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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:张杰才 大小:N3sM244h71786KB 下载:Dc7ucGgX25128次
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日期:2020-08-05 15:39:37
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潘家沂

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Upon further inquisition, who should commit horrid a deede,perceyving likewise that the Duke of Athens was not to be found, butwas closely gone: they judged (according to the truth) that he had hishand in this bloody businesse, and had carried away the Lady with him.Immediately, they elected the Princes brother to be their Lord andSoveraigne, inciting him to revenge so horrid a wrong, and promisingto assist him with their utmost power. The new chosen Prince beingassured afterward, by other more apparant and remarkeable proofes,that his people informed him With nothing but truth: sodainly, andaccording as they had concluded, with the help of neighbors, kindredand frends, collected from divers places; he mustred a good andpowerfull army, marching on towards Athens, to make war against theDuke.
2.  AFTERWARD TO A FARRE HIGHER DEGREE
3.  THE EIGHT DAY, THE THIRD NOVELL
4.  After this her secret consultation, her husband was no sooner goneforth at one doore, but shee did the like at another, yet sosecretly as possibly she could devise to doe, and (without anydelaying) she went to the Wood, wherein she hid her selfe veryclosely, among the thickest of the bushes, yet could discerne everyway about her, if any body should offer to passe by her. While sheekept her selfe in this concealment, suspecting other mysteriousmatters, as her idle imagination had tutord her, rather then thedanger of any Wolfe: out of a brakie thicket by her, sodainly rushed ahuge and dreadfull Wolfe, as having found her by the sent, mountinguppe, and grasping her throat in his mouth, before she saw him, orcould call to heaven for mercy.
5.  Come now likewise to the other side. What occasions could compellNoble Titus, so promptly and deliberatly, to procure his owne death,to rescue his friend from the crosse, and inflict the pain and shameupon himselfe, pretending not [to] see or know Gisippus at all, had itnot bin wrought by powerfull Amity? What cause else could make Titusso liberall, in dividing (with such willingnesse) the larger part ofhis patrimony to Gisippus, when Fortune had dispossest him of hisowne, but onely heaven-borne Amity? What else could have procuredTitus, without any further dilation, feare or suspition, to give hisSister Fulvia in marriage to Gisippus, when he saw him reduced to suchextreame poverty, disgrace and misery, but onely infinite Amity? Towhat end doe men care then, to covet and procure great multitudes ofkinred, store of brethren, numbers of children, and to encrease(with their owne monyes) plenty of servants: when by the least losseand dammage happening, they forget all duty to Father, Brother, orMaster? Amity and true friendship is of a quite contrary nature,satisfying (in that sacred bond) the obligation due to all degrees,both of parentage, and all alliences else.
6.  Master Can de la Scala, who was a man of good understanding,perceived immediately (without any further interpretation) whatBergamino meant by this morall, and smiling on him, saide:Bergamino, thou hast honestly expressed thy vertue and necessities,and justly reprooved mine avarice, niggardnesse, and base folly. Andtrust me Bergamino, I never felt such a fit of covetousnesse come uponme, as this which I have dishonestly declared to thee: and which Iwill now banish from me, with the same correction as thou hasttaught mee. So, having payed the Host all his charges, redeemingalso his robes or garments, mounting him on a good Gelding, andputting plenty of Crownes in his purse, he referd it to his ownechoise to depart, or dwell there still with him.

