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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:白素贞 大小:EdNZmPrh26553KB 下载:mNG934eU42372次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:xWDuOdBf88817条
日期:2020-08-09 02:31:26
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Is not this good Goblins fare?
2.  When Bernardo heard these words, they were as so many stabs to hisheart, yea, beyond all compasse of patient sufferance, and by thechanging of his colour, it was noted manifestly, (being unable toutter one word) that Ambroginolo had spoken nothing but the truth.Within a while after, he saide; Gentlemen, that which Ambroginolo hathsaide, is very true, wherefore let him come when he will, and he shallbe paide; which accordingly he performed on the very next day, even tothe utmost penny, departing then from Paris towards Geneway, with amost malitious intention to his Wife: Being come neere to the City, hewould not enter it, but rode to a Country house of his, standing abouttenne miles distant thence. Being there arrived, he called aservant, in whom hee reposed especiall trust, sending him to Genewaywith two Horses, writing to his Wife, that he was returned, and sheeshould come thither to see him. But secretly he charged his servant,that so soone as he had brought her to a convenient place, he shouldthere kill her, without any pitty or compassion, and then returne tohim againe.
3.  But if all other devises els had failed, my pen was and is myprevayling Champion, where-with I would have written such and somany strange matters, concerning you in your very dearestreputation; that you should have curst the houre of your conception,and wisht your birth had bin abortive. The powers of the pen are toomany and mighty, wherof such weake wits as have made no experience,are the lesse able to use any relation. I sweare to you Lady, by mybest hopes, that this revenge which (perhappes) you esteeme greatand dishonourable, is no way compareable to the wounding Lines of aPenne, which can carracter downe so infinite infamies (yet none butguilty and true taxations) as will make your owne hands immediateinstruments, to teare the eyes from forth your head, and so bequeathyour after dayes unto perpetuall darkenesse.
4.  No soule so comfortlesse, etc.
5.  It came to passe, that in so great a concourse of people, asresorted thither from all parts; three of our Citizens went toTrevers, one of them being named Stechio, the second Martellino, andthe third Marquiso, all being men of such condition, as frequentedPrinces Courts, to give them delight by pleasant and counterfettedqualities. None of these men having ever beene at Trevers before,seeing how the people crowded thorow the streetes, wondered greatlythereat: but when they knew the reason why the throngs ranne on heapesin such sort together, they grew as desirous to see the Shrine, as anyof the rest. Having ordered all affaires at their lodging, Marquisosaide; It is fit for us to see this Saint, but I know not how we shallattaine thereto, because (as I have heard) the place is guarded byGermaine Souldiers, and other warlike men, commanded thither by theGovernour of this City, least any outrage should be there committed:And beside, the Church is so full of people, as we shall nevercompasse to get neere. Martellino being also as forward in desire tosee it, presently replied. All this difficulty cannot dismay me, but Iwill go to the very body of the Saint it selfe. But how? quothMarquiso. I will tell thee, answered Martellino. I purpose to go inthe disguise of an impotent lame person, supported on the one sideby thy selfe, and on the other by Stechio, as if I were not able towalke of my selfe: And you two thus sustaining me, desiring to comeneere the Saint to cure me; every one will make way, and freely giveyou leave to go on.
6.  Nor was there any winde at all stirring, whereby to asswage theSunnes violent scalding, or keepe away huge swarmes of Waspes,Hornets, and terrible byting Flyes, which vexed her extreamely,feeding on those parts of her body, that were rifte and chinkt, likecrannies in a mortered wall, and pained her like so many points ofpricking Needles, labouring still with her hands to beate them away,but yet they fastned on one place or other, and afflicted her ingrievous manner, causing her to curse her owne life, hir amorousfriend, but (most of all) the Scholler, that promised to bring herGarments, and as yet returned not. Now began she to gaze upon everyside about her, to espy some labouring Husbandmen in the fields, towhom she might call or cry out for helpe, not fearing to discoverher desperate condition: but Fortune therein also was adverse toher, because the heats extreamity, had driven all the village out ofthe fields, causing them to feede their Cattle about theyr ownehouses, or in remote and shadie Valleyes: so that shee could see noother creatures to comfort her, but Swannes swimming in the River ofArno, and wishing her selfe there a thousand times with them, for tocoole the extreamity of her thirst, which so much the moreencreased, onely by the sight thereof, and utterly disabled ofhaving any.

