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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:李珍 大小:o27tjyvT38724KB 下载:JLqg2J3o18675次
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日期:2020-08-06 19:35:36
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "My friends, this man will give us no quarter. He will stand wherehe is and shoot us down till he has killed every man among us. Letus then show fight; draw your swords, and hold up the tables to shieldyou from his arrows. Let us have at him with a rush, to drive him fromthe pavement and doorway: we can then get through into the town, andraise such an alarm as shall soon stay his shooting."
2.  "Sit where you are, and eat your victuals in silence, or be offelsewhere," shouted Antinous. "If you say more I will have you draggedhand and foot through the courts, and the servants shall flay youalive."
3.  "This is the house, father stranger, which you would have me showyou. You will find a number of great people sitting at table, but donot be afraid; go straight in, for the bolder a man is the more likelyhe is to carry his point, even though he is a stranger. First find thequeen. Her name is Arete, and she comes of the same family as herhusband Alcinous. They both descend originally from Neptune, who wasfather to Nausithous by Periboea, a woman of great beauty. Periboeawas the youngest daughter of Eurymedon, who at one time reigned overthe giants, but he ruined his ill-fated people and lost his own lifeto boot.
4.  Then the old woman took the cauldron in which she was going towash his feet, and poured plenty of cold water into it, adding hottill the bath was warm enough. Ulysses sat by the fire, but ere longhe turned away from the light, for it occurred to him that when theold woman had hold of his leg she would recognize a certain scar whichit bore, whereon the whole truth would come out. And indeed as soon asshe began washing her master, she at once knew the scar as one thathad been given him by a wild boar when he was hunting on MountParnassus with his excellent grandfather Autolycus- who was the mostaccomplished thief and perjurer in the whole world- and with thesons of Autolycus. Mercury himself had endowed him with this gift, forhe used to burn the thigh bones of goats and kids to him, so he tookpleasure in his companionship. It happened once that Autolycus hadgone to Ithaca and had found the child of his daughter just born. Assoon as he had done supper Euryclea set the infant upon his kneesand said, you must find a name for your grandson; you greatly wishedthat you might have one."
5.  As he spoke he drew the stool on which he rested his dainty feetfrom under the table, and made as though he would throw it at Ulysses,but the other suitors all gave him something, and filled his walletwith bread and meat; he was about, therefore, to go back to thethreshold and eat what the suitors had given him, but he first went upto Antinous and said:
6.  "Those who have seen us both," answered Ulysses, "have always saidwe were wonderfully like each other, and now you have noticed it too.