计划指导

1.  Worthy Ladies, I am sure it is not unknowne to you, that it is,and hath bene a generall passion, to all men and women living, tosee divers and sundry things while they are sleeping. And although (tothe sleeper) they seeme most certaine, so that when he awaketh, hejudgeth the trueth of some, the likelyhood of others, and somebeyond all possibility of truth: yet notwithstanding, many dreameshave bene observed to happen; and very strangely have come to passe.And this hath bene a grounded reason for some men, to give as greatcredit to such things as they see sleeping, as they do to othersusually waking. So that, according unto their dreames, and as theymake construction of them, that are sadly distasted, or merrilypleased, even as (by them) they either feare or hope. On the contrary,there are some, who will not credit any dreame whatsoever, untill theybe falne into the very same danger which formerly they saw, and mostevidently in their sleepe.
2.  Having considered with her selfe, what course was best to beobserved in this case; uppon a day apt and convenient, she went to theConvent where he kept, and having caused him to be called, shee toldhim, that if his leysure so served, very gladly would she beconfessed, and onely had made her choice of him. The holy man seeingher to be a Gentlewoman (as indeed she was) willingly heard her; andwhen she had confessed what she could, she had yet another matter toacquaint him withall, and thereupon thus she began.
3.  The Mother unto this regardlesse daughter, having heard the angriewordes of her Husband, and how hee would be revenged on the faulty;could not endure that he should be so severe: wherefore, although sheewas likewise much afflicted in minde, and reputed her Daughterworthy (for so great an offence) of all cruell punnishment, yet shehasted to her displeased husband, and began to entreate, that heewould not runne on in such a furious spleene, now in his aged yeeresto be the murtherer of his owne childe, and soile his hands in theblood of his servant. Rather he might finde out some milde coursefor the satisfaction of his anger, by committing them to closeimprisonment, there to remaine and mourne for their folly committed.The vertuous and religious Lady alledged so many commendable examples,and used such plenty of moving perswasions, that she quite altredhis minde from putting them to death, and hee commanded onely, thatthey should separately be imprisoned, with little store of food, andlodging of the uneasiest, untill he should otherwise determine ofthem; and so it was done. What their life now was in captivity andcontinuall teares, with stricter abstinence then was needefull forthem, all this I must commit to your consideration. Jehannot and Spinaremaining in this comfortlesse condition, and an whole yeere being nowout-worne, yet Conrado keeping them thus still imprisoned: it cameto passe, that Don Pedro King of Arragon, by the meanes of Messer Johnde Procida, caused the Isle of Sicily to revolt, and tooke it awayfrom King Charles; whereat Conrado (he being of the Ghibbilinefaction) not a little rejoyced. Jehannot having intelligencethereof, by some of them that had him in custody, breathing foorth avehement sighe, spake in this manner. Alas poore miserable wretch as Iam! that have already gone begging thorough the world above foureteeneyeeres, in expectation of nothing else but this opportunity; and nowit is come, must I be in prison, to the end, that I should nevermore hope for any future happinesse? And how can I get forth of thisprison, except it bee by death onely? How now, replyed the Officerof the Guard? What doth this businesse of great Kings concerne thee?What affayres hast thou in Sicily?
4.  Beastly drunken Knave as thou art, this night thou shalt not comewithin these doores, I am no longer able to endure thy base behaviour,it is more then high time, that thy course of life should beepubliquely known, and at what drunken houres thou returnest home tothy house. Tofano, being a man of very impatient Nature, was as bitterunto her in words on the other which the Neighbours about them (bothmen and Women) hearing; looked forth of their Windowes, and demaundinga reason for this their disquietnesse, Cheta (seeming as if shewept) sayde.
5.  Signior Andrea, you are the most welcome friend to me in theworld; sealing this salutation with infinite sweet kisses andembraces: whereat (in wonderfull amazement) he being strangelytransported, replied; Madame, you honour me beyond all compasse ofmerit. Then, taking him by the hand, shee guided him thorough a goodlyHall, into her owne Chamber, which was delicately embalmed with Roses,Orenge flowers, and all other pleasing smelles, and a costly bed inthe middest, curtained round about, verie artificiall Picturesbeautifying the walles, with many other embellishments, such asthose Countries are liberally stored withall. He being meerely anovice in these kinds of wanton carriages of the World, and freefrom any base or degenerate conceite; firmely perswaded himselfe, that(questionlesse) she was a Lady of no meane esteeme, and he more thenhappy, to be thus respected and honored by her. They both being seatedon a curious Chest at the beds feete, teares cunningly trickling downeher Cheekes, and sighes intermedled with inward sobbings, breathedfoorth in sad, but verie seemely manner, thus shee beganne.
6.  Anastasio held out thus a long time, without lending an eare to suchfriendly counsell: but in the end, he was so neerely followed by them,as being no longer able to deny them, he promised to accomplishtheir request. Whereupon, making such extraordinary preparation, as ifhe were to set thence for France or Spaine, or else into somefurther distant countrey: he mounted on horsebacke, and accompaniedwith some few of his familiar friends, departed from Ravenna, and rodeto a countrey dwelling house of his owne, about three or foure milesdistant from the Cittie which was called Chiasso, and there (upon avery goodly greene) erecting divers Tents and Pavillions, such asgreat persons make use of in the time of a Progresse: he said to hisfriends, which came with him thither, that there he determined to makehis abiding, they all returning backe unto Ravenna, and might cometo visite him againe so often as they pleased.

