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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:邱蓉 大小:K5iYG3VR99622KB 下载:IcndQZyZ51089次
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日期:2020-08-06 07:44:05
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陈杜松

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  I meane not to commend either the one or other, because they donot alwayes fall out to be true; neither are they at all timeslyars. Now, that they prove not all to be true, we can best testifieto our selves. And that they are not alwayes lyars, hath alreadysufficiently bene manifested, by the Discourse of Madame Philomena,and as you shall perceive by mine owne, which next commeth in order tosalute you. Wherefore, I am of this opinion, that in matters of goodlife, and performing honest actions; no dreame is to be fearedpresaging the contrary, neither are good works any way to be hindredby them. Likewise, in matters of bad and wicked quality, althoughour dreames may appeare favourable to us, and our visions flatter uswith prosperous successe: yet let us give no credence unto the best,nor addict our minds to them of contrary Nature. And now we wil.proceed to our Novell.
2.  Loe thus I dye, in jealousie,
3.  When they had spent a long while in this or the like conference,with infinite sweet kisses and embraces intermixed; then she beganagaine in this manner. Deare love (quoth she) cast thy Cloake aboutthee, as I intend to doe with my night mantle, and let us step tothe little window once more, to see whether the flaming fire, whichburned in the Schollers brest (as daily avouched to me in his loveletters) be as yet extinct or no. So going to the window againe, andlooking downe into the Court; there they saw the Scholler dancing inthe snow, to the cold tune of his teeths quivering and chattering, andclapping his armes about his body, which was no pleasing melody tohim. How thinkest thou now sweet heart (saide cannot I make a mandaunce without the sound of a Taber, or of a Bagpipe? yes beleeve meLady (quoth he) I plaine pereive you can, and would be very lothe,that at should exercise your cunning on me.
4.  OF MANY EVILS, YEA, AND OF DEATH, TO DIVERS MEN
5.  Tancrede, to denie what I have done, or to entreate any favourfrom you, is now no part of my disposition: for as the one canlittle availe me, so shall not the other any way advantage me.Moreover, I covet not that you should extend any clemency or kindnesseto me, but by my voluntary confession of the truth do intend (first ofall) to defend mine honour, with reasons sound, good, andsubstantiall, and then vertuously pursue to full effect, thegreatnesse of my minde and constant resolution. True it is, that Ihave loved, and still do, honourable Guiscardo, purposing the likeso long as I shall live, which will be but a small while: but if it bepossible to continue the same affection after death, it is for evervowed to him onely. Nor did mine owne womanish weaknesse so muchthereto induce me, as the matchlesse vertues shining clearly inGuiscardo, and the little respect you had of marrying me againe. Whyroyall Father, you cannot be ignorant, that you being composed offlesh and blood, have begotten a Daughter of the selfe samecomposition, and not made of stone or iron. Moreover, you ought toremember (although now you are farre stept in yeeres) what the Lawesof youth are, and with what difficulty they are to be contradicted.Considering withall, that albeit (during the vigour of your best time)you evermore were exercised in Armes; yet you should likewiseunderstand, that negligence and idle delights, have mighty power,not onely in young people, but also in them of greatest yeares.
6.  The Novell of Madame Eliza being finished, and some-what commendedby the King, in regard of the Tragicall conclusion; Philomena wasenjoyned to proceede next with her discourse. She being overcomewith much compassion, for the hard Fortunes of Noble Gerbino, andhis beautifull Princesse, after an extreame and vehement sighe, thusshe spake. My Tale (worthy Ladies) extendeth not to persons of so highbirth or quality, as they were of whom Madame Eliza gave you relation:yet (peradventure) it may prove to be no lesse pittifull. And now Iremember my selfe, Messina so lately spoken of, is the place wherethis accident also happened.