计划指导

1.  After some few dayes were passed over, and the hurts in his faceindifferently cured; Blondello beginning to walke abroade againe,chanced to meet with Guiotto: who laughing heartily at him, sayde.Tell me Blondello, how doost thou like the enrubinating Clarret ofSignior Phillippo? As well (quoth Blondello) as thou didst theSturgeon and Lampreyes at Messer Corso Donaties. Why then (saydeGuiotto) let these two tokens continue familiar betweene thee andme, when thou wouldst bestow such another dinner on mee, then wil Ienrubinate thy nose with a bottle of the same Claret. But Blondelloperceived (to his cost) that hee had met with the worser bargaine, andGuiotto got cheare, without any blowes: and therefore desired apeacefull attonement, each of them (alwayes after) abstaining fromflouting one another.
2.  Melisso marvelling at her froward answere, rebuked her for it invery kind manner: whereupon, Giosefo spake thus to her. I perceivewife, you are the same woman as you were wount to be: but beleeve meon my word, I shal quite alter you from this curst complexion. Soturning to Melisso, thus he proceeded. Noble friend, we shall tryanone, whether the counsell of King Salomon bee effectuall, or no; andI pray you, let it not be offensive to you to see it; but ratherhold all to be done in merriment. And because I would not behindered by you, doe but remember the answere which the Mulettergave us, when we tooke compassion on his Mule. Worthy friend,replyed Melisso, I am in your owne house, where I purpose not toimpeach whatsoever you doe.
3.  All the neighboring people dwelling thereabout, who knew Massetto tobe dumbe, by fetching home wood daily from the Forest, and diversemployments in other places, were made to beleeve, that by theNunnes devout prayers and discipline, as also the merite of the Saint,in whose honour the Monastery was built and erected, Massetto hadhis long restrained speech restored, and was now become their soleFactotum, having power now to employ others in drudgeries, and easehimselfe of all such labours. And albeit he made the Nunnes to befruitfull, by encreasing some store of yonger sisters, yet all matterswere so close and cleanly catried, as it was never talkt of, tillafter the death of the Ladie Abbesse, when Massetto beganne to grow ingood yeeres, and desired to returne home to his native abiding,which (within a while after) was granted him.
4.  While matters went on in this successefull manner, although he couldnot chuse, but still he remembred his cruell Mistresse, and was verydesperately transported for her love, as coveting (above all thingselse) to see her once more; yet was he of such powerfull constancy, as7 whole yeeres together, he vanquished all those fierce conflicts. Buton a day it chanced he heard a song sung in Cyprus, which hehimselfe had formerly made, in honour of the love he bare to hisMistresse, and what delight he conceived, by being dayly in herpresence; whereby he gathered, that it was impossible for him toforget her, and proceeded on so desirously, as he could not live,except he had a sight of her once more, and therefore determined onhis returne to Florence. Having set all his affaires in due order,accompanied with a servant of his onely, he passed to Ancona, wherewhen he was arrived, he sent his Merchandises to Florence, in nameof the Merchant of Ancona, who was his especiall friend and partner;travayling himselfe alone with his servant, in the habite of aPilgrime, as if he had beene newly returned from Jerusalem.
5.  I see, I heare, and feele a kinde of blisse,
6.  No sooner did Constance behold him, but she was ready to dye withconceite of joy, and being unable to containe her passion: sodainelyshe threw her armes about his necke, and in meere compassion of hermany misfortunes, as also the instant solace of her soule (not beingable to utter one word) the teares trickled abundantly downe hercheekes. Martuccio also seeing his faire friend, was overcome withexceeding admiration, and stood awhile, as not knowing what to say;till venting forth a vehement sighe, thus he spake. My deerest loveConstance! Art thou yet living? It is a tedious long while since Iheard thou wast lost, and never any tydings knowne of thee in thineowne Fathers house. With which words, the teares standing in his eyes,most lovingly he embraced her, Constance recounted to him all herfortunes, and what kindnesse she had receyved from the SarazineLady, since her first houre of comming to her. And after much otherdiscourse passing betweene them, Martuccio departed from her, andreturning to the King his master, tolde him all the history of hisfortunes, and those beside of his Love Constance, being purposelyminded (with his gracious liking) to marry her according to theChristian Law.

