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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:鹿礁 大小:WKOYRMsQ85943KB 下载:6LPbChOm35823次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:KgUehLYs23884条
日期:2020-08-10 21:46:08
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "I will tell you everything," answered Ulysses, "quite truly. I comefrom Alybas, where I have a fine house. I am son of king Apheidas, whois the son of Polypemon. My own name is Eperitus; heaven drove meoff my course as I was leaving Sicania, and I have been carried hereagainst my will. As for my ship it is lying over yonder, off theopen country outside the town, and this is the fifth year sinceUlysses left my country. Poor fellow, yet the omens were good forhim when he left me. The birds all flew on our right hands, and bothhe and I rejoiced to see them as we parted, for we had every hope thatwe should have another friendly meeting and exchange presents."
2.  "Your guest has not disgraced you, Telemachus. I did not miss what Iaimed at, and I was not long in stringing my bow. I am still strong,and not as the suitors twit me with being. Now, however, it is timefor the Achaeans to prepare supper while there is still daylight,and then otherwise to disport themselves with song and dance which arethe crowning ornaments of a banquet."
3.  "I will tell you all about them," replied Eumaeus, "Laertes is stillliving and prays heaven to let him depart peacefully his own house,for he is terribly distressed about the absence of his son, and alsoabout the death of his wife, which grieved him greatly and aged himmore than anything else did. She came to an unhappy end through sorrowfor her son: may no friend or neighbour who has dealt kindly by mecome to such an end as she did. As long as she was still living,though she was always grieving, I used to like seeing her and askingher how she did, for she brought me up along with her daughterCtimene, the youngest of her children; we were boy and girltogether, and she made little difference between us. When, however, weboth grew up, they sent Ctimene to Same and received a splendiddowry for her. As for me, my mistress gave me a good shirt and cloakwith a pair of sandals for my feet, and sent me off into thecountry, but she was just as fond of me as ever. This is all over now.Still it has pleased heaven to prosper my work in the situationwhich I now hold. I have enough to eat and drink, and can findsomething for any respectable stranger who comes here; but there is nogetting a kind word or deed out of my mistress, for the house hasfallen into the hands of wicked people. Servants want sometimes to seetheir mistress and have a talk with her; they like to have somethingto eat and drink at the house, and something too to take back withthem into the country. This is what will keep servants in a goodhumour."
4.  Then she said to her head waiting woman Eurynome, "Bring a seat witha fleece upon it, for the stranger to sit upon while he tells hisstory, and listens to what I have to say. I wish to ask him somequestions."
5.  As she spoke Telemachus sneezed so loudly that the whole houseresounded with it. Penelope laughed when she heard this, and said toEumaeus, "Go and call the stranger; did you not hear how my sonsneezed just as I was speaking? This can only mean that all thesuitors are going to be killed, and that not one of them shall escape.Furthermore I say, and lay my saying to your heart: if I amsatisfied that the stranger is speaking the truth I shall give him ashirt and cloak of good wear."
6.  Thereon he loosed the bonds that bound them, and as soon as theywere free they scampered off, Mars to Thrace and laughter-loving Venusto Cyprus and to Paphos, where is her grove and her altar fragrantwith burnt offerings. Here the Graces hathed her, and anointed herwith oil of ambrosia such as the immortal gods make use of, and theyclothed her in raiment of the most enchanting beauty.