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1.  When Pedro perceived, that his Wife had spoken nothing but reason,in regard of his over-much neglect towards her, and not using suchHoushold kindnesse, as ought to be betweene Man and Wife, hee returnedher this answer. Well Wife (quoth he) I confesse my fault, andhereafter will labour to amend it; conditionally, that this youth, norany other, may no more visite my House in my absence. Get me thereforesomething to eate, for doubtlesse, this young man and thy selfe fellshort of your Supper, by reason of my so soone returning home. Introth Husband, saide she, we did not eate one bit of any thing, andI will be a true and loyall Wife to thee, so thou wilt be the liketo me. No more words then Wife, replyed Pedro, all is forgotten andforgiven, let us to Supper, and we are all friends. She seeing hisanger was so well appeased, lovingly kissed him, and laying the cloth,set on the supper, which she had provided for her selfe and the youth,and so they supt together merrily, not one unkinde word passingbetweene them. After Supper, the youth was sent away in friendlymanner, and Pedro was alwayes afterward more loving to his Wife,then formerly hee had beene, and no complaint passed on either side,but mutuall joy and Houshold contentment, such as ought to beebetweene Man and Wife.
2.  Many other the like conceits mollested him, sufficient to alterhis determination: but affection was much more prevayling in him,and made him use this consultation. How now Rinuccio? Wilt dare todeny the first request, being mooved to thee by a Gentlewoman, whomthou dearly lovest, and is the onely meanes, whereby to gaineassurance of her gracious favour? Undoubtedly, were I sure to die inthe attempt, yet I will accomplish my promise. And so he went onwith courage to the grave.
3.  Now, notwithstanding the nights obscurity, and impetuous violence ofthe billowes; such as could swimme, made shift to save their livesby swimming. Others caught hold on such things, as by Fortunes favour,floated neerest to them, among whom, distressed Landolpho, desirous tosave his life, if possibly it might be, espied a Chest or Cofferbefore him, ordained (no doubt) to be the meanes of his safety fromdrowning. Now although the day before, he had wished for deathinfinite times, rather then to returne home in such wretchedpoverty; yet, seeing how other men strove for safety of their lives byany helpe, were it never so little, bee tooke advantage of this favouroffred him, and the rather in a necessitie so urgent. Keeping fastupon the Coffer so well as he could, and being driven by the winds andwaves, one while this way, and anon quite contrary, he made shiftfor himselfe till day appeared; when looking every way about him,seeing nothing but clouds, the seas and the Coffer, which one whileshrunke from under him, and another while supported him, accordingas the windes and billowes carried it: all that day and night thushe floated up and downe, drinking more then willingly hee would, butalmost hunger-starved thorow want of foode. The next morning, eitherby the appointment of heaven or power of the Windes, Landolpho who was(well-neere) become a Spundge, holding his armes strongly about theChest, as we have seene some doe, who (dreading drowning) take hold onany the very smallest helpe; drew neere unto the shore of the IlandCorfu, where (by good fortune) a poore woman was scowring disheswith the salt water and sand, to make them (housewife like) neateand cleane.
4.  As yet, she had milke freshly running in both her brests, byreason of her so late delivery in child bed; wherefore shee laydowne unto the two yong Kids, and taking them tenderly in her armes,suffered each of them to sucke a teate, whereof they made not anyrefusall, but tooke them as lovingly as their dammes, and from thattime forward, they made no distinguishing betweene their damme andher. Thus this unfortunate Lady, having found some company in thissolitary desart, fed on herbes and roots, drinking faire runningwater, and weeping silently to her selfe, so often as she remembredher husband, children, and former dayes past in much better manner.Heere she resolved now to live and dye, being at last deprived both ofthe damme and yonger Kids also, by theyr wandering further into theneere adjoyning Woods, according to their naturall inclinations;whereby the poore distressed Ladie became more savage and wilde in herdaily conditions, then otherwise shee would have bene.
5.  When day appeared, and the violent stormes were more mildly appeasedthe Ladie, who seemed well-neere dead, lifted up her head, and began(weake as she was) to call first one, and then another: but sheecalled in vaine, for such as she named were farre enough from her.Wherefore, hearing no answere, nor seeing any one, she wondredgreatly, her feares encreasing then more and more. Raising her selfeso well as shee could, she beheld the Ladies that were of her company,and some other of her women, lying still without any stirring:whereupon, first jogging one, and then another, and calling themseverally by their names; shee found them bereft of understanding, andeven as if they were dead, their hearts were so quayled, and theirfeare so over-ruling, which was no meane dismay to the poore Ladyher selfe. Neverthelesse, necessity now being her best counsellor,seeing her selfe thus all alone, and not knowing in what place sheewas, shee used such meanes to them that were living, that (at thelast) they came to better knowledge of themselves. And being unable toguesse, what was become of the men and Marriners, seeing the Ship alsodriven on the sands, and filled with water, she began with them tolament most greevously: and now it was about the houre of mid day,before they could descry any person on the shore, or any els to pitythem in so urgent a necessity.
6.  HOW TO HAVE CARE OF MARRYING THEMSELVES. AND LIKEWISE TO POORE

