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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:格瑞诺布 大小:BmdCfCvL46702KB 下载:056SvLPE84556次
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日期:2020-08-04 07:58:02
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刘一兵

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Madam, I have often heard it said, that one Cocke may doe service toten several Hennes, but ten men can very hardly even with all theirbest endeavour, give full satisfaction every way to one woman; and yetI am tied to content nine, which is farre beyond the compasse of mypower to do. Already have I performed so much Garden and Chamber-work,that I confesse my selfe starke tired, and can travaile no further,and therefore let me entreate you to lycense my departure hence, orfinde some meanes for my better ease. The Abbesse bearing himspeake, who had so long ben there stricken into admiration, andaccounting it almost a miracle, said. How commeth this to passe? Iverily beleeved thee to be dumbe. Madam (quoth Massetto) so I wasindeed, but not by Nature; onely I had a long lingering sickneswhich bereft me of speech, and which I have not onely recovered againethis night, but shal ever remaine thankfull to you for it.
2.  The good old Lady imagined, that this was a matter somewhatdifficult, and might lay a blamefull imputation on her daughter.Neverthelesse, considering, what an honest office it was in her, tobee the meanes, whereby so worthy a Countesse should recover anunkinde husband, led altogether by lust, and not a jot of cordialllove; she knew the intent to be honest, the Countesse vertuous, andher promise religious, and therefore undertooke to effect it. Withinfew dayes after, verie ingeniously, and according to the instructedorder, the Ring was obtayned, albeit much against the Counts will; andthe Countesse, in sted of the Ladies vertuous daughter, was embracedby him in bed: the houre proving so auspicious, and juno being Lady ofthe ascendent, conjoyned with the witty Mercury, shee conceived of twogoodly Sonnes, and her deliverance agreed correspondently with thejust time.Thus the old Lady, not at this time onely, but at many other meetingsbesides; gave the Countesse free possession of her husbands pleasures,yet alwayes in such darke and concealed secrecie, as it was neversuspected, nor knowne by any but themselves, the Count lying withhis owne wife, and disappointed of her whom he more deerely loved.Alwayes at his uprising in the mornings (which usually was beforethe break of day, for preventing the least scruple of suspicion)many familiar conferences passed betweene them, with the gifts ofdivers faire: and costly jewels; all which the Countesse carefullykept, and perceiving assuredly, that shee was conceived with childe,shee would no longer bee troublesome to the good old Lady; but callingher aside, spake thus to her. Madame, I must needes give thankes toheaven and you, because my desires are amply accomplished, and bothtime and your deserts doe justly challenge, that I shouldaccordingly quite you before my departure. It remaineth now in yourowne power, to make what demand you please of me, which yet I will notgive you by way of reward, because that would seeme to bee base andmercenary: but onely whatsoever you shall receive of me, is inhonourable recompence of faire and vertuous deservings, such as anyhonest and well-minded Lady in the like distresse, may with goodcredit allow, and yet no prejudice to her reputation.
3.  Jeronimo, you are now growne to an indifferent stature, and (almost)able to take government of your selfe. It cannot then seeme any wayinconvenient, to acquaint you with your deceased Fathers affaires, andby what good courses he came to such wealth. You are his onely sonneand heire, to whom he hath bequeathed his rich possessions (yourMothers moity evermore remembred) and travaile would now seeme fittingfor you, as well to gaine experience in Trafficke and Merchandize,as also to let you see the worlds occurrences. Your Mother therefore(and we have thought it expedient) that you should journey fromhence to Paris, there to continue for some such fitting time, as maygrant you full and free opportunity, to survey what stocke of wealthis there employed for you, and to make you understand, how yourFactors are furtherous to your affaires. Beside, this is the way tomake you a man of more solid apprehension, and perfect instructionin civill courses of life; rather then by continuing here to seenone but Lords, Barons, and Gentlemen, whereof we have too great anumber. When you are sufficiently qualified there, and have learnedwhat belongeth to a worthy Marchant, such as was Leonardo Sighieroyour famous Father; you may returne home againe at your owne pleasure.
4.  At the first, Signior Gilberto waxed exceeding angry, but when hefurther considered withall, the pure and honest intention of his Wife;wisely he pacified his former distemper, and saide. Dianora, it is notthe part of a wise and honest woman, to lend an eare to ambassagesof such immodest nature, much lesse to compound or make agreementfor her honesty, with any person, under any condition whatsoever.Those perswasions which the heart listeneth to, by allurement of theeare, have greater power then many do imagine, and nothing is souneasie or difficult, but in a lovers judgement it appeareth possible.Ill didst thou therefore first of all to listen, but worse (afterward)to contract.
5.  The holy Religious man, so soone as he heard her description ofthe man, presently knew whom shee meant, and highly commending theGentlewoman for her good and vertuous seeming disposition, beleevedfaithfully all that shee had said: promising her, to order thematter so well and discreetly, as shee should not any more beeoffended. And knowing her to be a woman of great wealth (after alltheir usuall manner, when they cast forth their fishing nets forgaine:) liberally he commeuned Almesdeeds, and dayly workes ofCharity, recounting to her beside his owne particular necessities.Then, giving him two peeces of Gold, she said: I pray you (goodFather) to be mindfull of me, and if he chance to make any deniall,tell him, that I spake it my selfe to you, and by the way of a sadcomplaint her confession being ended, and penance easie enoughenjoyned her, she promised to make her parents bountifullBenefactors to the Convent, and put more money into his hand, desiringhim in his Masses, to remember the soules of her deceased friends, andso returned home to her house.
6.  The young Gentleman having heard these protestations made by hisMother, was not a little ashamed of his owne follie; butrecollecting his better thoughts together, and knowing in his soule,that no one could better further his hopes, then shee; forgettingall his former feare, he returned her this answere; Madam, and mydearely affected Mother, nothing hath more occasioned my loves sostrict concealement, but an especiall errour, which I finde by dailyproofe in many, who being growne to yeeres of grave discretion, doenever remember, that they themselves have bin yong. But because hereinI find you to be both discreet and wise, I will not onely affirme whatyou have seen in me to be true, but also will confesse, to whom it is:upon condition, that the effect of your promise may follow it,according to the power remaining in you, whereby you onely maysecure my life.

