0 大卫澳门平台网站-APP安装下载

大卫澳门平台网站 注册最新版下载

大卫澳门平台网站 注册

大卫澳门平台网站注册

类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:叶舟 大小:0i2W4q2172358KB 下载:MWYWpqaR23166次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:ABS5LRFJ44993条
日期:2020-08-10 01:24:11
安卓
罗恩·谢波德

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "Do we know, Menelaus," said she, "the names of these strangerswho have come to visit us? Shall I guess right or wrong?-but Icannot help saying what I think. Never yet have I seen either man orwoman so like somebody else (indeed when I look at him I hardly knowwhat to think) as this young man is like Telemachus, whom Ulysses leftas a baby behind him, when you Achaeans went to Troy with battle inyour hearts, on account of my most shameless self."
2.  Thus spoke the stockman, and Ulysses struck the son of Damastor witha spear in close fight, while Telemachus hit Leocritus son of Evenorin the belly, and the dart went clean through him, so that he fellforward full on his face upon the ground. Then Minerva from her seaton the rafter held up her deadly aegis, and the hearts of thesuitors quailed. They fled to the other end of the court like a herdof cattle maddened by the gadfly in early summer when the days areat their longest. As eagle-beaked, crook-taloned vultures from themountains swoop down on the smaller birds that cower in flocks uponthe ground, and kill them, for they cannot either fight or fly, andlookers on enjoy the sport- even so did Ulysses and his men fallupon the suitors and smite them on every side. They made a horriblegroaning as their brains were being battered in, and the groundseethed with their blood.
3.  "To this he gave me but a pitiless answer, 'Stranger,' said he, 'youare a fool, or else you know nothing of this country. Talk to me,indeed, about fearing the gods or shunning their anger? We Cyclopes donot care about Jove or any of your blessed gods, for we are ever somuch stronger than they. I shall not spare either yourself or yourcompanions out of any regard for Jove, unless I am in the humour fordoing so. And now tell me where you made your ship fast when youcame on shore. Was it round the point, or is she lying straight offthe land?'
4.  "Telemachus," said one youngster, "means to be the death of us; Isuppose he thinks he can bring friends to help him from Pylos, oragain from Sparta, where he seems bent on going. Or will he go toEphyra as well, for poison to put in our wine and kill us?"
5.  Penelope was moved still more deeply as she heard the indisputableproofs that Ulysses laid before her; and when she had again foundrelief in tears she said to him, "Stranger, I was already disposedto pity you, but henceforth you shall be honoured and made welcomein my house. It was I who gave Ulysses the clothes you speak of. Itook them out of the store room and folded them up myself, and Igave him also the gold brooch to wear as an ornament. Alas! I shallnever welcome him home again. It was by an ill fate that he ever setout for that detested city whose very name I cannot bring myselfeven to mention."
6.  "At first she would have nothing to do with his wicked scheme, forshe was of a good natural disposition; moreover there was a bardwith her, to whom Agamemnon had given strict orders on setting out forTroy, that he was to keep guard over his wife; but when heaven hadcounselled her destruction, Aegisthus thus this bard off to a desertisland and left him there for crows and seagulls to batten upon- afterwhich she went willingly enough to the house of Aegisthus. Then heoffered many burnt sacrifices to the gods, and decorated manytemples with tapestries and gilding, for he had succeeded far beyondhis expectations.