计划指导

1.  ULYSSES now left the haven, and took the rough track up throughthe wooded country and over the crest of the mountain till hereached the place where Minerva had said that he would find theswineherd, who was the most thrifty servant he had. He found himsitting in front of his hut, which was by the yards that he hadbuilt on a site which could be seen from far. He had made themspacious and fair to see, with a free ran for the pigs all round them;he had built them during his master's absence, of stones which hehad gathered out of the ground, without saying anything to Penelope orLaertes, and he had fenced them on top with thorn bushes. Outsidethe yard he had run a strong fence of oaken posts, split, and setpretty close together, while inside lie had built twelve sties nearone another for the sows to lie in. There were fifty pigs wallowing ineach sty, all of them breeding sows; but the boars slept outside andwere much fewer in number, for the suitors kept on eating them, anddie swineherd had to send them the best he had continually. There werethree hundred and sixty boar pigs, and the herdsman's four hounds,which were as fierce as wolves, slept always with them. Theswineherd was at that moment cutting out a pair of sandals from a goodstout ox hide. Three of his men were out herding the pigs in one placeor another, and he had sent the fourth to town with a boar that he hadbeen forced to send the suitors that they might sacrifice it andhave their fill of meat.
2.  Meanwhile Ulysses and the swineherd were eating their supper inthe hut, and the men supped with them. As soon as they had had toeat and drink, Ulysses began trying to prove the swineherd and seewhether he would continue to treat him kindly, and ask him to stayon at the station or pack him off to the city; so he said:
3.  They were astounded when they heard this, for they had made surethat Telemachus had not gone to the city of Neleus. They thought hewas only away somewhere on the farms, and was with the sheep, orwith the swineherd; so Antinous said, "When did he go? Tell metruly, and what young men did he take with him? Were they freemen orhis own bondsmen- for he might manage that too? Tell me also, didyou let him have the ship of your own free will because he askedyou, or did he take it without yourleave?"
4.  "Neptune, however, lay with his daughter, and she had a son byhim, the great Nausithous, who reigned over the Phaecians.Nausithous had two sons Rhexenor and Alcinous; Apollo killed the firstof them while he was still a bridegroom and without male issue; but heleft a daughter Arete, whom Alcinous married, and honours as noother woman is honoured of all those that keep house along withtheir husbands.
5.  Menelaus then greeted them saying, "Fall to, and welcome; when youhave done supper I shall ask who you are, for the lineage of suchmen as you cannot have been lost. You must be descended from a line ofsceptre-bearing kings, for poor people do not have such sons as youare."
6.  Meanwhile lovely Polycaste, Nestor's youngest daughter, washedTelemachus. When she had washed him and anointed him with oil, shebrought him a fair mantle and shirt, and he looked like a god as hecame from the bath and took his seat by the side of Nestor. When theouter meats were done they drew them off the spits and sat down todinner where they were waited upon by some worthy henchmen, who keptpouring them out their wine in cups of gold. As soon as they had hadhad enough to eat and drink Nestor said, "Sons, put Telemachus'shorses to the chariot that he may start at once."

推荐功能

1.  Thus did they converse. Eurymachus then came up and said, "QueenPenelope, daughter of Icarius, if all the Achaeans in Iasian Argoscould see you at this moment, you would have still more suitors inyour house by tomorrow morning, for you are the most admirable womanin the whole world both as regards personal beauty and strength ofunderstanding."
2.  BOOK XI.
3.  Nurse Euryclea saw him long before any one else did. She was puttingthe fleeces on to the seats, and she burst out crying as she ran up tohim; all the other maids came up too, and covered his head andshoulders with their kisses. Penelope came out of her room lookinglike Diana or Venus, and wept as she flung her arms about her son. Shekissed his forehead and both his beautiful eyes, "Light of my eyes,"she cried as she spoke fondly to him, "so you are come home again; Imade sure I was never going to see you any more. To think of yourhaving gone off to Pylos without saying anything about it or obtainingmy consent. But come, tell me what you saw."
4.  Ulysses smiled at him and answered, "Fear not; Telemachus hassaved your life, that you may know in future, and tell other people,how greatly better good deeds prosper than evil ones. Go, therefore,outside the cloisters into the outer court, and be out of the way ofthe slaughter- you and the bard- while I finish my work here inside."
5.   "Hush," answered Ulysses, "hold your peace and ask no questions, forthis is the manner of the gods. Get you to your bed, and leave me hereto talk with your mother and the maids. Your mother in her griefwill ask me all sorts of questions."
6.  Thus did they converse. Then Arete told her maids to set a bed inthe room that was in the gatehouse, and make it with good red rugs,and to spread coverlets on the top of them with woollen cloaks forUlysses to wear. The maids thereon went out with torches in theirhands, and when they had made the bed they came up to Ulysses andsaid, "Rise, sir stranger, and come with us for your bed is ready,"and glad indeed was he to go to his rest.

