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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:张国英 大小:CInTr0Ji58887KB 下载:93R57tuZ78875次
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日期:2020-08-11 18:48:07
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陈家堃

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  In those ancient and reverend dayes, wherof I am now to speake,the high renowne and admirable wisedome of Salomon, King of GreatBrittain, was most famous throughout all parts of the world; foranswering all doubtfull questions and demaunds whatsoever, thatpossibly could be propounded to him. So that many resorted to him,from the most remote and furthest off countreyes, to heare hismiraculous knowledge and experience, yea, and to crave his counsell,in matters of greatest importance. Among the rest of them whichrepaired thither, was a rich yong Gentleman, honourably descended,named Melisso, who came from the City of Laiazzo, where he was bothborne, and dwelt.
2.  At the appointed time, when the woman came to confession to theAbbot, and was on her knees before him, to his no small contentment,before she would say any thing else, thus she began: Sacred Father, ifGod had not given me such an husband as I have, or else had bestowedon me none at all; I might have beene so happy, by the meanes ofyour holy doctrine, very easily to have entred into the way, whereofyou spake the other day, which leadeth to eternall life. But when Iconsider with my selfe, what manner of man Ferando is, and thinke uponhis folly withall; I may well terme my selfe to be a widow, although Iam a maried wife, because while he liveth, I cannot have any otherhusband. And yet (as sottish as you see him) he is (without anyoccasion given him) so extreamely jealous of me; as I am not able tolive with him, but only in continuall tribulation and hearts griefe.In which respect, before I enter into confession, I most humblybeseech you, that you would vouchsafe (in this distresse) to assist mewith your fatherly advice and counsell, because, if thereby I cannotattaine to a more pleasing kinde of happinesse; neither confessior, orany thing else, is able to doe me any good at all.
3.  WHEREIN IS DECLARED, THE FIRME LOYALTIE OF A TRUE LOVER: AND HOW
4.  Who this night keepes me companie.
5.  But why do I trouble you with the repetition of so many countries? Icoasted on still, after I had past Saint Georges Arme, into Truffia,and then into Buffia which are Countries much inhabited, and withgreat people. From thence I went into the Land of Lying, where I foundstore of the Brethren of our Religion, and many other beside, whoshunned all paine and labour, onely for the love of God, and caredas little, for the paines and travailes which others tooke, exceptsome benefit arised thereby to them; nor spend they any money inthis Country, but such as is without stampe. Thence I went into theLand of Abruzzi, where the men and women goe in Galoches over theMountaines, and make them garments of their Swines guts. Not farrefrom thence, I found people, that carried bread in their staves, andwine in Satchels, when parting from them, I arrived among theMountaines of Bacchus, where all the waters run downe with a deepefall, and in short time, I went on so far, that I found my selfe to bein India Pastinaca; where I swear to you by the holy habit which Iweare on my body, that I saw Serpents Bye, things incredible, and suchas were never seene before.But because I would be loth to lye, so soone as I departed thence,I met with Maso de Saggio, who was a great Merchant there, and whomI found cracking Nuts, and selling Cockles by retale. Neverthelesse,al this while I could not finde what I sought for, and therefore I wasto passe from hence by water, if I intended to travaile thither, andso into the Holy Land, where coole fresh bread is sold for fourepence, and the hot is given away for nothing. There I found thevenerable Father (blame me not I beseech you) the most woorthiePatriarch of Jerusalem, who for the reverence due to the habite Iweare, and love to our Lord Baron Saint Anthony, would have me tosee al the holy Reliques, which he had there under his charge:wherof there were so many, as if I should recount them all to you, Inever could come to a conclusion. But yet not to leave youdiscomforted, I will relate some few of them to you. First of all,he shewed me the finger of the holy Ghost, so whole and perfect, asever it was. Next, the