计划指导

1.  The bard inspired of heaven took up the story at the point wheresome of the Argives set fire to their tents and sailed away whileothers, hidden within the horse, were waiting with Ulysses in theTrojan place of assembly. For the Trojans themselves had drawn thehorse into their fortress, and it stood there while they sat incouncil round it, and were in three minds as to what they should do.Some were for breaking it up then and there; others would have itdragged to the top of the rock on which the fortress stood, and thenthrown down the precipice; while yet others were for letting it remainas an offering and propitiation for the gods. And this was how theysettled it in the end, for the city was doomed when it took in thathorse, within which were all the bravest of the Argives waiting tobring death and destruction on the Trojans. Anon he sang how thesons of the Achaeans issued from the horse, and sacked the town,breaking out from their ambuscade. He sang how they over ran thecity hither and thither and ravaged it, and how Ulysses went raginglike Mars along with Menelaus to the house of Deiphobus. It wasthere that the fight raged most furiously, nevertheless by Minerva'shelp he was victorious.
2.  "At first she would have nothing to do with his wicked scheme, forshe was of a good natural disposition; moreover there was a bardwith her, to whom Agamemnon had given strict orders on setting out forTroy, that he was to keep guard over his wife; but when heaven hadcounselled her destruction, Aegisthus thus this bard off to a desertisland and left him there for crows and seagulls to batten upon- afterwhich she went willingly enough to the house of Aegisthus. Then heoffered many burnt sacrifices to the gods, and decorated manytemples with tapestries and gilding, for he had succeeded far beyondhis expectations.
3.  "For shame, Sir," answered Ulysses, fiercely, "you are an insolentfellow- so true is it that the gods do not grace all men alike inspeech, person, and understanding. One man may be of weak presence,but heaven has adorned this with such a good conversation that hecharms every one who sees him; his honeyed moderation carries hishearers with him so that he is leader in all assemblies of hisfellows, and wherever he goes he is looked up to. Another may be ashandsome as a god, but his good looks are not crowned with discretion.This is your case. No god could make a finer looking fellow than youare, but you are a fool. Your ill-judged remarks have made meexceedingly angry, and you are quite mistaken, for I excel in agreat many athletic exercises; indeed, so long as I had youth andstrength, I was among the first athletes of the age. Now, however, Iam worn out by labour and sorrow, for I have gone through much both onthe field of battle and by the waves of the weary sea; still, in spiteof all this I will compete, for your taunts have stung me to thequick."
4.  This frightened Irus still more, but they brought him into themiddle of the court, and the two men raised their hands to fight. ThenUlysses considered whether he should let drive so hard at him as tomake an end of him then and there, or whether he should give him alighter blow that should only knock him down; in the end he deemedit best to give the lighter blow for fear the Achaeans should begin tosuspect who he was. Then they began to fight, and Irus hit Ulysseson the right shoulder; but Ulysses gave Irus a blow on the neckunder the ear that broke in the bones of his skull, and the blood camegushing out of his mouth; he fell groaning in the dust, gnashing histeeth and kicking on the ground, but the suitors threw up theirhands and nearly died of laughter, as Ulysses caught hold of him bythe foot and dragged him into the outer court as far as thegate-house. There he propped him up against the wall and put his staffin his hands. "Sit here," said he, "and keep the dogs and pigs off;you are a pitiful creature, and if you try to make yourself king ofthe beggars any more you shall fare still worse."
5.  "We lit a fire, offered some of the cheeses in sacrifice, ate othersof them, and then sat waiting till the Cyclops should come in with hissheep. When he came, he brought in with him a huge load of dryfirewood to light the fire for his supper, and this he flung with sucha noise on to the floor of his cave that we hid ourselves for fearat the far end of the cavern. Meanwhile he drove all the ewesinside, as well as the she-goats that he was going to milk, leavingthe males, both rams and he-goats, outside in the yards. Then herolled a huge stone to the mouth of the cave- so huge that two andtwenty strong four-wheeled waggons would not be enough to draw it fromits place against the doorway. When he had so done he sat down andmilked his ewes and goats, all in due course, and then let each ofthem have her own young. He curdled half the milk and set it asidein wicker strainers, but the other half he poured into bowls that hemight drink it for his supper. When he had got through with all hiswork, he lit the fire, and then caught sight of us, whereon he said:
6.  Thus spoke Menelaus, and the heart of Telemachus yearned as hebethought him of his father. Tears fell from his eyes as he heardhim thus mentioned, so that he held his cloak before his face withboth hands. When Menelaus saw this he doubted whether to let himchoose his own time for speaking, or to ask him at once and findwhat it was all about.

推荐功能

1.  Telemachus said, "I will answer you quite truly. I am from Ithaca,and my father is 'Ulysses, as surely as that he ever lived. But he hascome to some miserable end. Therefore I have taken this ship and gotmy crew together to see if I can hear any news of him, for he has beenaway a long time."
2.  Euryclea did as she was told, and bolted the women inside theirroom. Then Ulysses and his son made all haste to take the helmets,shields, and spears inside; and Minerva went before them with a goldlamp in her hand that shed a soft and brilliant radiance, whereonTelemachus said, "Father, my eyes behold a great marvel: the walls,with the rafters, crossbeams, and the supports on which they restare all aglow as with a flaming fire. Surely there is some god herewho has come down from heaven."
3.  This made Minerva still more furious, so she scolded Ulysses veryangrily. "Ulysses," said she, "your strength and prowess are no longerwhat they were when you fought for nine long years among the Trojansabout the noble lady Helen. You killed many a man in those days, andit was through your stratagem that Priam's city was taken. How comesit that you are so lamentably less valiant now that you are on yourown ground, face to face with the suitors in your own house? Comeon, my good fellow, stand by my side and see how Mentor, son ofAlcinous shall fight your foes and requite your kindnesses conferredupon him."
4.  Then was Ulysses glad and prayed aloud saying, "Father Jove, grantthat Alcinous may do all as he has said, for so he will win animperishable name among mankind, and at the same time I shall returnto my country."
5.   He counted his goodly coppers and cauldrons, his gold and all hisclothes, but there was nothing missing; still he kept grieving aboutnot being in his own country, and wandered up and down by the shore ofthe sounding sea bewailing his hard fate. Then Minerva came up tohim disguised as a young shepherd of delicate and princely mien,with a good cloak folded double about her shoulders; she had sandalson her comely feet and held a javelin in her hand. Ulysses was gladwhen he saw her, and went straight up to her.
6.  Thus spoke Antinous, but Telemachus heeded him not. Meanwhile theheralds were bringing the holy hecatomb through the city, and theAchaeans gathered under the shady grove of Apollo.