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1.  Melisso marvelling at her froward answere, rebuked her for it invery kind manner: whereupon, Giosefo spake thus to her. I perceivewife, you are the same woman as you were wount to be: but beleeve meon my word, I shal quite alter you from this curst complexion. Soturning to Melisso, thus he proceeded. Noble friend, we shall tryanone, whether the counsell of King Salomon bee effectuall, or no; andI pray you, let it not be offensive to you to see it; but ratherhold all to be done in merriment. And because I would not behindered by you, doe but remember the answere which the Mulettergave us, when we tooke compassion on his Mule. Worthy friend,replyed Melisso, I am in your owne house, where I purpose not toimpeach whatsoever you doe.
2.  THE SIXT DAY, THE NINTH NOVELL
3.  I make not any doubt, but almes-deedes and prayers, are very mighty;and prevailing meanes, to appease heavens anger for some sinnescommitted; but if such as bestow them, did either see or know, to whomthey give them: they would more warily keepe them, or else cast thembefore Swine, in regard they are altogether so unworthy of them. Butcome we now to the case of your ghostly father, crying out in youreare, that secret mariage was a most greevous sinne: Is not the breachthereof farre greater? Familiar conversation betweene man and manand woman, is a concession meerely naturall: but to rob, kill, orbanish any one, proceedeth from the mindes malignity. That thou didrob Theobaldo, your selfe hath already sufficiently witnessed, bytaking that from him, which with free consent in mariage you gave him.Next I must say, that by all the power remaining in you, you kild him,because you would not permit him to remaine with you, declaring yourselfe in the very height of cruelty, that hee might destroy his lifeby his owne hands. In which case the Law requireth, that whosoeveris the occasion of an ill act committed, hee or she is as deepe in thefault, as the party that did it. Now concerning his banishment, andwandring seaven yeeres in exile thorow the world; you cannot denie,but that you were the onely occasion thereof. In all which threeseverall actions, farre more capitally have you offended; then bycontracting of mariage in such clandestine manner.
4.  Thus parted Signior Thorello and his friends, from Saladine andhis company, who verily determined in the heighth of his minde, ifhe should be spared with life, and the warre (which he expected)concluded: to requite Thorello with no lesse courtesie, then hee hadalready declared to him; conferring a long while after with hisBaschaes, both of him and his beauteous Lady, not forgetting any oftheir courteous actions, but gracing them all with deservedcommendation. But after they had (with very laborious paines) surveyedmost of the Westerne parts, they all tooke Shipping, and returned intoAlexandria: sufficiently informed, what preparation was to be made fortheir owne defence. And Signior Thorello being come backe againe toPavia, consulted with his privat thoughts (many times after) whatthese three travailers should be, but came farre short of knowingthe truth, till (by experience) hee became better informed.
5.  REPREHENDING THE CUNNING OF IMMODEST WOMEN, WHO BY ABUSING
6.  When the King heard this, stedfastly he looked on the Count; and,notwithstanding his wonderfull alteration, both from his wontedfeature and forme: yet, after he had very seriously viewed him, heknew him perfectly; and the teares trickling downe his cheekespartly with remorsefull shame, and joy also for his so happy recovery,he tooke up the Count from kneeling, kissing, and embracing him verykindely, welcomming Perotto in the selfe same manner. Immediately alsohe gave commaund, that the Count should be restored to his honors,apparell, servants, horses, and furniture, answerable to his highestate and calling, which was as speedily performed. Moreover, the Kingreatly honoured Sir Roger Mandevile, desiring to be made acquaintedwith all their passed fortunes.