推荐功能

1.  WHEREIN IS COVERTLY GIVEN TO UNDERSTAND, THAT HOWSOEVER A PRINCE
2.  No sooner was he gone, but the Abbot beganne to consider withhimselfe, what he were best to doe in this case, either (in thepresence of all the other Monkes) to open the Chamber doore, that sothe offence being knowne to them all, they might have no occasion ofmurmuring against him, when he proceeded in the Monkes punishment;or rather should first understand of the Damosell her selfe, how,and in what manner shee was brought thither. Furthermore, heconsidered, that shee might be a woman of respect, or some such mansdaughter, as would not take it well, to have her disgraced beforeall the Monkes. Wherefore hee concluded, first to see (himselfe)what shee was, and then (afterward) to resolve upon the rest. So goingvery softly to the Chamber, and entring in, locked the doore fast withthe key, when the poore Damosell thinking it had beene the gallantyoung Monke; but finding it to be the Lord Abbot, shee fell on herknees weeping, as fearing now to receive publike shame, by beingbetrayed in this unkinde manner.
3.  As I have heeretofore heard (Gracious Ladies) there lived awealthy Marchant in Paris, being a Mercer, or seller of Silkes,named Jehannot de Chevigny, a man of faithfull, honest, and uprightdealing; who held great affection and friendship with a very rich Jew,named Abraham, that was a Merchant also, and a man of very directconversation. Jehannot well noting the honesty and loyall dealing ofthis Jew, began to have a Religious kinde of compassion in hissoule, much pittying that a man so good in behaviour, so wise anddiscreete in all his actions, should be in danger of perditionthorow want of Faith. In which regard, lovingly he began to intreatehim, that he would leave the errors of his Jewish beleefe, andfollow the truth of Christianity, which he evidently saw (as beinggood and holy) daily to prosper and enlarge it selfe, whereas on thecontrary, his profession decreased, and grew to nothing.
4.  SUFFER THEMSELVES TO BE DECEIVED BY THEM: MUST SHARPEN THEIR WITS,
5.   And let him wander wheresoere he goes,
6.  Now concerning the skilfull Magitian, to whom Ansaldo meant togive the bountifull recompence agreed on betweene them, hee havingseene the strange liberality, which the husband expressed to SigniorAnsaldo, and that of Ansaldo to the Lady, hee presently saide. Greatjupiter strike me dead with thunder, having my selfe seene a husbandso liberall of his honour, and you Sir of true noble kindnesse, if Ishould not be the like of my recompence: for, perceiving it to be soworthily imployed, I am well contented that you shal keepe it. TheNoble Lord was modestly ashamed, and strove (so much as in him lay)that he should take all, or the greater part thereof: but seeing helaboured meerly in vaine, after the third day was past, and theMagitian had destroyed the Garden againe, hee gave him free liberty todepart, quite controlling all fond and unchaste affection in himselfe,either towards Dianora, or any Lady else, and living (ever after) asbest becommeth any Nobleman to do.

