meat and drink in the ship, let usmind, therefore, and not touch the cattle, or we shall suffer forit; for these cattle and sheep belong to the mighty sun, who seesand gives ear to everything. And again they promised that they wouldobey.

  • 王传福 08-05

       Thus did they converse; but the others, when they had finished theirwork and the feast was ready, left off working, and took each hisproper place on the benches and seats. Then they began eating; byand by old Dolius and his sons left their work and came up, fortheir mother, the Sicel woman who looked after Laertes now that he wasgrowing old, had been to fetch them. When they saw Ulysses and werecertain it was he, they stood there lost in astonishment; butUlysses scolded them good-naturedly and said, "Sit down to yourdinner, old man, and never mind about your surprise; we have beenwanting to begin for some time and have been waiting for you."

  • 石文忠 08-05

      Thus did Ulysses sleep, and the young men slept beside him. Butthe swineherd did not like sleeping away from his pigs, so he gotready to go and Ulysses was glad to see that he looked after hisproperty during his master's absence. First he slung his sword overhis brawny shoulders and put on a thick cloak to keep out the wind. Healso took the skin of a large and well fed goat, and a javelin in caseof attack from men or dogs. Thus equipped he went to his rest wherethe pigs were camping under an overhanging rock that gave them shelterfrom the North wind.

  • 蒋晓东 08-04

    {  "The first ghost 'that came was that of my comrade Elpenor, for hehad not yet been laid beneath the earth. We had left his bodyunwaked and unburied in Circe's house, for we had had too much else todo. I was very sorry for him, and cried when I saw him: 'Elpenor,'said I, 'how did you come down here into this gloom and darkness?You have here on foot quicker than I have with my ship.'

  • 符永 08-03

      A maid servant then brought them water in a beautiful golden ewerand poured it into a silver basin for them to wash their hands, andshe drew a clean table beside them. An upper servant brought thembread, and offered them many good things of what there was in thehouse, the carver fetched them plates of all manner of meats and setcups of gold by their side, and a man-servant brought them wine andpoured it out for them.}

  • 刘杰 08-03

      Thus sang the bard, but Ulysses drew his purple mantle over his headand covered his face, for he was ashamed to let the Phaeacians seethat he was weeping. When the bard left off singing he wiped the tearsfrom his eyes, uncovered his face, and, taking his cup, made adrink-offering to the gods; but when the Phaeacians pressedDemodocus to sing further, for they delighted in his lays, thenUlysses again drew his mantle over his head and wept bitterly. Noone noticed his distress except Alcinous, who was sitting near him,and heard the heavy sighs that he was heaving. So he at once said,"Aldermen and town councillors of the Phaeacians, we have had enoughnow, both of the feast, and of the minstrelsy that is its dueaccompaniment; let us proceed therefore to the athletic sports, sothat our guest on his return home may be able to tell his friendshow much we surpass all other nations as boxers, wrestlers, jumpers,and runners."

  • 戴奇 08-03

      "Men of Ithaca," he said, "hear my words. From the day Ulyssesleft us there has been no meeting of our councillors until now; whothen can it be, whether old or young, that finds it so necessary toconvene us? Has he got wind of some host approaching, and does he wishto warn us, or would he speak upon some other matter of public moment?I am sure he is an excellent person, and I hope Jove will grant himhis heart's desire."

  • 不破哲三 08-02

       And Menelaus answered, "Telemachus, if you insist on going I willnot detain you. not like to see a host either too fond of his guest ortoo rude to him. Moderation is best in all things, and not letting aman go when he wants to do so is as bad as telling him to go if hewould like to stay. One should treat a guest well as long as he isin the house and speed him when he wants to leave it. Wait, then, tillI can get your beautiful presents into your chariot, and till you haveyourself seen them. I will tell the women to prepare a sufficientdinner for you of what there may be in the house; it will be at oncemore proper and cheaper for you to get your dinner before settingout on such a long journey. If, moreover, you have a fancy formaking a tour in Hellas or in the Peloponnese, I will yoke myhorses, and will conduct you myself through all our principalcities. No one will send us away empty handed; every one will giveus something- a bronze tripod, a couple of mules, or a gold cup."

  • 沃尔夫冈-伊申格尔 07-31

    {  "'My dear nurse," said Penelope, "do not exult too confidentlyover all this. You know how delighted every one would be to seeUlysses come home- more particularly myself, and the son who hasbeen born to both of us; but what you tell me cannot be really true.It is some god who is angry with the suitors for their greatwickedness, and has made an end of them; for they respected no manin the whole world, neither rich nor poor, who came near them, whocame near them, and they have come to a bad end in consequence oftheir iniquity. Ulysses is dead far away from the Achaean land; hewill never return home again."

  • 袁进琳 07-31

      "I know, Eurynome," replied Penelope, "that you mean well, but donot try and persuade me to wash and to anoint myself, for heavenrobbed me of all my beauty on the day my husband sailed; nevertheless,tell Autonoe and Hippodamia that I want them. They must be with mewhen I am in the cloister; I am not going among the men alone; itwould not be proper for me to do so."

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