nose of the Cherubin, which appeared to SaintFrances; with the payring of the naile of a Seraphin; and one of theribbes of Verbum caro, fastened to one of the Windowes' covered withthe holy garments of the Catholique Faith. Then he tooke me into adarke Chappel, where he shewed me divers beames of the Starre thatappeared to the three Kings in the East. Also a Violl of SaintMichaels sweate, when he combatted with the divell: And the jaw-boneof dead Lazarus, with many other precious things beside. And because Iwas liberall to him, giving him two of the Plaines of Monte Morello,in the Vulgare Edition, and some of the Chapters del Caprezio, whichhe had long laboured in search of; he bestowed on me some of hisReliques. First, he gave me one of the eye-teeth of Santa Crux; anda litle Violl, filled with some part of the sound of those Belles,which hung in the sumptuous Temple of Salomon. Next, he gave mee theFeather of the Phoenix, which was with Noah in the Arke, as before Itold you. And one of the Woodden Pattens, which the good Saint Gerrardde Magnavilla used to weare in his travailes, and which I gave (notlong since) to Gerrardo di Bousy at Florence, where it is respectedwith much devotion. Moreover, he gave me a few of those Coales,wherwith the Phoenix of Noah was roasted; all which things I broughtaway thence with me. Now, most true it is, that my Superiour wouldnever suffer mee to shew them any where, untill he was faithfullycertified, whether they were the same precious Reliques, or no. Butperceyving by sundrie Myracles which they have wrought, and Letters ofsufficient credence receyved from the reverend Patriarch, that allis true, he hath graunted me permission to them, and because I woldnot trust any one with matters of such moment, I my selfe brought themhither with me. Now I must tell you, that the Feather of the samePhoenix, I conveyed into a small Cabinet or Casket, because itshould not be bent or broken. And the Coales wherewith the saidPhoenix was roasted, I put into another Casket, in all respects solike to the former, that many times I have taken one for another. Asnow at this instant it hath bin my fortune: for, imagining that Ibrought the Casket with the feather, I mistooke my self, and broughtthe other with the coales. Wherein doubtles I have not offended,because I am certaine, that we of our Order do not any thing, but itis ordred by divine direction, and our blessed Patron the LordeBaron Saint Anthony. And so much the rather, because about a senighthence, the Feast of Saint Anthony is to bee solemnized, against thepreparation whereof, and to kindle your zeale with the greaterfervencie: he put the Casket with the Coales into my hand, meaning,let you see the Feather, at some more fitting season. And therefore myblessed Sonnes and Daughters, put off your Bonnets, and come hitherwith devotion to looke upon them. But first let me tell you, whosoeveris marked by any of these Coales, with the signe of the Crosse: heor she shal live all this yeare happily, and no fire whatsoevershall come neere to touch or hurt them. So, singing a solemneAntheme in the praise of S. Anthony, he unveyled the Casket, andshewed the Coales openly.The simple multitude, having (with great admiration and reverence)a long while beheld them, they thronged in crouds to Fryar Onyon,giving him farre greater offerings, then before they had, andentreating him to marke them each after other. Whereupon, he takingthe coales in his hand, began to marke their garments of white, andthe veyles on the Womens heads, with Crosses of no meane extendure:affirming to them, that the more the Coales wasted with making thosegreat crosses, the more they still encreased in the Casket, as oftenbefore hee had made triall.
6.  Shall I tearme her a woman, or rather some savage monster in awomans shape? Hath shee not made an open prostitution of herhonesty, broken her plighted faith to her Husband, and all the womanlyreputation shee had in this World? Her Husband, being an honourableCitizen, entreating her alwayes, as few men else in the City doe theirwives; what an heart-breake must this needes bee to him, good man?Neither I, nor any honest man else, ought to have any pity on her, but(with our owne hands) teare her in peeces, or dragge her along to agood fire in the Market place, wherein she and her minion should beconsumed together, and their base ashes dispersed abroad in the winde,least the pure Aire should be infected with them.