推荐功能

1.  When the King heard this reply, he knew well enough the occasionof his Henne dinner, as also, what vertue lay couched under heranswere; perceiving apparantly, that wanton words would prove but invaine, and such a woman was not easily to be seduced; wherefore, ashee grew enamored on her inconsiderately, so he found it bestfitting for his honour, to quench this heate with wisedome discreetly.And so, without any more words, or further hope of speeding in sounkingly a purpose, dinner being ended, by a sudden departing, hesmoothly shadowed the cause of his comming, and thanking her for thehonour shee had done him, commended her to her chaste disposition, andposted away with speede to Gennes.
2.  Continuing still in feare of the losses he had sustained bytraffique, and minding never more to imploy his money that way, but tokeep this light vessell, which had holpen him to all his wealth: hecommanded his men to put forth their Oares, and shape,their course forhis owne dwelling. Being aloft in the higher Seas, darke nightover-taking them, and a mighty winde suddainly comming upon them: itnot onely was contrary to their course, but held on with suchimpetuous violence; that the small vessell, being unable to endure it,made to land-ward speedily, and in expectation of a more friendlywind, entred a little port of the Sea, directing up into a smallIsland, and there safely sheltred it selfe. Into the same port whichLandolpho had thus taken for his refuge, entred (soone after) twogreat Carrackes of Genewayes, lately come from Constantinople. Whenthe men in them had espied the small Barke, and lockt up her passagefrom getting forth; understanding the Owners name, and that report hadfamed him to be very rich, they determined (as men evermore addictednaturally, to covet after money and spoile) to make it their owne as aprize at Sea.
3.  Rob me of that, which mine owne soule commends.
4.  GREAT LORDS, ARE MANY TIMES RECOMPENCED, RATHER BY THEIR GOOD
5.   When Mithridanes had a while pondered on her speeches, hee waxedmuch discontented, as taking the words of the olde woman, to extollthe renowne of Nathan, and darken or ecclipse his glorie, whereupon hesaid to himselfe. Wretched man as I am, when shall I attaine to theheight of liberality, and performe such wonders, as Nathan doth? Inseeking to surmount him, I cannot come neere him in the verymeanest. Undoubtedly, I spend all my endeavour but in vaine, exceptI rid the world of him, which (seeing his age will not make an endof him) I must needs do with my own hands. In which furious and bloodydetermination (without revealing his intent to any one) he mountedon horse-backe, with few attendants in his company, and after threedayes journey, arrived where Nathan dwelt. He gave order to his men,to make no shew of beeing his servants, or any way to acknowledge him:but to provide them selves of convenient lodgings, untill they heardother tydings from him.
6.  When the Lady beheld the fruites and flowers, and heard many otherthinges recounted, so wonderfully growing in the same Garden: began torepent her rash promise made; yet notwithstanding her repentance, asWomen are covetous to see all rarities; so, accompanied with diversLadies and Gentlewomen more, she went to see the Garden; and havingcommended it with much admiration, she returned home againe, themost sorrowfull Woman as ever lived, considering what she had tyed herselfe to, for enjoying this Garden. So excessive grew her griefe andaffliction, that it could not be so clouded or concealed: but herHusband tooke notice of it, and would needs understand the occasionthereof. Long the Lady (in regard of shame and modesty) sate withoutreturning any answer; but being in the end constrained, she disclosdthe whol History to him.