计划指导

1.  "My friend," answered Nestor, "you recall a time of much sorrow tomy mind, for the brave Achaeans suffered much both at sea, whileprivateering under Achilles, and when fighting before the great cityof king Priam. Our best men all of them fell there- Ajax, Achilles,Patroclus peer of gods in counsel, and my own dear son Antilochus, aman singularly fleet of foot and in fight valiant. But we sufferedmuch more than this; what mortal tongue indeed could tell the wholestory? Though you were to stay here and question me for five years, oreven six, I could not tell you all that the Achaeans suffered, and youwould turn homeward weary of my tale before it ended. Nine longyears did we try every kind of stratagem, but the hand of heaven wasagainst us; during all this time there was no one who could comparewith your father in subtlety- if indeed you are his son- I canhardly believe my eyes- and you talk just like him too- no one wouldsay that people of such different ages could speak so much alike. Heand I never had any kind of difference from first to last neither incamp nor council, but in singleness of heart and purpose we advisedthe Argives how all might be ordered for the best.
2.  Now when Penelope heard that the beggar had been struck in thebanqueting-cloister, she said before her maids, "Would that Apollowould so strike you, Antinous," and her waiting woman Eurynomeanswered, "If our prayers were answered not one of the suitors wouldever again see the sun rise." Then Penelope said, "Nurse, I hate everysingle one of them, for they mean nothing but mischief, but I hateAntinous like the darkness of death itself. A poor unfortunate tramphas come begging about the house for sheer want. Every one else hasgiven him something to put in his wallet, but Antinous has hit himon the right shoulder-blade with a footstool."
3.  Alcinous then led the way, and the others followed after, while aservant went to fetch Demodocus. The fifty-two picked oarsmen wentto the sea shore as they had been told, and when they got there theydrew the ship into the water, got her mast and sails inside her, boundthe oars to the thole-pins with twisted thongs of leather, all indue course, and spread the white sails aloft. They moored the vessel alittle way out from land, and then came on shore and went to the houseof King Alcinous. The outhouses, yards, and all the precincts werefilled with crowds of men in great multitudes both old and young;and Alcinous killed them a dozen sheep, eight full grown pigs, and twooxen. These they skinned and dressed so as to provide a magnificentbanquet.
4.  Thus did they converse, and meanwhile the ship which had broughtTelemachus and his crew from Pylos had reached the town of Ithaca.When they had come inside the harbour they drew the ship on to theland; their servants came and took their armour from them, and theyleft all the presents at the house of Clytius. Then they sent aservant to tell Penelope that Telemachus had gone into the country,but had sent the ship to the town to prevent her from being alarmedand made unhappy. This servant and Eumaeus happened to meet whenthey were both on the same errand of going to tell Penelope. When theyreached the House, the servant stood up and said to the queen in thepresence of the waiting women, "Your son, Madam, is now returnedfrom Pylos"; but Eumaeus went close up to Penelope, and said privatelythat her son had given bidden him tell her. When he had given hismessage he left the house with its outbuildings and went back to hispigs again.
5.  As he spoke he lashed his horses and they started off at fullspeed through the town towards the open country. They swayed theyoke upon their necks and travelled the whole day long till the sunset and darkness was over all the land. Then they reached Pherae,where Diocles lived who was son of Ortilochus, the son of Alpheus.There they passed the night and were treated hospitably. When thechild of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, they again yoked theirhorses and their places in the chariot. They drove out through theinner gateway and under the echoing gatehouse of the outer court. ThenPisistratus lashed his horses on and they flew forward nothingloath; ere long they came to Pylos, and then Telemachus said:
6.  "What an exquisitely delicious sleep I have been having," saidshe, as she passed her hands over her face, "in spite of all mymisery. I wish Diana would let me die so sweetly now at this verymoment, that I might no longer waste in despair for the loss of mydear husband, who possessed every kind of good quality and was themost distinguished man among the Achaeans."

推荐功能

1.  Telemachus heard him, and at once went up to his father. "Hold!"he cried, "the man is guiltless, do him no hurt; and we will Medontoo, who was always good to me when I was a boy, unless Philoetiusor Eumaeus has already killed him, or he has fallen in your way whenyou were raging about the court."
2.  "They all swore as she told them, and when they had completedtheir oath the woman said, 'Hush; and if any of your men meets me inthe street or at the well, do not let him speak to me, for fear someone should go and tell my master, in which case he would suspectsomething. He would put me in prison, and would have all of youmurdered; keep your own counsel therefore; buy your merchandise asfast as you can, and send me word when you have done loading. I willbring as much gold as I can lay my hands on, and there is somethingelse also that I can do towards paying my fare. I am nurse to theson of the good man of the house, a funny little fellow just able torun about. I will carry him off in your ship, and you will get a greatdeal of money for him if you take him and sell him in foreign parts.'
3.  "When I heard him I was in two minds whether or no to draw thekeen blade that hung by my sturdy thigh and cut his head off inspite of his being a near relation of my own; but the men intercededfor him and said, 'Sir, if it may so be, let this fellow stay here andmind the ship, but take the rest of us with you to Circe's house.'
4.  They put on their armour as fast as they could- that is to sayUlysses, his three men, and the six sons of Dolius. Laertes also andDolius did the same- warriors by necessity in spite of their greyhair. When they had all put on their armour, they opened the gateand sallied forth, Ulysses leading the way.
5.   Meanwhile the daughter of Icarius, wise Penelope, had had had a richseat placed for her facing the court and cloisters, so that shecould hear what every one was saying. The dinner indeed had beenprepared amid merriment; it had been both good and abundant, forthey had sacrificed many victims; but the supper was yet to come,and nothing can be conceived more gruesome than the meal which agoddess and a brave man were soon to lay before them- for they hadbrought their doom upon themselves.
6.  "'I have heard nothing,' I answered, 'of Peleus, but I can tellyou all about your son Neoptolemus, for I took him in my own ship fromScyros with the Achaeans. In our councils of war before Troy he wasalways first to speak, and his judgement was unerring. Nestor and Iwere the only two who could surpass him; and when it came tofighting on the plain of Troy, he would never remain with the bodyof his men, but would dash on far in front, foremost of them all invalour. Many a man did he kill in battle- I cannot name every singleone of those whom he slew while fighting on the side of the Argives,but will only say how he killed that valiant hero Eurypylus son ofTelephus, who was the handsomest man I ever saw except Memnon; manyothers also of the Ceteians fell around him by reason of a woman'sbribes. Moreover, when all the bravest of the Argives went insidethe horse that Epeus had made, and it was left to me to settle when weshould either open the door of our ambuscade, or close it, thoughall the other leaders and chief men among the Danaans were dryingtheir eyes and quaking in every limb, I never once saw him turn palenor wipe a tear from his cheek; he was all the time urging me to breakout from the horse- grasping the handle of his sword and hisbronze-shod spear, and breathing fury against the foe. Yet when we hadsacked the city of Priam he got his handsome share of the prizemoney and went on board (such is the fortune of war) without a woundupon him, neither from a thrown spear nor in close combat, for therage of Mars is a matter of great chance.'

