0 盛昌娱乐下载-APP安装下载

盛昌娱乐下载 注册最新版下载

盛昌娱乐下载 注册

盛昌娱乐下载注册

类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:伍凤晶 大小:FZeL8oKy55963KB 下载:8XsB6Qqi83785次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:BcWMW1W922765条
日期:2020-08-05 02:08:07
安卓
高玉

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  As she spoke she shed sleep over his eyes, and then went back toOlympus.
2.  "But Polyphemus shouted to them from inside the cave, 'Noman iskilling me by fraud! Noman is killing me by force!'
3.  Thus did they converse, and they had only a very little time leftfor sleep, for it was soon daybreak. In the meantime Telemachus andhis crew were nearing land, so they loosed the sails, took down themast, and rowed the ship into the harbour. They cast out their mooringstones and made fast the hawsers; they then got out upon the seashore, mixed their wine, and got dinner ready. As soon as they had hadenough to eat and drink Telemachus said, "Take the ship on to thetown, but leave me here, for I want to look after the herdsmen onone of my farms. In the evening, when I have seen all I want, I willcome down to the city, and to-morrow morning in return for yourtrouble I will give you all a good dinner with meat and wine."
4.  "You shall go to bed as soon as you please," replied Penelope,"now that the gods have sent you home to your own good house and toyour country. But as heaven has put it in your mind to speak of it,tell me about the task that lies before you. I shall have to hearabout it later, so it is better that I should be told at once."
5.  "They all swore as I bade them, and when they had completed theiroath we made the ship fast in a harbour that was near a stream offresh water, and the men went ashore and cooked their suppers. As soonas they had had enough to eat and drink, they began talking abouttheir poor comrades whom Scylla had snatched up and eaten; this setthem weeping and they went on crying till they fell off into a soundsleep.
6.  "Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, it is now time for you to tellyour son: do not keep him in the dark any longer, but lay your plansfor the destruction of the suitors, and then make for the town. I willnot be long in joining you, for I too am eager for the fray."

计划指导

1.  BOOK VI.
2.  When Euryclea heard this she unfastened the door of the women's roomand came out, following Telemachus. She found Ulysses among thecorpses bespattered with blood and filth like a lion that has justbeen devouring an ox, and his breast and both his cheeks are allbloody, so that he is a fearful sight; even so was Ulyssesbesmirched from head to foot with gore. When she saw all the corpsesand such a quantity of blood, she was beginning to cry out for joy,for she saw that a great deed had been done; but Ulysses checkedher, "Old woman," said he, "rejoice in silence; restrain yourself, anddo not make any noise about it; it is an unholy thing to vaunt overdead men. Heaven's doom and their own evil deeds have brought thesemen to destruction, for they respected no man in the whole world,neither rich nor poor, who came near them, and they have come to a badend as a punishment for their wickedness and folly. Now, however, tellme which of the women in the house have misconducted themselves, andwho are innocent."
3.  Then turning to Antinous he said, "Antinous, you take as much careof my interests as though I were your son. Why should you want tosee this stranger turned out of the house? Heaven forbid; take'something and give it him yourself; I do not grudge it; I bid you takeit. Never mind my mother, nor any of the other servants in thehouse; but I know you will not do what I say, for you are more fond ofeating things yourself than of giving them to other people."
4.  "When they reached Circe's house they found it built of cutstones, on a site that could be seen from far, in the middle of theforest. There were wild mountain wolves and lions prowling all roundit- poor bewitched creatures whom she had tamed by her enchantmentsand drugged into subjection. They did not attack my men, but waggedtheir great tails, fawned upon them, and rubbed their noses lovinglyagainst them. As hounds crowd round their master when they see himcoming from dinner- for they know he will bring them something- evenso did these wolves and lions with their great claws fawn upon my men,but the men were terribly frightened at seeing such strange creatures.Presently they reached the gates of the goddess's house, and as theystood there they could hear Circe within, singing most beautifullyas she worked at her loom, making a web so fine, so soft, and ofsuch dazzling colours as no one but a goddess could weave. On thisPolites, whom I valued and trusted more than any other of my men,said, 'There is some one inside working at a loom and singing mostbeautifully; the whole place resounds with it, let us call her and seewhether she is woman or goddess.'
5.  "We are speaking god and goddess to one another, one another, andyou ask me why I have come here, and I will tell you truly as youwould have me do. Jove sent me; it was no doing of mine; who couldpossibly want to come all this way over the sea where there are nocities full of people to offer me sacrifices or choice hecatombs?Nevertheless I had to come, for none of us other gods can crossJove, nor transgress his orders. He says that you have here the mostill-starred of alf those who fought nine years before the city of KingPriam and sailed home in the tenth year after having sacked it. Ontheir way home they sinned against Minerva, who raised both wind andwaves against them, so that all his brave companions perished, andhe alone was carried hither by wind and tide. Jove says that you areto let this by man go at once, for it is decreed that he shall notperish here, far from his own people, but shall return to his houseand country and see his friends again."
6.  "This may not be, Agelaus," answered Melanthius, "the mouth of thenarrow passage is dangerously near the entrance to the outer court.One brave man could prevent any number from getting in. But I knowwhat I will do, I will bring you arms from the store room, for I amsure it is there that Ulysses and his son have put them."