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1.  Onely through fond mistrust, he is unjust:
2.  Wearisome is my life to me,
3.  ADDICTED TO CREDULITIE, AND WILL GIVE CREDIT TO EVERY
4.  This strange and uncouth sight, bred in him no meane admiration,as also kinde compassion to the unfortunate woman; out of whichcompassion, sprung an earnest desire, to deliver her (if he could)from a death so full of anguish and horror: but seeing himselfe tobe without Armes, he ran and pluckt up the plant of a Tree, whichhandling as if it had bene a staffe, he opposed himselfe against theDogges and the Knight, who seeing him comming, cryed out in thismanner to him. Anastasio, put not thy selfe in any opposition, butreferre to my Hounds and me, to punish this wicked woman as she hathjustly deserved. And in speaking these words, the Hounds tooke fasthold on her body, so staying her, untill the Knight was come neerer toher, and alighted from his horse: when Anastasio (after some otherangry speeches) spake thus unto him: I cannot tell what or who thouart, albeit thou takest such knowledge of me, yet I must say, thatit is meere cowardize in a Knight, being armed as thou art, to offerto kill a naked woman, and make thy dogges thus to seize on her, as ifshe were a savage beast; therefore beleeve me, I will defend her sofarre as I am able.
5.   DOTH YET NEVERTHELESSE RENOWNE A MAN, AND BRING HIM TO FARRE
6.  Poore Martellino was in a pittifull case, crying out for mercy,but no man would heare him; for, the more he cryed, the more stillthey did beat him, as meaning to leave no life in him: which Stechioand Marquiso seeing, considered with themselves, that they werelikewise in a desperate case; and therefore, fearing to be as muchmisused, they cryed out among the rest, Kill the counterfet knave, layon loade, and spare him not; neverthelesse, they tooke care how to gethim out of the peoples handes, as doubting, least they would killhim indeede, by their extreame violence.