应用

1.  As she spoke, she told Eumaeus to set the bow and the pieces of ironbefore the suitors, and Eumaeus wept as he took them to do as shehad bidden him. Hard by, the stockman wept also when he saw hismaster's bow, but Antinous scolded them. "You country louts," said he,"silly simpletons; why should you add to the sorrows of yourmistress by crying in this way? She has enough to grieve her in theloss of her husband; sit still, therefore, and eat your dinners insilence, or go outside if you want to cry, and leave the bow behindyou. We suitors shall have to contend for it with might and main,for we shall find it no light matter to string such a bow as thisis. There is not a man of us all who is such another as Ulysses; for Ihave seen him and remember him, though I was then only a child."
2.  "You are always taking something of that sort into your head,"replied Minerva, "and that is why I cannot desert you in yourafflictions; you are so plausible, shrewd and shifty. Any one butyourself on returning from so long a voyage would at once have gonehome to see his wife and children, but you do not seem to care aboutasking after them or hearing any news about them till you haveexploited your wife, who remains at home vainly grieving for you,and having no peace night or day for the tears she sheds on yourbehalf. As for my not coming near you, I was never uneasy about you,for I was certain you would get back safely though you would loseall your men, and I did not wish to quarrel with my uncle Neptune, whonever forgave you for having blinded his son. I will now, however,point out to you the lie of the land, and you will then perhapsbelieve me. This is the haven of the old merman Phorcys, and here isthe olive tree that grows at the head of it; [near it is the cavesacred to the Naiads;] here too is the overarching cavern in which youhave offered many an acceptable hecatomb to the nymphs, and this isthe wooded mountain Neritum."
3.  As he said this Euryclea left the cloister to fetch some more water,for the first had been all spilt; and when she had washed him andanointed him with oil, Ulysses drew his seat nearer to the fire towarm himself, and hid the scar under his rags. Then Penelope begantalking to him and said:
4、  "Telemachus, you should not remain so far away from home any longer,nor leave your property with such dangerous people in your house; theywill eat up everything you have among them, and you will have beenon a fool's errand. Ask Menelaus to send you home at once if youwish to find your excellent mother still there when you get back.Her father and brothers are already urging her to marry Eurymachus,who has given her more than any of the others, and has been greatlyincreasing his wedding presents. I hope nothing valuable may have beentaken from the house in spite of you, but you know what women are-they always want to do the best they can for the man who marries them,and never give another thought to the children of their first husband,nor to their father either when he is dead and done with. Go home,therefore, and put everything in charge of the most respectablewoman servant that you have, until it shall please heaven to sendyou a wife of your own. Let me tell you also of another matter whichyou had better attend to. The chief men among the suitors are lying inwait for you in the Strait between Ithaca and Samos, and they meanto kill you before you can reach home. I do not much think they willsucceed; it is more likely that some of those who are now eating upyour property will find a grave themselves. Sail night and day, andkeep your ship well away from the islands; the god who watches overyou and protects you will send you a fair wind. As soon as you getto Ithaca send your ship and men on to the town, but yourself gostraight to the swineherd who has charge your pigs; he is welldisposed towards you, stay with him, therefore, for the night, andthen send him to Penelope to tell her that you have got back safe fromPylos."
5、  Penelope, who was sleeping sweetly at the gates of dreamland,answered, "Sister, why have you come here? You do not come very often,but I suppose that is because you live such a long way off. Am I,then, to leave off crying and refrain from all the sad thoughts thattorture me? I, who have lost my brave and lion-hearted husband, whohad every good quality under heaven, and whose name was great over allHellas and middle Argos; and now my darling son has gone off onboard of a ship- a foolish fellow who has never been used toroughing it, nor to going about among gatherings of men. I am evenmore anxious about him than about my husband; I am all in a tremblewhen I think of him, lest something should happen to him, eitherfrom the people among whom he has gone, or by sea, for he has manyenemies who are plotting against him, and are bent on killing himbefore he can return home."

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  • 王凤春 08-09

      "Look to it yourself, father," answered Telemachus, "for they sayyou are the wisest counsellor in the world, and that there is no othermortal man who can compare with you. We will follow you with rightgood will, nor shall you find us fail you in so far as our strengthholds out."

  • 荷亭 08-09

      "Stranger, I should like to speak with you briefly about anothermatter. It is indeed nearly bed time- for those, at least, who cansleep in spite of sorrow. As for myself, heaven has given me a life ofsuch unmeasurable woe, that even by day when I am attending to myduties and looking after the servants, I am still weeping andlamenting during the whole time; then, when night comes, and we all ofus go to bed, I lie awake thinking, and my heart comes a prey to themost incessant and cruel tortures. As the dun nightingale, daughter ofPandareus, sings in the early spring from her seat in shadiestcovert hid, and with many a plaintive trill pours out the tale howby mishap she killed her own child Itylus, son of king Zethus, even sodoes my mind toss and turn in its uncertainty whether I ought tostay with my son here, and safeguard my substance, my bondsmen, andthe greatness of my house, out of regard to public opinion and thememory of my late husband, or whether it is not now time for me togo with the best of these suitors who are wooing me and making me suchmagnificent presents. As long as my son was still young, and unable tounderstand, he would not hear of my leaving my husband's house, butnow that he is full grown he begs and prays me to do so, beingincensed at the way in which the suitors are eating up his property.Listen, then, to a dream that I have had and interpret it for me ifyou can. I have twenty geese about the house that eat mash out of atrough, and of which I am exceedingly fond. I dreamed that a greateagle came swooping down from a mountain, and dug his curved beak intothe neck of each of them till he had killed them all. Presently hesoared off into the sky, and left them lying dead about the yard;whereon I wept in my room till all my maids gathered round me, sopiteously was I grieving because the eagle had killed my geese. Thenhe came back again, and perching on a projecting rafter spoke to mewith human voice, and told me to leave off crying. 'Be of goodcourage,' he said, 'daughter of Icarius; this is no dream, but avision of good omen that shall surely come to pass. The geese arethe suitors, and I am no longer an eagle, but your own husband, who amcome back to you, and who will bring these suitors to a disgracefulend.' On this I woke, and when I looked out I saw my geese at thetrough eating their mash as usual."