计划指导

1.  This Master Chappelet, was of so good and commendable life; that,being a Notarie, he held it in high disdaine, that any of hisContractes (although he made but few) should be found withoutfalshoode. And looke how many soever hee dealt withall, he would beurged and required thereto, offering them his paines and travailefor nothing, but to bee requited otherwise then by money; whichprooved to bee his much larger recompencing, and returned to him thefarre greater benefit. Hee tooke the onely pleasure of the world, tobeare false witnesse, if hee were thereto entreated, and(oftentimes) when hee was not requested at all. Likewise because inthose times, great trust and beleefe was given to an oath, he makingno care or conscience to be perjured: greatly advantaged himselfe byLaw suites, in regard that many matters relyed upon his oath, anddelivering the truth according to his knowledge.
2.  Since the first houre that love enthralled me,
3.  This then is the great evill, the great offence, and the greatinjurie committed by my friend Gisippus, and by mee as a Lover: thatSophronia is secretly become the wife of Titus Quintus Fulvius. Andfor this cause, like spies you watch him, threaten him daily, as ifyou intended to teare him in pieces. What could you doe more, if heehad given her to a man of the very vilest condition? to a villaine, toa slave? What prisons? what fetters? Or what torments are sufficientfor this fact? But leaving these frivolous matters, let us come todiscourse of more moment, and better beseeming your attention.
4.  When the Ladies heard this, they made answer, that all should beeanswerable to his minde. Whereupon, the King gave them all leave todispose of themselves till supper time. And because the Sun was yetvery high, in regard all the re-counted Novels had bin so short:Dioneus went to play at the Tables with another of the yong Gentlemen,and Madame Eliza, having withdrawne the Ladies aside, thus spakeunto them. During the time of our being heere, I have often benedesirous to let you see a place somwhat neere at hand, and which Isuppose you have never seene, it being called The Valley of Ladies.Till now, I could not finde any convenient time to bring youthither, the Sunne continuing still aloft, which fitteth you withthe apter leysure, and the sight (I am sure) can no way discontentyou.
5.  BEING INJURIED AND OFFENDED BY THEM THAT THEY LOVE
6.  When first I saw her, that now makes me sigh,