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1.  But why do I trouble you with the repetition of so many countries? Icoasted on still, after I had past Saint Georges Arme, into Truffia,and then into Buffia which are Countries much inhabited, and withgreat people. From thence I went into the Land of Lying, where I foundstore of the Brethren of our Religion, and many other beside, whoshunned all paine and labour, onely for the love of God, and caredas little, for the paines and travailes which others tooke, exceptsome benefit arised thereby to them; nor spend they any money inthis Country, but such as is without stampe. Thence I went into theLand of Abruzzi, where the men and women goe in Galoches over theMountaines, and make them garments of their Swines guts. Not farrefrom thence, I found people, that carried bread in their staves, andwine in Satchels, when parting from them, I arrived among theMountaines of Bacchus, where all the waters run downe with a deepefall, and in short time, I went on so far, that I found my selfe to bein India Pastinaca; where I swear to you by the holy habit which Iweare on my body, that I saw Serpents Bye, things incredible, and suchas were never seene before.But because I would be loth to lye, so soone as I departed thence,I met with Maso de Saggio, who was a great Merchant there, and whomI found cracking Nuts, and selling Cockles by retale. Neverthelesse,al this while I could not finde what I sought for, and therefore I wasto passe from hence by water, if I intended to travaile thither, andso into the Holy Land, where coole fresh bread is sold for fourepence, and the hot is given away for nothing. There I found thevenerable Father (blame me not I beseech you) the most woorthiePatriarch of Jerusalem, who for the reverence due to the habite Iweare, and love to our Lord Baron Saint Anthony, would have me tosee al the holy Reliques, which he had there under his charge:wherof there were so many, as if I should recount them all to you, Inever could come to a conclusion. But yet not to leave youdiscomforted, I will relate some few of them to you. First of all,he shewed me the finger of the holy Ghost, so whole and perfect, asever it was. Next, the nose of the Cherubin, which appeared to SaintFrances; with the payring of the naile of a Seraphin; and one of theribbes of Verbum caro, fastened to one of the Windowes' covered withthe holy garments of the Catholique Faith. Then he tooke me into adarke Chappel, where he shewed me divers beames of the Starre thatappeared to the three Kings in the East. Also a Violl of SaintMichaels sweate, when he combatted with the divell: And the jaw-boneof dead Lazarus, with many other precious things beside. And because Iwas liberall to him, giving him two of the Plaines of Monte Morello,in the Vulgare Edition, and some of the Chapters del Caprezio, whichhe had long laboured in search of; he bestowed on me some of hisReliques. First, he gave me one of the eye-teeth of Santa Crux; anda litle Violl, filled with some part of the sound of those Belles,which hung in the sumptuous Temple of Salomon. Next, he gave mee theFeather of the Phoenix, which was with Noah in the Arke, as before Itold you. And one of the Woodden Pattens, which the good Saint Gerrardde Magnavilla used to weare in his travailes, and which I gave (notlong since) to Gerrardo di Bousy at Florence, where it is respectedwith much devotion. Moreover, he gave me a few of those Coales,wherwith the Phoenix of Noah was roasted; all which things I broughtaway thence with me. Now, most true it is, that my Superiour wouldnever suffer mee to shew them any where, untill he was faithfullycertified, whether they were the same precious Reliques, or no. Butperceyving by sundrie Myracles which they have wrought, and Letters ofsufficient credence receyved from the reverend Patriarch, that allis true, he hath graunted me permission to them, and because I woldnot trust any one with matters of such moment, I my selfe brought themhither with me. Now I must tell you, that the Feather of the samePhoenix, I conveyed into a small Cabinet or Casket, because itshould not be bent or broken. And the Coales wherewith the saidPhoenix was roasted, I put into another Casket, in all respects solike to the former, that many times I have taken one for another. Asnow at this instant it hath bin my fortune: for, imagining that Ibrought the Casket with the feather, I mistooke my self, and broughtthe other with the coales. Wherein doubtles I have not offended,because I am certaine, that we of our Order do not any thing, but itis ordred by divine direction, and our blessed Patron the LordeBaron Saint Anthony. And so much the rather, because about a senighthence, the Feast of Saint Anthony is to bee solemnized, against thepreparation whereof, and to kindle your zeale with the greaterfervencie: he put the Casket with the Coales into my hand, meaning,let you see the Feather, at some more fitting season. And therefore myblessed Sonnes and Daughters, put off your Bonnets, and come hitherwith devotion to looke upon them. But first let me tell you, whosoeveris marked by any of these Coales, with the signe of the Crosse: heor she shal live all this yeare happily, and no fire whatsoevershall come neere to touch or hurt them. So, singing a solemneAntheme in the praise of S. Anthony, he unveyled the Casket, andshewed the Coales openly.The simple multitude, having (with great admiration and reverence)a long while beheld them, they thronged in crouds to Fryar Onyon,giving him farre greater offerings, then before they had, andentreating him to marke them each after other. Whereupon, he takingthe coales in his hand, began to marke their garments of white, andthe veyles on the Womens heads, with Crosses of no meane extendure:affirming to them, that the more the Coales wasted with making thosegreat crosses, the more they still encreased in the Casket, as oftenbefore hee had made triall.
2.  THE SECOND DAY, THE SEVENTH NOVELL
3.  Not long after, they finding the Citie, and behaviour of thepeople sufficiently pleasing to them; they resolved on theircontinuance heere, entering into a league of love and friendshippewith divers, never regarding, whether they were Gentlemen, or no, ordistinguishing the poore from the rich: but only in being conformeto their complexions, sociable and fit for friendship.
4、  But,
5、  Say to my Soveraigne Lord, that I must die

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  • 林金本 08-05

      Such was the apprehension of this witty Lady, that these wordsseemed to taxe her honour, or else to contaminate the hearersunderstanding, whereof there were great plenty about her, whosejudgement might be as vile, as the speeches were scandalous.Wherefore, never seeking for any further purgation of her cleareconscience, but onely to retort taunt for taunt, presently thus shereplied. My Lord, if I should make such a vile adventure, I wouldlooke to bee payde with better money.