应用

1.  "He then took the cup and drank. He was so delighted with thetaste of the wine that he begged me for another bowl full. 'Be sokind,' he said, 'as to give me some more, and tell me your name atonce. I want to make you a present that you will be glad to have. Wehave wine even in this country, for our soil grows grapes and thesun ripens them, but this drinks like nectar and ambrosia all in one.'
2.  Then with both hands he took what Telemachus had sent him, andlaid it on the dirty old wallet at his feet. He went on eating itwhile the bard was singing, and had just finished his dinner as heleft off. The suitors applauded the bard, whereon Minerva went up toUlysses and prompted him to beg pieces of bread from each one of thesuitors, that he might see what kind of people they were, and tell thegood from the bad; but come what might she was not going to save asingle one of them. Ulysses, therefore, went on his round, goingfrom left to right, and stretched out his hands to beg as though hewere a real beggar. Some of them pitied him, and were curious abouthim, asking one another who he was and where he came from; whereon thegoatherd Melanthius said, "Suitors of my noble mistress, I can tellyou something about him, for I have seen him before. The swineherdbrought him here, but I know nothing about the man himself, norwhere he comes from."
3.  This frightened Irus still more, but they brought him into themiddle of the court, and the two men raised their hands to fight. ThenUlysses considered whether he should let drive so hard at him as tomake an end of him then and there, or whether he should give him alighter blow that should only knock him down; in the end he deemedit best to give the lighter blow for fear the Achaeans should begin tosuspect who he was. Then they began to fight, and Irus hit Ulysseson the right shoulder; but Ulysses gave Irus a blow on the neckunder the ear that broke in the bones of his skull, and the blood camegushing out of his mouth; he fell groaning in the dust, gnashing histeeth and kicking on the ground, but the suitors threw up theirhands and nearly died of laughter, as Ulysses caught hold of him bythe foot and dragged him into the outer court as far as thegate-house. There he propped him up against the wall and put his staffin his hands. "Sit here," said he, "and keep the dogs and pigs off;you are a pitiful creature, and if you try to make yourself king ofthe beggars any more you shall fare still worse."
4、  "Father, let me bring you a shield, two spears, and a brass helmetfor your temples. I will arm myself as well, and will bring otherarmour for the swineherd and the stockman, for we had better bearmed."
5、  "Even so, however, I did not get them away without misadventure.We had with us a certain youth named Elpenor, not very remarkablefor sense or courage, who had got drunk and was lying on the house-topaway from the rest of the men, to sleep off his liquor in the cool.When he heard the noise of the men bustling about, he jumped up on asudden and forgot all about coming down by the main staircase, so hetumbled right off the roof and broke his neck, and his soul wentdown to the house of Hades.

旧版特色

!