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1.  Afterward, he demanded of him, how much displeasing to God hee hadbeene in the sinne of Gluttony? When (sighing againe greatly) heeanswered: Too much, and too often, good Father. For, over and besidethe Fasts of our Lent season, which everie yeare ought to bee duelyobserved by devout people, I brought my selfe to such a customarieuse, that I could fast three dayes in every Weeke, with Bread andWater. But indeede (holy Father) I confesse, that I have drunkewater with such a pleasing appetite and delight (especially inpraying, or walking on pilgrimages) even as greedy drunkards doe, indrinking good Wine. And many times I have desired such Sallades ofsmall hearbes, as Women do gather abroad in the open fields, andfeeding onely upon them, without coveting after any other kinde ofsustenance, hath seemed much more pleasing to me, then I thought toagree with the nature of Fasting, especially, when as it swervethfrom devotion, or is not done as it ought to bee.Sonne, Sonne, replied the Confessour, these sinnes are naturall,and very light, and therefore I would not have thee to charge thyconscience with them, more then is needfull. It happeneth to every man(how holy soever he be) that after he hath fasted overlong, feedingwill be welcome to him, and drinking good drinke after his travaile. OSir, (said Maister Chappelet) never tell me this to comfort me, forwell you know, and I am not ignorant therein, that such things asare done for the service of God, ought all to be performed purely, andwithout any blemish of the minde; what otherwise is done, savoureth ofsinne. The Friar being well contented with his words, said: It isnot amisse that thou understandest it in this manner, and thyconscience thus purely cleared, is no little comfort to me. But tellme now concerning Avarice, hast thou sinned therein, by desiringmore then was reasonable, or withholding from others, such things asthou oughtst not to detaine? Wherein Maister Chappelet answered.Good Father, I would not have you to imagine, because you see melodged heere in the house of two Usurers, that therefore I am of anysuch disposition. No truely Sir, I came hither to no other end, butonely to chastise and admonish them in friendly manner, to clensetheir mindes from such abhominable profit: And assuredly, I shouldhave prevailed therein, had not this violent sicknesse hindered mineintention. But understand (holy Father) that my parents left me a richman, and immediatly after my Fathers death, the greater part of hisgoods I gave away for Gods sake, and then, to sustaine mine owne life,and to helpe the poore members of Jesus Christ, I betooke my selfeto a meane estate of Merchandise, desiring none other then honestgaine thereby, and evermore whatsoever benefit came to me; Iimparted halfe thereof to the poore, converting mine owne smallportion about my necessary affaires, which that other part wouldscarcely serve to supply: yet alwayes God gave thereto such amercifull blessing, that my businesse dayly thrived more and more,arising still from good to better.
2.  After great consultation with Kindred and Friends, the match wasagreed upon, to the no little joy of Gianetta, who devoutly returnedinfinite thankes to heaven, for so mercifully respecting herdejected poore estate, after the bitter passage of so many miseries,and never tearming her selfe any otherwise, but the daughter of apoore Piccard. Soone was the yong Gentleman recovered and married,no man alive so well contented as he, and setting downe an absolutedetermination, to lead a loving life with his Gianetta.
3.  About a yeare already past since, there dwelt at Barletta, an honestman, called John de Barolo, who because he was of poore condition; formaintenance in his contented estate, provided himselfe of a Mule, tocarry commodities from place to place, where Faires and Markets werein request, but most especially to Apuglia, buying and selling inthe nature of a petty Chapman. Travelling thus thorow theCountreyes, he grew into great and familiar acquaintance, with one whonamed himselfe Pietro da Tresanti, following the same Trade of life ashe did, carrying his commodities upon an Asse. In signe of amitie,according to the Countreyes custome, he never tearmed him otherwisethen by the name of Gossip Pietro and alwayes when he came toBarletta, he brought him to his own house, taking it as his Inne,entreating him very friendly, and in the best manner he could deviseto doe. On the other side, Gossip Pietro being very poore, havingbut one simple habitation in the village of Tresanti, hardly sufecientfor him, and an handsome young woman which he had to his wife, as alsohis Asse: evermore when John de Barolo came to Tresanti, he wouldbring him to his poore abiding, with all his uttermost abilitie ofentertainement, in due acknowledgement of the courtesie he afforded tohim at Barletta. But when he came to take repose in the nightseason, Gossip Pietro could not lodge him as gladly he would:because he had but one silly bed, wherein himselfe and his wife lay;so that John de Barolo was faigne to lie on a little straw, in a smallstable, close adjoyning by his owne Mule and the Asse.
4.  THE FIRST DAY, THE SIXT NOVELL
5.   Neverthelesse, at length, he matched her with the Sonne to theDuke of Capua, who lived no long while with her; but left her in awiddowed estate, and then she returned home to her father againe.
6.  The Lord Abbot wondred not a little, that a robber on the highwayes, should have such a bold and liberall spirit, which appearedvery pleasing to him; and instantly, his former hatred and spleeneagainst Ghinotto, became converted into cordiall love and kindnes,so that (imbracing him in his armes) he said. I protest upon my vowmade to Religion, that to win the love of such a man, as I plainelyperceive thee to be: I would undergo far greater injuries, thenthose which I have received at thy hands. Accursed be cruelldestiny, that forced thee to so base a kind of life, and did notblesse thee with a fairer fortune. After he had thus spoken, he leftthere the greater part of all his goods, and returned backe againeto Rome, with few horses, and a meaner traine.