应用

1.  When Calandrino was returned backe to his businesse, he could donothing else, but shake the head, sigh, puffe, and blowe, whichbeing observed by Bruno (who alwayes fitted him according to hisfolly, as making a meer mockery of his very best behaviour) sodainlyhe said. Why how now Calandrino? Sigh, puffe, and blow man? What maybe the reason of these unwonted qualities? Calandrino immediatelyanswered, saying: My friendly Companion Bruno, if I had one to lend mea little helpe, I should very quickely become well enough. How? quothBruno, doth any thing offend thee, and wilt thou not reveale it to thyfriend Deare Bruno, said Calandrino, there is a proper handsomewoman here in the house, the goodliest creature that ever any eyebeheld, much fairer then the Queen of Fairies her selfe, who is sodeeply falne in love with mee, as thou wouldst thinke it no lesse thena wonder; and yet I never sawe her before, till yer while when I wassent to fetch water. A very strange case, answered Bruno, take heedeCalandrino, that shee bee not the lovely friend to Phillippo, our yongMaster, for then it may prove a dangerous matter.
2.  Anastasio held out thus a long time, without lending an eare to suchfriendly counsell: but in the end, he was so neerely followed by them,as being no longer able to deny them, he promised to accomplishtheir request. Whereupon, making such extraordinary preparation, as ifhe were to set thence for France or Spaine, or else into somefurther distant countrey: he mounted on horsebacke, and accompaniedwith some few of his familiar friends, departed from Ravenna, and rodeto a countrey dwelling house of his owne, about three or foure milesdistant from the Cittie which was called Chiasso, and there (upon avery goodly greene) erecting divers Tents and Pavillions, such asgreat persons make use of in the time of a Progresse: he said to hisfriends, which came with him thither, that there he determined to makehis abiding, they all returning backe unto Ravenna, and might cometo visite him againe so often as they pleased.
3.  The Ladies and Gentlemen also, having smiled sufficiently at theseverall accidents which did befall the poore Traveller Andrea,reported at large by Madam Fiammetta, the Lady Aimillia seeing hertale to be fully concluded, began (by commandement of the Queene) tospeak in this manner.
4、  REPREHENDING THE LEWD LIVES OF DISSEMBLING HYPOCRITES; AND
5、  Madame, it can no way discontent mee (seeing it is your mostgracious pleasure) that I should have the honour, to breake thefirst staffe of freedome in this faire company (according to theinjunction of your Majesty) for liberty of our own best likingarguments: wherein I dismay not (if I can speake well enough) but toplease you all as well, as any other that is to follow me. Nor am I sooblivious (worthy Ladies) but full well I remember, that many timeshath bene related in our passed demonstrations, how mighty andvariable the powers of love are: and yet I cannot be perswaded, thatthey have all bene so sufficiently spoken of, but something may beefurther added, and the bottome of them never dived into, although weshould sit arguing a whole yeare together. And because it hath beenealreadie approved, that Lovers have bene led into divers accidents,not onely inevitable dangers of death, but also have entred into theverie houses of the dead, thence to convey their amorous friends: Ipurpose to acquaint you with a Novell, beside them which have benediscoursed; whereby you may not onely comprehend the power of Love,but also the wisedome used by an honest Gentlewoman, to rid herselfe of two importunate suiters, who loved her against her owneliking, yet neither of them knowing the others affection.

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网友评论(MpibElmE92247))

  • 力小五 08-04

      Sir, I have heard of a certaine man, named Primasso, one skilfullylearned in the Grammar, and (beyond all other) a very witty andready versifier: in regard whereof, he was so much admired, andfarre renowned, that such as never saw him, but onely heard of him,could easily say, this is Primasso. It came to passe, that beingonce at Paris, in poore estate, as commonly he could light on nobetter fortune (because vertue is slenderly rewarded, by such ashave the greatest possessions) he heard much fame of the Abbot ofClugni, a man reputed (next to the Pope) to be the richest Prelateof the Church. Of him he heard wonderfull and magnificent matters,that he alwayes kept an open and hospitable Court, and never maderefusall of any (from whence soever hee came or went) but they dideate and drinke freely there; provided, that they came when theAbbot was set at the Table. Primasso hearing this, and being anearnest desirer to see magnificent and vertuous men, hee resolved togoe see this rare bounty of the Abbot, demanding how far he dwelt fromParis? Being answered, about some three Leagues thence. Primassomade account, that if he went on betimes in the morning, he shouldeasily reach thither before the houre for dinner.