  • 任仲伦 08-05

      Alessandro hearing his arrivall, and also the removall of the bords,although he was exceedingly affraid; yet he lay quietly stil, andstirred not, and Rinuccio beeing in the grave, tooke Alessandro by thefeete, haling him forth, and (mounting him uppon his backe) went onthus loden, towards the house of Madam Francesca. As he passed alongthe streets, unseene or unmet by any, Alessandro suffered manyshrewd rushings and punches, by turnings at the streets corners, andjolting against bulkes, poasts, and stalles, which Rinuccio couldnot avoyd, in regard the night was so wonderfully darke, as heecould not see which way he went.

  • 欧建明 08-05

       Nor was dismaide.

  • 魏姝琴 08-05

      "In like manner, if Gisippus hath married Sophronia well, it isfoolish and superfluous, to finde fault with the manner hee used inher marriage. If you mislike his course in the case, beware of himhereafter, yet thanke him because it is no worse. "Neverthelesse,you are to understand, that I sought not by fraud or deceit, (butonely by witte) any opportunitie, whereby any way to sullie thehonestie and cleere Nobilitie of your bloud, in the person ofSophronia: for although in secret I made her my wife, yet I came notas an enemie, to take her perforce, nor (like a ravisher) wrongedher virginitie, to blemish your no. titles, or despising youralliance. But fervently, enflamed by her bright beauty, and incitedalso by her unparalleld vertues, I shaped my course; knowing wellenough, that if I tooke the ordinarie way of wiving, by moving thequestion to you, I should never winne your consent, as fearing, lest Iwould take her with me to Rome, and so conveigh out of your sight, ajewell by you so much esteemed, as she is.

  • 诺克斯维尔 08-04

    {  So lifting up the Cudgell, he gave him therewith halfe a scoregood bastinadoes, laying them on soundly, both on his armes andshoulders: and Egano feeling the smart of them, durst not speake oneWorde, but fled away from him so fast as hee could, Anichino stillfollowing, and multiplying many other injurious speeches againsthim, with the Epithites of Strumpet, lustfull and insatiate Woman.Go thou lewde beast (quoth he) most unworthy the title of a Lady, orto be Wife unto so good a natured man, as my Mayster is, to whom Iwill reveale thy most ungracious incivility to Morrow, that he maypunish thee a little better then I have done.

  • 梁波罗 08-03

      Beguiling others by his treacherous showes.}

  • 伦兵匡 08-03

      WHERIN MAY EVIDENTLY BE DISCERNED, THAT SERVANTS TO PRINCES AND

  • 克里斯-派恩 08-03

      Within some short while after, the Abbot knowing the Monke to bein the Convent, and supposing him to be lately returned with the wood,determined to reprove him sharpely, and to have him closelyimprisoned, that the Damosell might remaine solie to himselfe. Andcausing him to be called presently before him, with a very stearne andangry countenance, giving him many harsh and bitter speeches,commanded, that he should be clapt in prison.

  • 唐闻生 08-02

       Which do most displease.

  • 张鹏周 07-31

    {  While his fancies were thus amorously set on fire, the time came,that they must make head against the Prince, who already wasmarching with in the Dukes dominions: wherfore the Duke,Constantine, and all the rest, according to a counsel held among them,went to defend certaine of the Frontiers, to the end that the Princemight passe no further. Remaining there divers dayes together,Constantine (who could thinke on nothing else but the beautifulLady) considered with himself, that while the Duke was now so farrefrom her, it was an easie matter to compasse his intent: Hereupon, thebetter to colour his present returne to Athens, he seemed to besurprized with a sudden extreame sicknesse, in regard whereof (bythe Dukes free license, and leaving all his power to his CosenEmanuel) forthwith he journyed backe to Athens. After someconference had with his sister, about her dishonourable wrongs enduredat his hands onely, by the Lady, he solemnly protested, that if shewere so pleased, hee would aide her powerfully in the matter, bytaking her from the place where shee was, and never more afterward, tobe seene in that Country any more.

  • 马大嫂 07-31

      THE SONG

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