应用

1.  Then was Ulysses glad and prayed aloud saying, "Father Jove, grantthat Alcinous may do all as he has said, for so he will win animperishable name among mankind, and at the same time I shall returnto my country."
2.  She went straight to the beautifully decorated bedroom in whichthere slept a girl who was as lovely as a goddess, Nausicaa,daughter to King Alcinous. Two maid servants were sleeping near her,both very pretty, one on either side of the doorway, which wasclosed with well-made folding doors. Minerva took the form of thefamous sea captain Dymas's daughter, who was a bosom friend ofNausicaa and just her own age; then, coming up to the girl's bedsidelike a breath of wind, she hovered over her head and said:
3.  Then Menelaus said, "All that you have been saying, my dear wife, istrue. I have travelled much, and have had much to do with heroes,but I have never seen such another man as Ulysses. What endurance too,and what courage he displayed within the wooden horse, wherein all thebravest of the Argives were lying in wait to bring death anddestruction upon the Trojans. At that moment you came up to us; somegod who wished well to the Trojans must have set you on to it andyou had Deiphobus with you. Three times did you go all round ourhiding place and pat it; you called our chiefs each by his own name,and mimicked all our wives -Diomed, Ulysses, and I from our seatsinside heard what a noise you made. Diomed and I could not make up ourminds whether to spring out then and there, or to answer you frominside, but Ulysses held us all in check, so we sat quite still, allexcept Anticlus, who was beginning to answer you, when Ulysses clappedhis two brawny hands over his mouth, and kept them there. It wasthis that saved us all, for he muzzled Anticlus till Minerva tookyou away again."
4、  To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "The stranger is quitereasonable. He is avoiding the suitors, and is only doing what any oneelse would do. He asks you to wait till sundown, and it will be muchbetter, madam, that you should have him all to yourself, when youcan hear him and talk to him as you will."
5、  "Then I said, 'I wish I could be as sure of killing you outright andsending you down to the house of Hades, as I am that it will take morethan Neptune to cure that eye of yours.'

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  • 张海进 08-05

      "Maids, servants of Ulysses who has so long been absent, go to thequeen inside the house; sit with her and amuse her, or spin, andpick wool. I will hold the light for all these people. They may staytill morning, but shall not beat me, for I can stand a great deal."

  • 张依伯 08-05

      They all held their peace till at last Agelaus son of Damastor said,"No one should take offence at what has just been said, nor gainsayit, for it is quite reasonable. Leave off, therefore, ill-treating thestranger, or any one else of the servants who are about the house; Iwould say, however, a friendly word to Telemachus and his mother,which I trust may commend itself to both. 'As long,' I would say,'as you had ground for hoping that Ulysses would one day come home, noone could complain of your waiting and suffering the suitors to bein your house. It would have been better that he should have returned,but it is now sufficiently clear that he will never do so; thereforetalk all this quietly over with your mother, and tell her to marry thebest man, and the one who makes her the most advantageous offer.Thus you will yourself be able to manage your own inheritance, andto eat and drink in peace, while your mother will look after someother man's house, not yours."'