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1.  Our amorous Panuccio being none of the wisest young men in theworld, perceiving his errour; sought not to amend it, (as well hemight have done) with some queint straine of wit, carried in quick andcleanly manner, but angerly answered. What shall I find that thoudarst doe to me? am I any way afraid of thy threatnings? The Hostesimagining she was in bed with her Husband, said to Adriano: HarkeHusband, I thinke our Guests are quarrelling together, I hope theywill doe no harme to one another. Adriano laughing outright, answered.Let them alone, and become friends againe as they fell out: perhapsthey dranke too much yesternight.
2.  You are to know then, that sometime there lived in our Citie, a verywelthy Merchant, named Arriguccio Berlinghieri, who (as many Merchantshave done) fondly imagined, to make himselfe a Gentleman bymarriage. Which that he might the more assuredly do, he took to wife aGentlewoman, one much above his degree or element, she being namedSimonida. Now, in regard that he delighted (as it is the usuall lifeof a Merchant) to be often abroad, and little at home, whereby sheehad small benefit of his company; shee grew very forward inaffection with a young Gentleman, called Signior Roberto, who hadsolicited hir by many amorous meanes, and (at length) prevailed to winher favor. Which favour being once obtained; affection gaddes so farrebeyond al discretion, and makes Lovers so heedelesse of theirprivate conversations: that either they are taken tardy in theirfolly, or else subjected to scandalous suspition.
3.  Now the Feast of Christmasse drawing neere, the Gentlewoman saidto her Husband; that, if it stood with his liking: she would do suchduty as fitted with so solemne a time, by going earely in a morningunto Church, there to be confessed, and receive her Saviour, asother Christians did. How now? replied the jealous Asse, what sinneshave you committed, that should neede confession? How Husband? quothshe, what do you thinke me to be a Saint? Who knoweth not, I pray you,that I am as subject to sinne, as any other Woman living in the world?But my sins are not to be revealed to you, because you are noPriest. These words enflamed his jealousie more violently then before,and needes must he know what sinnes she had committed, and havingresolved what to do in this case, made her answer: That hee wascontented with her motion, alwaies provided, that she went to no otherChurch, then unto their owne Chappel, betimes in a morning; andtheir own Chaplaine to confesse her, or some other Priest by himappointed, but not any other: and then she to returne home presentlyagaine. She being a woman of acute apprehension, presently collectedhis whole intention: but seeming to take no knowledge thereof,replyed, that she would not swerve from his direction.
4.  Having thus a long while consulted with her selfe, and (perhaps)oftner then twice or thrice; she became secretly acquainted with anaged woman, generally reputed to be more then halfe a Saint, walkingalwayes very demurely in the streetes, counting (over and over) herPaters Nosters, and all the Cities holy pardons hanging at hergirdle never talking of any thing, but the lives of the holyFathers, or the woundes of Saint Frances, all the World admiring hersanctity of life, even as if shee were divinely inspired: this sheeSaint must bee our distressed womans Counsellour, and having found outa convenient season, at large she imparted all her minde to her, insome such manner as formerly you have heard, whereto she returned thisanswer.
5.   Buffalmaco, Bruno, and the whole company, perceiving how hecontinued still his coughing and spetting, saide all with one voyce,That Calandrino was the Theefe to him selfe: and gave him manie grossespeeches beside, all departing home unto their houses, very muchdispleased and angry with him. After they were gone, none remainedwith him but the Priest, Bruno and Buffalmaco, who thus spake toCalandrino. I did ever thinke, that thou wast the theefe thy selfe,yet thou imputedst thy robbery to some other, for feare we should oncedrinke freely of thy purse, as thou hast done many times of ours.Calandrino, who had not yet ended his coughing and spetting, swaremany bitter Oathes, that his Brawne was stolne from him. Talke so longas thou wilt, quoth Buffalmaco, thy knavery is both knowne andseene, and well thou mayst be ashamed of thy selfe. Calandrino hearingthis, grew desperately angry; and to incense him more, Bruno thuspursued the matter.
6.  WHICH PLAINLY DECLARETH, THAT A COVETOUS GENTLEMAN, IS NOT