推荐功能

1.  Thus did he speak. Every one approved his saying, and agreed that heshould have his escort inasmuch as he had spoken reasonably. Then whenthey had made their drink-offerings, and had drunk each as much ashe was minded they went home to bed every man in his own abode,leaving Ulysses in the cloister with Arete and Alcinous while theservants were taking the things away after supper. Arete was the firstto speak, for she recognized the shirt, cloak, and good clothes thatUlysses was wearing, as the work of herself and of her maids; so shesaid, "Stranger, before we go any further, there is a question Ishould like to ask you. Who, and whence are you, and who gave youthose clothes? Did you not say you had come here from beyond the sea?"
2.  "There it was that I heard news of Ulysses, for the king told mehe had entertained him, and shown him much hospitality while he was onhis homeward journey. He showed me also the treasure of gold, andwrought iron that Ulysses had got together. There was enough to keephis family for ten generations, so much had he left in the house ofking Pheidon. But the king said Ulysses had gone to Dodona that hemight learn Jove's mind from the god's high oak tree, and know whetherafter so long an absence he should return to Ithaca openly, or insecret. Moreover the king swore in my presence, making drink-offeringsin his own house as he did so, that the ship was by the water side,and the crew found, that should take him to his own country. He sentme off however before Ulysses returned, for there happened to be aThesprotian ship sailing for the wheat-growing island of Dulichium,and he told those in charge of her to be sure and take me safely toKing Acastus.
3.  He left the house as he spoke, and went back to Piraeus who gave himwelcome, but the suitors kept looking at one another and provokingTelemachus fly laughing at the strangers. One insolent fellow saidto him, "Telemachus, you are not happy in your guests; first youhave this importunate tramp, who comes begging bread and wine andhas no skill for work or for hard fighting, but is perfectlyuseless, and now here is another fellow who is setting himself up as aprophet. Let me persuade you, for it will be much better, to putthem on board ship and send them off to the Sicels to sell for whatthey will bring."
4.  When he had said this, he seated himself beside Alcinous. Supper wasthen served, and the wine was mixed for drinking. A servant led in thefavourite bard Demodocus, and set him in the midst of the company,near one of the bearing-posts supporting the cloister, that he mightlean against it. Then Ulysses cut off a piece of roast pork withplenty of fat (for there was abundance left on the joint) and saidto a servant, "Take this piece of pork over to Demodocus and tellhim to eat it; for all the pain his lays may cause me I will salutehim none the less; bards are honoured and respected throughout theworld, for the muse teaches them their songs and loves them."
5.   While they were thus busy getting their dinner ready, Rumour wentround the town, and noised abroad the terrible fate that hadbefallen the suitors; as soon, therefore, as the people heard of itthey gathered from every quarter, groaning and hooting before thehouse of Ulysses. They took the dead away, buried every man his own,and put the bodies of those who came from elsewhere on board thefishing vessels, for the fishermen to take each of them to his ownplace. They then met angrily in the place of assembly, and when theywere got together Eupeithes rose to speak. He was overwhelmed withgrief for the death of his son Antinous, who had been the first mankilled by Ulysses, so he said, weeping bitterly, "My friend, thisman has done the Achaeans great wrong. He took many of our best menaway with him in his fleet, and he has lost both ships and men; now,moreover, on his return he has been killing all the foremost men amongthe Cephallenians. Let us be up and doing before he can get away toPylos or to Elis where the Epeans rule, or we shall be ashamed ofourselves for ever afterwards. It will be an everlasting disgrace tous if we do not avenge the murder of our sons and brothers. For my ownpart I should have no mote pleasure in life, but had rather die atonce. Let us be up, then, and after them, before they can cross overto the mainland."
6.  Thus did he speak, and the others applauded his saying; they thenall of them went inside the buildings.