应用

1.  All this being done, variety of pleasing Wines were brought,Banquetting stuffe, and other dainties; after which they fell toDauncing. And Pamphilus, having receyved command to begin anespecial dance, the King turned himselfe unto Madame Eliza, speakingthus. Faire Lady, you have done me so much honour this day, as todeliver mee the Crowne: in regard whereof, be you this night theMistresse of the song: and let it be such as best may please yourselfe. Whereunto Madam Eliza, with a modest blush arising in her face,replyed; That his will should be fulfilled, and then (with adeficate voyce) she beganne in this manner.
2.  FRIARS, AND PRIESTS MAY BE NONE OF THEIR GOSSIPS, IN
3.  No sooner was this hurly burly somewhat calmed, but the Serjeants tothe Captine of the City, came thither, and apprehended divers of themutiners: among whom were Menghino, Giovanni, and Grinello, committingthem immediately to prison. But after every thing was pacified, andJacomino returned home to his house from supper; he was not a littleoffended at so grosse an injury. When he was fully informed, how thematter happened, and apparantly perceived, that no blame at allcould be imposed on the Mayden: he grew the better contented,resolving with himselfe (because no more such inconveniences shouldhappen) to have her married so soone as possibly he could.
4、  Soone after, it being plainely discerned on either side, that theone was as well contented with these walkes, as the other could be:she desired to enflame him a little further, by a more liberallillustration of her affection towards him, when time and placeaffoorded convenient opportunity. To the holy Father againe shewent, (for she had beene too long from shrift) and kneeling downe athis feete, intended to begin her confession in teares; which the Friarperceiving, sorrowfully demanded of her; what accident had happened?Holy Father (quoth shee) no novell accident, only your wicked andungracious friend, by whom (since I was heere with you, yea, no longeragoe then yesterday) I have been so wronged, as I verily beleevethat he was borne to bee my mortall enemy, and to make me dosomthing to my utter disgrace for ever; and whereby I shall not dareto be seene any more of you my deare Father. How is this? answered theFriar, hath he not refrained from afflicting you so abusively?
5、  Continuing still in feare of the losses he had sustained bytraffique, and minding never more to imploy his money that way, but tokeep this light vessell, which had holpen him to all his wealth: hecommanded his men to put forth their Oares, and shape,their course forhis owne dwelling. Being aloft in the higher Seas, darke nightover-taking them, and a mighty winde suddainly comming upon them: itnot onely was contrary to their course, but held on with suchimpetuous violence; that the small vessell, being unable to endure it,made to land-ward speedily, and in expectation of a more friendlywind, entred a little port of the Sea, directing up into a smallIsland, and there safely sheltred it selfe. Into the same port whichLandolpho had thus taken for his refuge, entred (soone after) twogreat Carrackes of Genewayes, lately come from Constantinople. Whenthe men in them had espied the small Barke, and lockt up her passagefrom getting forth; understanding the Owners name, and that report hadfamed him to be very rich, they determined (as men evermore addictednaturally, to covet after money and spoile) to make it their owne as aprize at Sea.

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  • 朴哲 08-10

      The Abbot riding on, with newer crotchets in his braine then hehad before the sight of Alessandro, it fortuned, that after diversdayes of travaile, they came to a small Country Village, whichaffoorded little store of Lodging, and yet the Abbot would needeslye there. Alessandro, being well acquainted with the Hoste of thehouse, willed him to provide for the Abbot and his people, and then tolodge him where hee thought it meetest. Now before the Abbotscomming thither, the Harbenger that marshalled all such matters, hadprovided for his Traine in the Village, some in one place, andothers elsewhere, in the best maner that the Towne could yeelde. Butwhen the Abbot had supt, a great part of the night being spent, andevery one else at his rest; Alessandro demaunded of the Hoste, whatprovision he had made for him, and how hee should be lodged thatnight?

  • 赵瑞泰 08-10

      The precious Stones and jewels found by Landolpho, maketh mee toremember (said Madam Fiammetta, who was next to deliver her discourse)a Tale, containing no lesse perils, then that reported by MadamLauretta: but somewhat different from it, because the one happenedin sundry yeeres, and this other had no longer time, then the compasseof one poore night, as instantly I will relate unto you.