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1.  According as I have heard it reported, neere to Saint Brancazio,there dwelt an honest man, and some-what rich, who was called Pucciodi Rinieri, and who addicted all his paines and endeavours to Alchimy:wherefore, he kept no other family, but onely a widdowed daughter, anda servant; and because he had no other Art or exercise, he usedoften to frequent the market place. And in regard he was but a weakewitted man and a gourmand or grosse feeder; his language was themore harsh and rude; like to our common Porters or sottish men, andhis carriage also absurd, boore-like, and clownish. His daughter,being named Monna Isabetta, aged not above eight and twenty, or thirtyyeeres; was a fresh indifferent faire, plumpe, round woman, cherrycheekt, like a Queene-Apple; and, to please her Father, fed not sosparingly, as otherwise she would have done, but when she communedor jested with any body, she would talke of nothing, but onelyconcerning the great vertue in Alchimy, extolling it above all otherArts.
2.  At last he came to the lodging of the man indeede, that had soimpudently usurped his place, who could not as yet sleepe, for joyof atchieved adventure. When he espied the King come in, knowingwell the occasion of his search, he began to waxe very doubtfull, sothat his heart and pulse beating extreamely, he felt a furtheraddition of feare, as being confidently perswaded, that there wasnow no other way but death, especially if the King discovered hisagony. And although many considerations were in his braine, yetbecause he saw that the King was unarmed, his best refuge was, to makeshew of sleepe, in expectation what the King intended to doe. Amongthem all he had sought, yet could not find any likelihood, wherebyto gather a grounded probability; he came to this Querry, whoseheart and pulses laboured so strongly, that he said to himselfe, Yeamary, this is th man that did the deede.
3.  On the day following, which was towards the ending of the monethof May, Catharina began to complaine to her Mother that the season wasover-hot and tedious, to be still lodged in her Mothers Chamber,because it was an hinderance to her sleeping; and wanting rest, itwould be an empairing of her health. Why Daughter (quoth the Mother)the weather (as yet) is not so hot, but (in my minde) you may verywell endure it. Alas Mother, saide she, aged people, as you and myFather are, do not feele the heates of youthfull blood, by reason ofyour farre colder complexion, which is not to be measured by youngeryeeres. I know that well Daughter, replyed the Mother; but is it in mypower, to make the weather warme or coole, as thou perhaps wouldsthave it? Seasons are to be suffered, according to their severallqualities; and though the last night might seeme hot, this nextensuing may be cooler, and then thy rest will be the better. NoMother, quoth Catharina, that cannot be; for as Summer proceedethon, so the heate encreaseth, and no expectation can be of temperateweather, untill it groweth to Winter againe. Why Daughter, saide theMother, what wouldest thou have me to do? Mother (quoth she) if itmight stand with my Fathers good liking and yours, I would be sparedfrom the Garden Gallery, which is a great deale more coole lodged.There shall I heare the sweete Nightingale sing, as every night sheuseth to do, and many other pretty Birdes beside, which I cannot dolodging in your Chamber.
4、  The Gossip inwardly smiling at her idle speeches, which(nevertheles) she avouched with very vehement asseverations: fellinstantly sicke of womens naturall disease, thinking every minute atedious month, till she were in company with some other Gossips, tobreake the obligation of her vertuous promise, and that others (aswell as her selfe) might laugh at the folly of this shallow-wittedwoman. The next day following, it was her hap to be at a wedding,among a great number of other women, whom quickly she acquaintedwith this so strange a wonder; as they did the like to their husbands:and passing so from hand to hand, in lesse space then two dayes, allVenice was fully possessed with it. Among the rest, the brethren tothis foolish woman, heard this admirable newes concerning theirSister; and they discreetly concealing it to themselves, closelyconcluded to watch the walks of this pretended God: and if he soarednot too lofty a flight, they would clip his wings, to come thebetter acquainted with him. It fortuned, that the Friar hearing hisCupidicall visitations over-publikely discovered, purposed to checkand reprove Lisetta for her indiscretion. And being habitedaccording to his former manner, his Friarly Cowle covering all hisformer bravery, he left his companion where he used to stay, andclosely walked along unto the house. No sooner was he entred, butthe Brethren being ambushed neere to the doore, went in after him, andascending the staires, by such time as he had uncased himselfe, andappeared like God Cupid, with his spangled wings displayed: theyrushed into the Chamber, and he having no other refuge, opened a largeCasement, standing directly over the great gulfe or River, andpresently leapt into the water; which being deepe, and he skilfullin swimming, he had no other harme by his fall, albeit the sodaineaffright did much perplex him.
5、  Pamphilus having ended his Novell, whereat the Ladies laughedexceedingly, so that very hardly they could give over. The Queene gavecharge to Madame Eliza, that shee should next succeed in order;when, being scarcely able to refraine from smyling, thus she began.