  • 秦玉龙 08-04

      But when I strove to get forth of the snare,

  • 曹裕江 08-04

       According as she was instructed by her Mistresse, she fell at thefeete of Master Doctor, desiring him to pardon a great error,whereby she had over-much offended him. As how? said Master Doctor. Inthis manner (quoth the Maide) and thus proceeded. You are not ignorantSir, what a lewde liver Ruggiero de Jeroly is, and notwithstanding allhis imperfections, how deerely I love him, as he protesteth the liketo me, and thus hath our love continued a yeere, and more. You beinggone to Malfy, and your absence granting me apt opportunity, forconference with so kinde a friend; I made the bolder, and gave himentrance into your house, yea even into mine owne Chamber, yet freefrom any abuse, neither did he (bad though he be) offer any. Thirstyhe was before his comming thither, either by salt meat, or distempereddiet, and I being unable to fetch him wine or water, by reason myMistresse sat in the Hall, seriously talking with her Sisters;remembred, that I saw a violl of Water standing in your ChamberWindow, which he drinking quite off, I set it empty in the placeagaine. I have heard your discontentment for the said Water, andconfesse my fault to you therein: but who liveth so justly, withoutoffending at one time or other? And I am heartily sory for mytransgression; yet not so much for the water, as the hard fortune thathath followed thereon; because thereby Ruggiero is in danger to losehis life, and all my hopes are utterly lost. Let me entreat youtherefore (gentle Master) first to pardon me, and then to grant mepermission, to succour my poore condemned friend, by all the bestmeanes I can devise.

  • 彭怀林 08-04

      You know the joyner before whose doore the Chest stoode, whereinwe did put Ruggiero; there is now a contention betweene him andanother man, to whom (it seemeth) the Chest doth belong; in regardwhereof, they are ready to quarrell extreamly each with other. For theone owing the Chest, and trusting the joyner to sell it for him, wouldhave him to pay him for the Chest. The joyner denieth any salethereof, avouching, that the last night it was stolne from hisdoore. Which the other man contrarying, maintaineth that he soldethe Chest to the two Lombard usurers, as himselfe is able toaffirme, because he found it in the house, when he (being present atthe apprehension of Ruggiero) sawe it there in the same house.Hereupon, the joyner gave him the lye, because he never sold it to anyman; but if it were there, they had robd him of it, as he would makeit manifest to their faces. Then falling into clamerous speechesthey went together to the Lombardes house, even as I returned home.Wherefore Mistresse, as you may easily perceive, Ruggiero was(questionlesse) carried thither in the Chest, and so there found;but how he revived againe, I cannot comprehend.

  • 蒋晨 08-03

    {  She, dissembling a farre fetcht sigh, thus answered. Reverend Sir, Iknow not what skilfull Art the Fryar useth, but this I am sure,every doore in our house will flye open to him, so soone as he dothbut touch it. Moreover, he told me, that when he commeth unto myChamber doore, he speaketh certaine words to himselfe, whichimmediately casteth my Husband into a dead sleepe, and,understanding him to bee thus sleepily entranced: he openeth thedoore, entreth in, lieth downe by me, and this every night hefaileth not to do. The jealous Coxcomb angerly scratching his head,and wishing his wife halfe hangd, said: Mistresse, this is verybadly done, for you should keepe your selfe from all men, but yourhusband onely. That shall I never doe, answered shee, because (indeed)I love him dearely. Why then (quoth our supposed Confessor) I cannotgive you any absolution. I am the more sory Sir, said she, I camenot hither to tell you any leasings, for if I could, yet I wouldnot, because it is not good to fable with such Saint-like men as youare. You do therein (quoth hee) the better, and surely I am verysory for you, because in this dangerous condition, it will bee theutter losse of your soule: neverthelesse, both for your husbandssake and your owne, I will take some paines, and use such especiallprayers in your name, which may (perchance) greatly avayle you. AndI purpose now and then, to send you a Novice or young Clearke of mine,whom you may safely acquaint with your minde, and signifie to me, byhim, whether they have done you good, or no: and if they provehelpefull, then will we further proceed therein. Alas Sir, said she,never trouble your selfe, in sending any body to our house; because,if my Husband should know it, he is so extreamly jealous, as all theworld cannot otherwise perswade him, but that he commeth thither forno honest intent, and so I shall live worse then now I do. Fear notthat, good woman, quoth he, but beleeve it certainly, that I will havesuch a care in this case, as your Husband shall never speake thereofto you. If you can doe so Sir, sayde she, proceed I pray you, and I amwell contented.