  • 赵弘 08-10

       Much merriment was among the Ladies, hearing this Tale ofMartellinos misfortunes, so familiarly reported by Madam Neiphila, andof the men, it was best respected by Philostratus, who sitting neerestunto Neiphila, the Queene commanded his Tale to be the next, whenpresently he began to speake thus.

  • 张超晖 08-10

      Piero, my Father and thine, dwelt long time (as thou canst notchoose but to have understood) in Palermo; where, through thebounty, and other gracious good parts remaining in him, he was muchrenowned, and to this day, is no doubt remembred, by many of hisloving Friends and Wellwillers. Among them that most intimatelyaffected Piero, my mother (who was Gentlewoman, and at that time awidow) did deerest of all other love him; so that: forgetting thefeare of her Father, Brethren, yea, and her owne honour, they becameso privately acquainted, that I was begotten, and am heere now such asthou seest me. Afterward, occasions so befalling our Father, toabandon Palermo, and returne to Perouse, he left my mother and mehis little daughter, never after (for ought that I could learne)once remembring either her or me: so that (if he had not beene myFather) I could have much condemned him, in regard of hisingratitude to my mother, and love which hee ought to have shewne meas his childe, being borne of no Chamber-maide, neyther of a Cittysinner; albeit I must needes say, that she was blame-worthy, withoutany further knowledge of him (rioved onely thereto by most loyalaffection) to commit both her selfe, and all the wealth shee had, intohis hands: but things ill done, and so long time since, are moreeasily controulled, then amended.Being left so young at Palermo, and growing (well neere) to thestature as now you see me; my Mother (being wealthy) gave me inmarriage to one of the Gergentes Family, a Gentleman, and of greatrevennues, who in his love to me and my mother, went and dwelt atPalermo: where falling into the Guelphes Faction, and making one inthe enterprize with Charles our King; it came to passe, that they werediscovered to Fredericke King of Arragon, before their intent could beput in execution: Whereupon, we were enforced to flye from Sicily,even when my hope stoode fairely, to have beene the greatest Lady inall the Island. Packing up then such few things as wee could take withus, (few I may well call them, in regard of our wealthy possessions,both in Pallaces, Houses, and Lands, all which we were constrainedto forgo:) we made our recourse to this Citty, where we found KingCharles so benigne and gracious to us, that recompencing the greaterpart of our losses, he bestowed Lands and houses on us here, besidea continuall large pension to my husband your brother in Law, asheereafter himselfe shall better acquaint you withal. Thus came Ihither, and thus remaine here, where I am able to welcome my brotherAndrea, thankes more to Fortune, then any friendlinesse in him. Withwhich words she embraced and kissed him many times, sighing andweeping as she did before.Andrea hearing this Fable so artificially delivered, composed frompoint to point with such likely protestations, without faltring orfailing in any one words utterance; and remembring perfectly fortruth, that his Father had formerly dwelt at Palermo; knowing also (bysome sensible feeling in himselfe) the custome of young people, whoare easily conquered by affection in their youthfull heate, seeingbeside the tears, trembling speeches, and earnest embracings of thiscunning commodity; he tooke all to be true by her thus spoken, andupon her silence, thus replyed. Lady, let it not seeme strange to you,that your words have raysed marvell in me, because (indeed) I had noknowledge of you, even no more then as if I had never seene you: neveralso having heard my father speak either of you or your mother (forsome considerations best known unto himselfe:) or if at any time heused such language, either my youth then, or defective memory since,hath utterly lost it. But truely, it is no little joy and comfort tome, to finde a sister here, where I had no such hope or expectation,and where also myselfe am a meere stranger. For to speake my mindefreely of you, and the perfections gracefully appearing in you Iknow not any man of how great repute or qualitie soever, but you maywell beseeme his acceptance, much rather then mine, that am but a meanMerchant. But faire Sister, I desire to be resolved in one thing, towit; by what means you had understanding of my being in this City?whereto readily she returned him this answer.