  • 胡劲松 08-09

       "Thence we sailed sadly on till the men were worn out with longand fruitless rowing, for there was no longer any wind to help them.Six days, night and day did we toil, and on the seventh day we reachedthe rocky stronghold of Lamus- Telepylus, the city of theLaestrygonians, where the shepherd who is driving in his sheep andgoats [to be milked] salutes him who is driving out his flock [tofeed] and this last answers the salute. In that country a man whocould do without sleep might earn double wages, one as a herdsman ofcattle, and another as a shepherd, for they work much the same bynight as they do by day.

  • 石毓智 08-09

      Telemachus went and knocked at the door of the women's room. "Makehaste," said he, "you old woman who have been set over all the otherwomen in the house. Come outside; my father wishes to speak to you."

  • 蕾妮·索莫菲尔德 08-08

    {  "'Stranger,' replied she, 'I will make it all quite clear to you.There is an old immortal who lives under the sea hereabouts andwhose name is Proteus. He is an Egyptian, and people say he is myfather; he is Neptune's head man and knows every inch of ground allover the bottom of the sea. If you can snare him and hold him tight,he will tell you about your voyage, what courses you are to take,and how you are to sail the sea so as to reach your home. He will alsotell you, if you so will, all that has been going on at your houseboth good and bad, while you have been away on your long and dangerousjourney.'

  • 斯维尔 08-07

      "I too," answered Theoclymenus, am an exile, for I have killed a manof my own race. He has many brothers and kinsmen in Argos, and theyhave great power among the Argives. I am flying to escape death attheir hands, and am thus doomed to be a wanderer on the face of theearth. I am your suppliant; take me, therefore, on board your shipthat they may not kill me, for I know they are in pursuit."}

  • 刘朋遂 08-07

      Minerva now made the suitors fall to laughing immoderately, andset their wits wandering; but they were laughing with a forcedlaughter. Their meat became smeared with blood; their eyes filled withtears, and their hearts were heavy with forebodings. Theoclymenussaw this and said, "Unhappy men, what is it that ails you? There isa shroud of darkness drawn over you from head to foot, your cheeks arewet with tears; the air is alive with wailing voices; the walls androof-beams drip blood; the gate of the cloisters and the courtbeyond them are full of ghosts trooping down into the night of hell;the sun is blotted out of heaven, and a blighting gloom is over allthe land."

  • 索普科 08-07

      They did as they were told, and set food before Ulysses, who ate anddrank ravenously, for it was long since he had had food of any kind.Meanwhile, Nausicaa bethought her of another matter. She got the linenfolded and placed in the waggon, she then yoked the mules, and, as shetook her seat, she called Ulysses:

  • 张益达 08-06

       Telemachus saw her long before any one else did. He was sittingmoodily among the suitors thinking about his brave father, and howhe would send them flying out of the house, if he were to come tohis own again and be honoured as in days gone by. Thus brooding ashe sat among them, he caught sight of Minerva and went straight to thegate, for he was vexed that a stranger should be kept waiting foradmittance. He took her right hand in his own, and bade her give himher spear. "Welcome," said he, "to our house, and when you havepartaken of food you shall tell us what you have come for."

  • 周辉龙 08-04

    {  "Thus did he pray, and Neptune heard his prayer. Then he picked up arock much larger than the first, swung it aloft and hurled it withprodigious force. It fell just short of the ship, but was within alittle of hitting the end of the rudder. The sea quaked as the rockfell into it, and the wash of the wave it raised drove us onwards onour way towards the shore of the island.

  • 郑钧 08-04

      Then Antinous said, "Queen Penelope, daughter of Icarius, take asmany presents as you please from any one who will give them to you; itis not well to refuse a present; but we will not go about our businessnor stir from where we are, till you have married the best man amongus whoever he may be."

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