应用

1.  Through deepe desire;
2.  The Abbot, laying his arme over the others body, began to imbraceand hugge him; even as amorous friends (provoked by earnestaffection), use to doe. Whereat Alessandro verie much mervayling,and being an Italian himselfe, fearing least this folly in theAbbot, would convert to foule and dishonest action, shrunke modestlyfrom him. Which the Abbot perceiving, and doubting least Alessandrowould depart and leave him, pleasantly smiling, and with bashfullbehaviour baring his stomack, he tooke Alessandroes hand, and layingit thereon, saide; Alessandro, let all bad thoughts of bestiallabuse be farre off from thee, and feele here, to resolve thee from allsuch feare. Allessandro feeling the Abbots brest, found there twopretty little mountaines, round, plumpe, and smooth, appearing as ifthey had beene of polished Ivory; whereby he perceived, that the Abbotwas a woman: which, setting an edge on his youthful desires, madehim fall to embracing, and immediately he offered to kisse her; butshe somewhat rudely repulsing him, as halfe offended, saide.
3.  The Physitian laboured to excuse himselfe, declaring his misfortunesat large, and into what a filthy place he was throwne. It maketh nomatter (answered Buffalmaco) I would you had bin throwen from offthe Bridge into Arno, where you might have beene recommended to theDivell and all his Saints. Did not I tell you so much before. Ingood sadnesse (quoth the Doctor) I neyther commended my selfe toGod, nor any of his Saints. How? sayde Buffalmaco, I am sure youwill not maintaine an untruth, you used a kind of recommendation:for our messenger told us, that you talked of God, S. Dominicke, andyour good Angell, whom you desired to assist you, being soaffrighted with feare, that you trembled like a leafe upon a tree, notknowing indeede where you were. Thus have you unfaithfully dealtwith us, as never any man shall doe the like againe, in seekinghonour, and losing it through your own negligence.
4、  Dazeling my sence, did overecome me quite,
5、  Nor was dismaide.

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网友评论(LykNSch827815))

  • 熊罡 08-08

      These words were not a little welcome to my Lord Abbot, because(thereby) he halfe assured himselfe, that Fortune had laid open thepath to his hoped pleasures. Whereupon he said. Deare daughter, I makeno question to the contrary, but it must needes be an exceedinginfelicity, to so faire and goodly a young woman as you are, to beplagued with so sottish an husband, brainsick, and without the useof common understanding; but yet subject to a more hellishaffliction then all these, namely jealousie, and therefore you beingin this wofull manner tormented, your tribulations are not only somuch the more credited, but also as amply grieved for, and pittied. Inwhich heavy and irksome perturbations, I see not any meanes of remedy,but onely one, being a kinde of physicke (beyond all other) to curehim of his foolish jealousie; which medicine is very familiar to me,because I know best how to compound it, alwayes provided, that you canbe of so strong a capacity, as to be secret in what I shall say untoyou.

  • 赖思臻 08-08

      It came to passe, that in the reporting of this discourse, there wasthen a Gentleman in the company, named Guillemino da Medicina, whoat the surprizall of the City, was present with Guidotto of Cremona,and knew well the House which he had ransacked, the owner whereofwas also present with him, wherefore taking him aside, he said to him.Bernardino, hearest thou what Jacomino hath related? Yes very well,replyed Bernardino, and remember withall, that in that dismallbloody combustion, I lost a little Daughter, about the age as Jacominospeaketh. Questionlesse then replyed Guillemino, she must needs be thesame young Mayden, for I was there at the same time, and in the House,whence Guidotto did bring both the Girle and goods, and I do perfectlyremember, that it was thy House. I pray thee call to minde, ifeverthou sawest any scarre or marke about her, which may revive thyformer knowledge of her, for my minde perswades me, that the Maideis thy Daughter.

  • 洪星仁 08-08

       LOVE TO THEM: EXCEPT THEY INTEND TO SEEKE THEIR OWNE

  • 吉吉利利 08-08

      By the Lords and Ladies she was joyfully entertained, and comminginto the great Hall, where the tables were readily covered:Grizelda, in her homely Country habite, humbled her selfe beforeher, saying. Gracious welcome, to the new elected Spouse of the LordMarquesse.

  • 弗·伊里奇 08-07

    {  As I poore amorous Maide.