  • 方丽槐 08-09

    {  Beleeve me Buffalmaco, saide the Doctor, Bruno hath spoken nothingbut truth, for I am scarsely knowne heere in this City, where (for themost part) they are all grosse-witted people, rather then any jotjudicious: but I would thou hadst seene me among the Doctors, inmanner as I was wont to be. In troth Sir, replyed Buffalmaco, youare much more Learned then ever I imagined, in which respect, speakunto you as it becommeth me, to a man so excellent in wit andunderstanding: I dare assure you, that (without any faile) I witprocure you to be one of our Company.

  • 邹蕴玉 08-08

      After the promise was thus faithfully made, and they still keepingcompany, as they were wont to doe: It fortuned, that Tingocciobecame Gossip to one, named Ambrosio Anselmino, dwelling inCamporegglo, who by his wife, called Monna Mita, had a sweet andlovely Sonne. Tingoccio often resorting thither, and consorted withhis companion Meucio; the she-Gossip, being a woman worthy the loving,faire and comely of her person. Tingoccio, notwithstanding theGossipship betweene them, had more then a moneths minde to hisGodchilds Mother. Meucio also fell sicke of the same disease,because shee seemed Fleasing in his eye, and Tingoccio gave he nomeane commendations; yet, carefully hey concealed their love tothemselves, but not for one and the same occasion. Because Tingocciokept it closely from Meucio, lest he should hold it disgracefull inhim, to beare amourous affection to his Gossip, and thought itunfitting to bee knowne. But Meucio had no such meaning, for heeknew well enough that Tingoccio loved her, and therefore conceivedin his minde, that if he discovered any such matter to him: He will(quoth he) be jealous of me, and being her Gossip (which admitteth hisconference with her when himselfe pleaseth;) he may easily make her todistaste me, and therefore I must rest contented as I am.}

  • 吴静霞 08-08

      THE FIFT DAY, THE SECOND NOVELL

  • 崔婧娥 08-08

      Not long had he taried there, but two Women slaves came laden tohim, the one bearing a Mattresse of fine Fustian on hir head, andthe other a great Basket filled with many things. Having spred theMattresse in a faire Chamber on a Couch-bed, they covered it withdelicate white Linnen sheets, all about embroidred with faireFringes of gold, then laid they on costly quilts of rich Silkes,artificially wrought with gold and silver knots, having pearles andprecious stones interwoven among them, and two such rich pillowes,as sildome before had the like bin seene. Salabetto putting off hisgarments, entred the Bath prepared for him, where the two Slaveswashed his body very neatly. Soone after came Biancafiore hirselfe,attended on by two other women slaves, and seeing Salabetto in theBathe; making him a lowly reverence, breathing forth infinitedissembled sighes, and teares trickling downe her cheekes, kissing andembracing him, thus she spake.

  • 顾雪松 08-07

       This Gentlewoman, being yet in the flourishing condition of hertime, did ordinarily resort to the Cathedrall Church in holie zeale,and religious devotion; where the Provost of the place, became soenamored of her, as nothing (but the sight of her) yeelded him anycontentment. Which fond affection of his, was forwarded with such anaudacious and bold carriage, as hee dared to acquaint her with hislove, requiring her enterchange of affection, and the like opinionof him, as he had of her. True it is, that he was very farre entredinto yeares, but yong and lustie in his own proud conceite,presuming strangely beyond his capacity, and thinking as well of hisabilitie, as the youthfullest gallant in the World could doe.Whereas (in verie deede) his person was utterly displeasing, hisbehaviour immodest and scandaious, and his usuall Language,savouring of such sensualitie, as, very fewe or none cared for hiscompany. And if any Woman seemed respective of him, it was in regardof his outside and profession, and more for feare, then the leastaffection, and alwayes as welcome to them, as the head-ake.

  • 韦伟 08-05

    {  And I sought refuge, but it was too late.

  • 杨洁 08-05

      When they had rested themselves there for some few dayes, thesupposed Abbot, with the two Knights, and none else in company butAlessandro, went before the Pope, and having done him such reverenceas beseemed, the Abbot began to speake in this manner.

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