  • 刘晶晶 08-05

       When he had thus spoken, he said to his son Mercury, "Mercury, youare our messenger, go therefore and tell Calypso we have decreedthat poor Ulysses is to return home. He is to be convoyed neither bygods nor men, but after a perilous voyage of twenty days upon a rafthe is to reach fertile Scheria, the land of the Phaeacians, who arenear of kin to the gods, and will honour him as though he were oneof ourselves. They will send him in a ship to his own country, andwill give him more bronze and gold and raiment than he would havebrought back from Troy, if he had had had all his prize money andhad got home without disaster. This is how we have settled that heshall return to his country and his friends."

  • 阿里尔 08-05

      To this Telemachus answered, "By Jove, Agelaus, and by the sorrowsof my unhappy father, who has either perished far from Ithaca, or iswandering in some distant land, I throw no obstacles in the way ofmy mother's marriage; on the contrary I urge her to choosewhomsoever she will, and I will give her numberless gifts into thebargain, but I dare not insist point blank that she shall leave thehouse against her own wishes. Heaven forbid that I should do this."

  • 余熙鸣 08-04

    {  Thus did Ulysses sleep, and the young men slept beside him. Butthe swineherd did not like sleeping away from his pigs, so he gotready to go and Ulysses was glad to see that he looked after hisproperty during his master's absence. First he slung his sword overhis brawny shoulders and put on a thick cloak to keep out the wind. Healso took the skin of a large and well fed goat, and a javelin in caseof attack from men or dogs. Thus equipped he went to his rest wherethe pigs were camping under an overhanging rock that gave them shelterfrom the North wind.

  • 向董艳 08-03

      "At any other time," replied Telemachus, "I should have bidden yougo to my own house, for you would find no want of hospitality; atthe present moment, however, you would not be comfortable there, for Ishall be away, and my mother will not see you; she does not often showherself even to the suitors, but sits at her loom weaving in anupper chamber, out of their way; but I can tell you a man whosehouse you can go to- I mean Eurymachus the son of Polybus, who is heldin the highest estimation by every one in Ithaca. He is much thebest man and the most persistent wooer, of all those who are payingcourt to my mother and trying to take Ulysses' place. Jove, however,in heaven alone knows whether or no they will come to a bad end beforethe marriage takes place."}

  • 关原 08-03

      On this pale fear laid hold of them, and old Halitherses, son ofMastor, rose to speak, for he was the only man among them who knewboth past and future; so he spoke to them plainly and in allhonesty, saying,

  • 林浩贤 08-03

      The pair went into the outer court as fast as they could, and satdown by Jove's great altar, looking fearfully round, and stillexpecting that they would be killed. Then Ulysses searched the wholecourt carefully over, to see if anyone had managed to hide himself andwas still living, but he found them all lying in the dust andweltering in their blood. They were like fishes which fishermen havenetted out of the sea, and thrown upon the beach to lie gasping forwater till the heat of the sun makes an end of them. Even so werethe suitors lying all huddled up one against the other.

  • 英特 08-02

       Medon caught these words of Telemachus, for he was crouching under aseat beneath which he had hidden by covering himself up with a freshlyflayed heifer's hide, so he threw off the hide, went up to Telemachus,and laid hold of his knees.

  • 詹皇生 07-31

    {  Then Ulysses in his turn melted, and wept as he clasped his dear andfaithful wife to his bosom. As the sight of land is welcome to men whoare swimming towards the shore, when Neptune has wrecked their shipwith the fury of his winds and waves- a few alone reach the land,and these, covered with brine, are thankful when they findthemselves on firm ground and out of danger- even so was her husbandwelcome to her as she looked upon him, and she could not tear hertwo fair arms from about his neck. Indeed they would have gone onindulging their sorrow till rosy-fingered morn appeared, had notMinerva determined otherwise, and held night back in the far west,while she would not suffer Dawn to leave Oceanus, nor to yoke thetwo steeds Lampus and Phaethon that bear her onward to break the dayupon mankind.

  • 武田氏 07-31

      The swineherd went back when he heard this, and Penelope said as shesaw him cross the threshold, "Why do you not bring him here,Eumaeus? Is he afraid that some one will ill-treat him, or is he shyof coming inside the house at all? Beggars should not be shamefaced."

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