  • 简爱华 08-02

      The President being desirous to make the boy his, the Count (whosedayly prayers were to the same purpose) frankly gave his Son to theNobleman: albeit naturall and fatherly affection, urged someunwillingnesse to part so with him; yet necessity and discretion,found it best for the benefit of them both. Being thus eased of carefor his Son and Daughter, and they (though in different places) yetunder good and worthy government; the Count would continue no longerin England: but, as best hee could procure the meanes, passed overinto Ireland, and being arrived at a place called Stanford, becameservant to an Earle of that Country, a Gentleman professing Armes,on whom he attended as a serving man, and lived a long while in thatestate very painfully.}

  • 李向明 08-02

      It came to passe, and no long time since, that a young Florentine ofours, named Niccolo de Cignano, but more usually called Salabetto,imployed as Factor for his Maister, arrived at Palermo; his Shipstored with many Woollen Cloathes, a remainder of such as had bin soldat the Mart of Salerno; amounting in valew to above five hundredFlorines of Gold. When he had given in his packet to theCustome-house, and made them up safe in his Warehouse; withoutmaking shew of desiring any speedy dispatch, he delighted to viewall parts of the City, as mens minds are continuallie addicted toNovelties. He being a very faire and affable yong man, easie to kindleaffection in a very modest eie: it fortuned, that a Courtezane, one ofour before remembred shavers, who termed hir selfe Madame Biancafiore,having heard somewhat concerning his affairs, beganne to dartamorous glances at him. Which the indiscreete youth perceyving, andthinking her to be some great Lady: began also to grow halfeperswaded, that his comely person was pleasing to her and therefore hewould carrie this good fortune of his somewhat cautelously.

  • 穆罕默德·法耶兹 08-02

      During the time of this tragicall expectation, the fame of thispublike execution being noysed abroade, calling all people farre andneere to behold it; it came to the eare of Don Rogiero de Oria, aman of much admired valour, and then Lord high Admirall of Sicily, whocame himselfe in person, to the place appointed for their death.First, he observed the Mayden, confessing her (in his soule) to be abeauty beyond all compare. Then looking on the young man, thus hesaide within himselfe: If the inward endowments of the mind, doeparalell the outward perfections of body; the World cannot yeeld amore compleate man. Now, as good natures are quickly incited tocompassion (especially in cases almost commanding it) and compassionknocking at the doore of the soule, doth quicken the memory withmany passed recordations: so this noble Admirall, advisedly, beholdingpoore condemned Guion, conceived, that he had somewhat seene himbefore this instant, and upon this perswasion (even as if divinevertue had tutored his tongue) he saide: Is not thy name Guion diProcida?

  • 雷纳托·阿尔梅利尼 08-01

       Of famous, vertuous, and worthy men, it was continually her cheefestdelight to heare, and the admired actions of valiant Gerbino, reportedto her by many singular discoursers: such as could best describehim, with language answerable to his due deservings, won suchhonourable entertainment in her understanding soule, that they weremost affectionately pleasing to her, and in recapitulating (over andover againe) his manifold and heroycall perfections; meere speech madeher extreamely amorous of him, nor willingly would she lend an eare toany other discourse, but that which tended to his honour andadvancement.

  • 崔宁宁 07-30

    {  No soule so comfortlesse, etc.

  • 朱骄 07-30

      Eyes, can ye not refraine your hourely weeping?

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