应用

1.  "Telemachus, I shall go upstairs and lie down on that sad couch,which I have not ceased to water with my tears, from the day Ulyssesset out for Troy with the sons of Atreus. You failed, however, to makeit clear to me before the suitors came back to the house, whether orno you had been able to hear anything about the return of yourfather."
2.  But Penelope lay in her own room upstairs unable to eat or drink,and wondering whether her brave son would escape, or be overpowered bythe wicked suitors. Like a lioness caught in the toils with huntsmenhemming her in on every side she thought and thought till she sankinto a slumber, and lay on her bed bereft of thought and motion.
3.  "Your discretion, my friend," answered Menelaus, "is beyond youryears. It is plain you take after your father. One can soon see when aman is son to one whom heaven has blessed both as regards wife andoffspring- and it has blessed Nestor from first to last all hisdays, giving him a green old age in his own house, with sons about himwho are both we disposed and valiant. We will put an end thereforeto all this weeping, and attend to our supper again. Let water bepoured over our hands. Telemachus and I can talk with one anotherfully in the morning."
4、  Thus did he pray. Jove heard his prayer and forthwith thundered highup among the from the splendour of Olympus, and Ulysses was gladwhen he heard it. At the same time within the house, a miller-womanfrom hard by in the mill room lifted up her voice and gave him anothersign. There were twelve miller-women whose business it was to grindwheat and barley which are the staff of life. The others had groundtheir task and had gone to take their rest, but this one had not yetfinished, for she was not so strong as they were, and when she heardthe thunder she stopped grinding and gave the sign to her master."Father Jove," said she, "you who rule over heaven and earth, you havethundered from a clear sky without so much as a cloud in it, andthis means something for somebody; grant the prayer, then, of meyour poor servant who calls upon you, and let this be the very lastday that the suitors dine in the house of Ulysses. They have worn meout with the labour of grinding meal for them, and I hope they maynever have another dinner anywhere at all."
5、  "We lit a fire, offered some of the cheeses in sacrifice, ate othersof them, and then sat waiting till the Cyclops should come in with hissheep. When he came, he brought in with him a huge load of dryfirewood to light the fire for his supper, and this he flung with sucha noise on to the floor of his cave that we hid ourselves for fearat the far end of the cavern. Meanwhile he drove all the ewesinside, as well as the she-goats that he was going to milk, leavingthe males, both rams and he-goats, outside in the yards. Then herolled a huge stone to the mouth of the cave- so huge that two andtwenty strong four-wheeled waggons would not be enough to draw it fromits place against the doorway. When he had so done he sat down andmilked his ewes and goats, all in due course, and then let each ofthem have her own young. He curdled half the milk and set it asidein wicker strainers, but the other half he poured into bowls that hemight drink it for his supper. When he had got through with all hiswork, he lit the fire, and then caught sight of us, whereon he said:

旧版特色

!