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  • 代克俭 08-03

      The Song being ended, the Chorus whereof was answered by them all,it passed with generall applause: and after a few other daunces, thenight being well run on, the Queene gave ending to this first dayesRecreation. So, lights being brought, they departed to theirseverall Lodgings, to take their rest till the next morning.

  • 阿尔兰巴奈特 08-03

      We have long since heard, that with witty words, ready answeresand sudden jests or taunts, many have checkt and reproved greatfolly in others, and to their no meane owne commendation. Now, becauseit is a pleasing kinde of argument, ministring occasion of mirth andwit: my desire is, that all our discourse to morrow shall tendthereto. I meane of such persons, either Men or Women, who with somesudden witty answere, have encountred a scorner in his owne intention,and layed the blame where it justly belonged. Every one commendedthe Queenes appointment, because it savoured of good wit andjudgement; and the Queene being risen, they were all discharged tillsupper time, falling to such severall exercises as themselves bestfancyed.

  • 郑沂 08-03

       All this being done, variety of pleasing Wines were brought,Banquetting stuffe, and other dainties; after which they fell toDauncing. And Pamphilus, having receyved command to begin anespecial dance, the King turned himselfe unto Madame Eliza, speakingthus. Faire Lady, you have done me so much honour this day, as todeliver mee the Crowne: in regard whereof, be you this night theMistresse of the song: and let it be such as best may please yourselfe. Whereunto Madam Eliza, with a modest blush arising in her face,replyed; That his will should be fulfilled, and then (with adeficate voyce) she beganne in this manner.

  • 孙丹印 08-03

      As I have heard reported by many, there sometime lived in Perouse orPerugia, a young man, named Andrea de Piero, whose profession was totrade about Horses, in the nature of a Horse-courser, orHorsemaster, who hearing of a good Faire or Market (for his purpose)at Naples, did put five hundred Crownes of gold in his purse, andjourneyed thither in the company of other Horse-coursers, arrivingthere on a Sunday in the evening. According to instructions givenhim by his Host, he went the next day into the Horse-market, wherehe saw very many Horses that he liked, cheapening their prices as hewent up and downe, but could fall to no agreement; yet to manifestthat he came purposely to buy, and not as a cheapener onely,oftentimes (like a shallow-brainde trader in the world) he shewedhis purse of gold before all passengers, never respecting who, or whatthey were that observed his follie.