  • 陈志佳 08-06

      When she saw that he offered her no other violence, but gave hersuch vaunting and reproachfull speeches, holding still the young manbefore her face, meerely vexe and despight her: shee began to takeheart, and thus replied. Doest thou compare mee with the Wife ofHerculano, who is an old, dissembling hypocrite? Yet she can have ofhim whatsoever shee desireth, and he useth her as a woman ought to be,which favour I could never yet finde at thy hands. Put the case,that thou keepest me in good garments; allowing mee to goe neatlyhosed and shod; yet well thou knowest, there are other meere mattersbelonging to a woman, and every way as necessarily required, bothfor the preservation of Houshold quietnesse, and those other ritesbetweene a Husband and Wife. Let mee be worser garmented, courserdieted, yea, debarred of all pleasure and delights; so I might once beworthy the name of a Mother, and leave some remembrance ofwoman-hood behinde me. I tell thee plainely Pedro, I am a woman asothers are, and subject to the same desires, as (by nature)attendeth on flesh and blood: looke how thou failest in kindnessetowards me, thinke it not amisse, if I doe the like to thee, andendeavour thou to win the worthy title of a Father, because I was madeto be a Mother.}

  • 章小蕙 08-06

      When Mithridanes heard him speake, and looked advisedly on his face,he knew him immediately to be the same man, that had entertained himso lovingly, conversed with him so familiarly, and counselled him sofaithfully: all which overcomming his former fury, his harsh naturebecame meerly confounded with shame: So throwing downe his drawnesword, which he held readily prepared for the deede: he prostratedhimselfe at Nathans feet, and in teares, spake in this manner. Nowdo I manifestly know (most loving Father) your admired bounty andliberalitie; considering, with what industrious providence, you madethe meanes for your comming hither, prodigally to bestow your lifeon me, which I have no right unto, although you were so willing topart with it. But those high and supreame powers, more carefull ofmy dutie, then I my selfe: even at the very instant, and when it wasmost needfull, opened the eyes of my better understanding, whichinternall envy had closed up before. And therefore, looke how much youhave bin forward to pleasure me; so much the more shame andpunishment, I confesse my heinous transgression hath justlydeserved: take therefore on me (if you please) such revenge, as youthinke (in justice) answerable to my sin.

  • 欧阳克 08-06

      There lived sometime in the kingdome of France, a Gentleman namedIsnarde, being the Count of Roussillion: who because hee wascontinually weake, crazie, and sickly, kept a Physitian daily in hishouse, who was called Master Gerard of Narbona. Count Isnarde hadone onely Sonne, very young in yeares, yet of towardly hope, faire,comely, and of pleasing person, named Bertrand; with whom, manyother children of his age, had their education: and among them, adaughter of the fore-named Physitian, called juliet; who, even inthese tender yeares, fixed her affection upon young Bertrand, withsuch an earnest and intimate resolution, as was most admirable in soyong a Maiden, and more then many times is noted in yeares ofgreater discretion. Old Count Isnarde dying, young Bertrand fell asa Ward to the King, and being sent to Paris, remained there underhis royall custodie and protection, to no little discomfort of youngJuliet, who became greevously afflicted in minde, because she had lostthe company of Bertrand.

  • 杨秀美 08-05

       The lines contained in this Ditty, Manutio fitted with noates somooving and singularly musicall, that every word had the seisiblemotion of life in it, where the King being (as yet) not risen from theTable, he commanded him to use both his Lute and voyce.

  • 诸正伟 08-03

    {  Never make you any doubt Sir, but that I can sufficiently performewhatsoever you have said, and am provided of the onely place in theworld, where such a weighty businesse is to be effected. For I havea Farme or dairy house, neere adjoyning to the vale of Arno, andclosely bordering upon the same River. It beeing now the moneth ofjuly, the most convenientest time of all the yeare to bathe in; Ican bee the easier induced thereunto.

  • 胡良才 08-03

      Well may I curse that sad and dismall day,

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