网友评论(9fkJS8uW89176))

  • 郑华君 08-04

      "We soon reached his cave, but he was out shepherding, so we wentinside and took stock of all that we could see. His cheese-rackswere loaded with cheeses, and he had more lambs and kids than his penscould hold. They were kept in separate flocks; first there were thehoggets, then the oldest of the younger lambs and lastly the veryyoung ones all kept apart from one another; as for his dairy, allthe vessels, bowls, and milk pails into which he milked, were swimmingwith whey. When they saw all this, my men begged me to let themfirst steal some cheeses, and make off with them to the ship; theywould then return, drive down the lambs and kids, put them on boardand sail away with them. It would have been indeed better if we haddone so but I would not listen to them, for I wanted to see theowner himself, in the hope that he might give me a present. When,however, we saw him my poor men found him ill to deal with.

  • 诺曼·所罗门 08-04

      Calypso knew him at once- for the gods all know each other, nomatter how far they live from one another- but Ulysses was not within;he was on the sea-shore as usual, looking out upon the barren oceanwith tears in his eyes, groaning and breaking his heart for sorrow.Calypso gave Mercury a seat and said: "Why have you come to see me,Mercury- honoured, and ever welcome- for you do not visit me often?Say what you want; I will do it for be you at once if I can, and if itcan be done at all; but come inside, and let me set refreshment beforeyou.

  • 李聚森 08-04

       Then Penelope went upstairs again and mourned her husband tillMinerva shed sleep over her eyes. In the evening Eumaeus got back toUlysses and his son, who had just sacrificed a young pig of a year oldand were ready; helping one another to get supper ready; Minervatherefore came up to Ulysses, turned him into an old man with a strokeof her wand, and clad him in his old clothes again, for fear thatthe swineherd might recognize him and not keep the secret, but goand tell Penelope.

  • 华清 08-04

      "I will tell you then truth," replied her son. "We went to Pylos andsaw Nestor, who took me to his house and treated me as hospitably asthough I were a son of his own who had just returned after a longabsence; so also did his sons; but he said he had not heard a wordfrom any human being about Ulysses, whether he was alive or dead. Hesent me, therefore, with a chariot and horses to Menelaus. There I sawHelen, for whose sake so many, both Argives and Trojans, were inheaven's wisdom doomed to suffer. Menelaus asked me what it was thathad brought me to Lacedaemon, and I told him the whole truth,whereon he said, 'So, then, these cowards would usurp a brave man'sbed? A hind might as well lay her new-born young in the lair of alion, and then go off to feed in the forest or in some grassy dell.The lion, when he comes back to his lair, will make short work withthe pair of them, and so will Ulysses with these suitors. By fatherJove, Minerva, and Apollo, if Ulysses is still the man that he waswhen he wrestled with Philomeleides in Lesbos, and threw him soheavily that all the Greeks cheered him- if he is still such, and wereto come near these suitors, they would have a short shrift and a sorrywedding. As regards your question, however, I will not prevaricate nordeceive you, but what the old man of the sea told me, so much will Itell you in full. He said he could see Ulysses on an islandsorrowing bitterly in the house of the nymph Calypso, who waskeeping him prisoner, and he could not reach his home, for he had noships nor sailors to take him over the sea.' This was what Menelaustold me, and when I had heard his story I came away; the gods thengave me a fair wind and soon brought me safe home again."

  • 冯慧萍 08-03

    {  "'Your brother and his ships escaped, for Juno protected him, butwhen he was just about to reach the high promontory of Malea, he wascaught by a heavy gale which carried him out to sea again sorelyagainst his will, and drove him to the foreland where Thyestes used todwell, but where Aegisthus was then living. By and by, however, itseemed as though he was to return safely after all, for the godsbacked the wind into its old quarter and they reached home; whereonAgamemnon kissed his native soil, and shed tears of joy at findinghimself in his own country.