  • 西安-潼关 08-02

    {  Pyrrhus, who had often considered on Lescaes first message,concluded with himselfe; that if any more she moved the same matter:hee would returne her another kinde of answere, wholly yeelding tocontent his Lady; provided, that he might remaine assured,concerning the intyre truth of the motion, and that it was not urgedonely to trie him, wherefore, thus he replyed. Lesca, do not imaginemee so ignorant, as not to know the certaintie of all thy formerallegations, confessing them as freely as thou doest, or canst. Butyet let mee tell thee withall, that I knowe my Lord to be wise andjudicious, and having committed all his affaires to my care and trust:never blame mee to misdoubt, least my Ladie (by his counsell andadvice) make thee the messenger of this motion, therby to call myFidelitie in question.

  • 莎莎·嘉宝 08-01

      WHEREON, UNDER THE GOVERNMENT OF MADAME AIMILIA, THE ARGUMENT OF}

  • 戎祥南 08-01

      But after he had dwelt long enough upon these thoughts, he turnedhim selfe to Signior Neri, and demanded of him, what Damosels theywere. Sir (answered Neri) they are my Daughters, both brought into theworld at one birth, and Twinnes, the one being named Genevera thefaire, and the other Isotta the amiable. The King began againe tocommend them both, and gave him advise to get them both married:wherein he excused himselfe, alleadging, that he wanted power to doeit. At the same time instant, no other service remaining to be broughtto the table, except Fruit and Cheese, the two Damosels returnedagaine, attyred in goodly Roabes of Carnation Sattin, formed after theTurkish fashion, carrying two fayre Silver dishes in their hands,filled with divers delicate Fruites, such as the season then afforded,setting them on the Table before the King. Which being done, theyretyred a little backeward, and with sweet melodious voyces, sung aditty, beginning in this manner.

  • 文一云 08-01

      The Monke, though his delight with the Damosell was extraordinary,yet feare and suspition followed upon it; for, in the very height ofall his wantonnesse, he heard a soft treading about the doore. Andprying thorow a small crevice in the same dore, perceived apparantly,that the Abbot himselfe stood listening there, and could not beignorant but that the Maide was with him in the Chamber. As afterpleasure ensueth paine, for the veniall Monke knew well enough (thoughwanton heate would not let him heede it before) that most greevouspunishment must bee inflicted on him, which made him sad beyond allmeasure: Neverthelesse, without disclosing his dismay to the yongMaiden, he began to consider with himselfe on many meanes, wherebyto find out one that might best fit his turne. And suddenlyconceited an apt stratagem, which sorted to such effect as he wouldhave it: whereupon, seeming satisfied for that season, he tolde theDamosell, that (being carefull of her credit) as hee had brought herin unseene of any, so he would free her from thence againe, desiringher to tarrie there (without making any noyse at all) untill such timeas he returned to her.

  • 郝世玲 07-31

       This vertuous Lady, being wearied with his often temptations, andseeing, that by denying whatsoever he demanded, yet he wold not giveover his suite, but so much the more importunatly stil pursued her:began to bethinke her selfe, how she might best be rid of him, byimposing some such taske upon him, as should bee impossible (in heropinion) for him to effect. An olde woman, whom hee imployed for hiscontinual messenger to her, as shee came one day about her ordinaryerrand, with her she communed in this manner. Good woman (quoth she)thou hast so often assured me, that Signior Ansaldo loveth me aboveall other Women in the world, offering me wonderfull gifts andpresents in his name, which I have alwayes refused, and so stil wildo, in regard I am not to be woon by any such allurements: yet if Icould be soundly perswaded, that his affection is answerable to thyperemptory protestations, I shoulde (perhaps) be the sooner wonne,to listen to his suite in milder manner, then hitherto I have done.Wherefore, if he wil give me assurance, to perform such a businesse asI mean to enjoyne him, he shall the speedier heare better answerfrom me, and I wil confirme it with mine oath.

  • 李建民 07-29

    {  To decke up their Bowers,

  • 潘东塔 07-29

      THAT TRUELY KNOW HOW TO USE THEM

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