网友评论(hjurFw5Q74835))

  • 保利 08-09

      To this Ulysses answered, "Amphinomus, you seem to be a man ofgood understanding, as indeed you may well be, seeing whose son youare. I have heard your father well spoken of; he is Nisus ofDulichium, a man both brave and wealthy. They tell me you are his son,and you appear to be a considerable person; listen, therefore, andtake heed to what I am saying. Man is the vainest of all creaturesthat have their being upon earth. As long as heaven vouchsafes himhealth and strength, he thinks that he shall come to no harmhereafter, and even when the blessed gods bring sorrow upon him, hebears it as he needs must, and makes the best of it; for GodAlmighty gives men their daily minds day by day. I know all aboutit, for I was a rich man once, and did much wrong in thestubbornness of my pride, and in the confidence that my father andmy brothers would support me; therefore let a man fear God in allthings always, and take the good that heaven may see fit to send himwithout vainglory. Consider the infamy of what these suitors aredoing; see how they are wasting the estate, and doing dishonour to thewife, of one who is certain to return some day, and that, too, notlong hence. Nay, he will be here soon; may heaven send you homequietly first that you may not meet with him in the day of his coming,for once he is here the suitors and he will not part bloodlessly."

  • 纪王 08-09

      To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "The stranger is quitereasonable. He is avoiding the suitors, and is only doing what any oneelse would do. He asks you to wait till sundown, and it will be muchbetter, madam, that you should have him all to yourself, when youcan hear him and talk to him as you will."

  • 孙科佳 08-09

       Calypso smiled at this and caressed him with her hand: "You know agreat deal," said she, "but you are quite wrong here. May heaven aboveand earth below be my witnesses, with the waters of the river Styx-and this is the most solemn oath which a blessed god can take- thatI mean you no sort of harm, and am only advising you to do exactlywhat I should do myself in your place. I am dealing with you quitestraightforwardly; my heart is not made of iron, and I am very sorryfor you."

  • 王定国 08-09

      With this he drove his goodly steeds back to the city of the Pyliansand soon reached his home, but Telemachus called the men togetherand gave his orders. "Now, my men," said he, "get everything inorder on board the ship, and let us set out home."

  • 赵村 08-08

    {  Thus did he pray, and Minerva heard his prayer. He then led theway to his own house, followed by his sons and sons-in-law. Whenthey had got there and had taken their places on the benches andseats, he mixed them a bowl of sweet wine that was eleven years oldwhen the housekeeper took the lid off the jar that held it. As hemixed the wine, he prayed much and made drink-offerings to Minerva,daughter of Aegis-bearing Jove. Then, when they had made theirdrink-offerings and had drunk each as much as he was minded, theothers went home to bed each in his own abode; but Nestor putTelemachus to sleep in the room that was over the gateway along withPisistratus, who was the only unmarried son now left him. As forhimself, he slept in an inner room of the house, with the queen hiswife by his side.

  • 胡小俊 08-07

      "'Strangers, who are you? Where do sail from? Are you traders, or doyou sail the as rovers, with your hands against every man, and everyman's hand against you?'}

  • 曾诚 08-07

      "'You dare-devil,' replied the goddess, you are always wanting tofight somebody or something; you will not let yourself be beateneven by the immortals. For Scylla is not mortal; moreover she issavage, extreme, rude, cruel and invincible. There is no help forit; your best chance will be to get by her as fast as ever you can,for if you dawdle about her rock while you are putting on your armour,she may catch you with a second cast of her six heads, and snap upanother half dozen of your men; so drive your ship past her at fullspeed, and roar out lustily to Crataiis who is Scylla's dam, badluck to her; she will then stop her from making a second raid uponyou.

  • 黄家驹 08-07

      "The man is no fool," answered Penelope, "it would very likely be ashe says, for there are no such abominable people in the whole world asthese men are."

  • 王绩 08-06

       BOOK XII.

  • 林平 08-04

    {  "Then I saw Chloris, whom Neleus married for her beauty, havinggiven priceless presents for her. She was youngest daughter to Amphionson of Iasus and king of Minyan Orchomenus, and was Queen in Pylos.She bore Nestor, Chromius, and Periclymenus, and she also bore thatmarvellously lovely woman Pero, who was wooed by all the countryround; but Neleus would only give her to him who should raid thecattle of Iphicles from the grazing grounds of Phylace, and this was ahard task. The only man who would undertake to raid them was a certainexcellent seer, but the will of heaven was against him, for therangers of the cattle caught him and put him in prison; neverthelesswhen a full year had passed and the same season came round again,Iphicles set him at liberty, after he had expounded all the oracles ofheaven. Thus, then, was the will of Jove accomplished.

  • 杨振之 08-04

      She heeded her son's words, washed her face, changed her dress,and vowed full and sufficient hecatombs to all the gods if theywould only vouchsafe her revenge upon the suitors.

提交评论