  • 袁永华 08-02

      He counted his goodly coppers and cauldrons, his gold and all hisclothes, but there was nothing missing; still he kept grieving aboutnot being in his own country, and wandered up and down by the shore ofthe sounding sea bewailing his hard fate. Then Minerva came up tohim disguised as a young shepherd of delicate and princely mien,with a good cloak folded double about her shoulders; she had sandalson her comely feet and held a javelin in her hand. Ulysses was gladwhen he saw her, and went straight up to her.}

  • 罗家林 08-02

      As she spoke she shed sleep over his eyes, and then went back toOlympus.

  • 晏含 08-02

      "'Now there was a watchman whom Aegisthus kept always on thewatch, and to whom he had promised two talents of gold. This man hadbeen looking out for a whole year to make sure that Agamemnon didnot give him the slip and prepare war; when, therefore, this man sawAgamemnon go by, he went and told Aegisthus who at once began to lay aplot for him. He picked twenty of his bravest warriors and placed themin ambuscade on one side the cloister, while on the opposite side heprepared a banquet. Then he sent his chariots and horsemen toAgamemnon, and invited him to the feast, but he meant foul play. Hegot him there, all unsuspicious of the doom that was awaiting him, andkilled him when the banquet was over as though he were butchering anox in the shambles; not one of Agamemnon's followers was left alive,nor yet one of Aegisthus', but they were all killed there in thecloisters.'

  • 温良恭俭让 08-01

       On this she led the way, while Telemachus followed in her steps.When they got to the ship they found the crew waiting by the waterside, and Telemachus said, "Now my men, help me to get the stores onboard; they are all put together in the cloister, and my mother doesnot know anything about it, nor any of the maid servants except one."

  • 昌荣 07-30

    {  She said this to try him, but Ulysses was very angry and said,"Wife, I am much displeased at what you have just been saying. Who hasbeen taking my bed from the place in which I left it? He must havefound it a hard task, no matter how skilled a workman he was, unlesssome god came and helped him to shift it. There is no man living,however strong and in his prime, who could move it from its place, forit is a marvellous curiosity which I made with my very own hands.There was a young olive growing within the precincts of the house,in full vigour, and about as thick as a bearing-post. I built myroom round this with strong walls of stone and a roof to cover them,and I made the doors strong and well-fitting. Then I cut off the topboughs of the olive tree and left the stump standing. This I dressedroughly from the root upwards and then worked with carpenter's toolswell and skilfully, straightening my work by drawing a line on thewood, and making it into a bed-prop. I then bored a hole down themiddle, and made it the centre-post of my bed, at which I workedtill I had finished it, inlaying it with gold and silver; after this Istretched a hide of crimson leather from one side of it to theother. So you see I know all about it, and I desire to learn whetherit is still there, or whether any one has been removing it bycutting down the olive tree at its roots."

  • 芭芭拉米库尔斯基 07-30

      "Fall to, stranger," said he, "on a dish of servant's pork. Thefat pigs have to go to the suitors, who eat them up without shame orscruple; but the blessed gods love not such shameful doings, andrespect those who do what is lawful and right. Even the fiercefree-booters who go raiding on other people's land, and Jove givesthem their spoil- even they, when they have filled their ships and gothome again live conscience-stricken, and look fearfully for judgement;but some god seems to have told these people that Ulysses is deadand gone; they will not, therefore, go back to their own homes andmake their offers of marriage in the usual way, but waste his estateby force, without fear or stint. Not a day or night comes out ofheaven, but they sacrifice not one victim nor two only, and theytake the run of his wine, for he was exceedingly rich. No othergreat man either in Ithaca or on the mainland is as rich as he was; hehad as much as twenty men put together. I will tell you what he had.There are twelve herds of cattle upon the mainland, and as many flocksof sheep, there are also twelve droves of pigs, while his own menand hired strangers feed him twelve widely spreading herds of goats.Here in Ithaca he runs even large flocks of goats on the far end ofthe island, and they are in the charge of excellent goatherds. Eachone of these sends the suitors the best goat in the flock every day.As for myself, I am in charge of the pigs that you see here, and Ihave to keep picking out the best I have and sending it to them."

提交评论