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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:林右昌 大小:zSZkH9OS29190KB 下载:nkhTH5So39865次
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日期:2020-08-05 21:58:55
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  The minstrel Phemius son of Terpes- he who had been forced by thesuitors to sing to them- now tried to save his life. He was standingnear towards the trap door, and held his lyre in his hand. He didnot know whether to fly out of the cloister and sit down by thealtar of Jove that was in the outer court, and on which both Laertesand Ulysses had offered up the thigh bones of many an ox, or whetherto go straight up to Ulysses and embrace his knees, but in the endhe deemed it best to embrace Ulysses' knees. So he laid his lyre onthe ground the ground between the mixing-bowl and the silver-studdedseat; then going up to Ulysses he caught hold of his knees and said,"Ulysses, I beseech you have mercy on me and spare me. You will besorry for it afterwards if you kill a bard who can sing both forgods and men as I can. I make all my lays myself, and heaven visits mewith every kind of inspiration. I would sing to you as though you werea god, do not therefore be in such a hurry to cut my head off. Yourown son Telemachus will tell you that I did not want to frequentyour house and sing to the suitors after their meals, but they weretoo many and too strong for me, so they made me."
2.  "Pisistratus, I hope you will promise to do what I am going to askyou. You know our fathers were old friends before us; moreover, we areboth of an age, and this journey has brought us together still moreclosely; do not, therefore, take me past my ship, but leave methere, for if I go to your father's house he will try to keep me inthe warmth of his good will towards me, and I must go home at once."
3.  Now Venus was just come in from a visit to her father Jove, andwas about sitting down when Mars came inside the house, an said ashe took her hand in his own, "Let us go to the couch of Vulcan: heis not at home, but is gone off to Lemnos among the Sintians, whosespeech is barbarous."
4.TELL ME, O MUSE, of that ingenious hero who travelled far and wideafter he had sacked the famous town of Troy. Many cities did he visit,and many were the nations with whose manners and customs he wasacquainted; moreover he suffered much by sea while trying to savehis own life and bring his men safely home; but do what he might hecould not save his men, for they perished through their own sheerfolly in eating the cattle of the Sun-god Hyperion; so the godprevented them from ever reaching home. Tell me, too, about allthese things, O daughter of Jove, from whatsoever source you mayknow them.
5.  "Take my advice then, and do not go travelling about for long so farfrom home, nor leave your property with such dangerous people inyour house; they will eat up everything you have among them, and youwill have been on a fool's errand. Still, I should advise you by allmeans to go and visit Menelaus, who has lately come off a voyage amongsuch distant peoples as no man could ever hope to get back from,when the winds had once carried him so far out of his reckoning;even birds cannot fly the distance in a twelvemonth, so vast andterrible are the seas that they must cross. Go to him, therefore, bysea, and take your own men with you; or if you would rather travelby land you can have a chariot, you can have horses, and here are mysons who can escort you to Lacedaemon where Menelaus lives. Beg of himto speak the truth, and he will tell you no lies, for he is anexcellent person."
6.  On this she led the way, and Ulysses followed in her steps; butnot one of the Phaecians could see him as he passed through the cityin the midst of them; for the great goddess Minerva in her good willtowards him had hidden him in a thick cloud of darkness. He admiredtheir harbours, ships, places of assembly, and the lofty walls ofthe city, which, with the palisade on top of them, were very striking,and when they reached the king's house Minerva said:

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1.  "I went on board, bidding my men to do so also and loose thehawsers; so they took their places and smote the grey sea with theiroars. When we got to the land, which was not far, there, on the faceof a cliff near the sea, we saw a great cave overhung with laurels. Itwas a station for a great many sheep and goats, and outside therewas a large yard, with a high wall round it made of stones builtinto the ground and of trees both pine and oak. This was the abodeof a huge monster who was then away from home shepherding hisflocks. He would have nothing to do with other people, but led thelife of an outlaw. He was a horrid creature, not like a human being atall, but resembling rather some crag that stands out boldly againstthe sky on the top of a high mountain.
2.  "That night we rested and nursed our anger, for Jove was hatchingmischief against us. But in the morning some of us drew our ships intothe water and put our goods with our women on board, while the rest,about half in number, stayed behind with Agamemnon. We- the otherhalf- embarked and sailed; and the ships went well, for heaven hadsmoothed the sea. When we reached Tenedos we offered sacrifices to thegods, for we were longing to get home; cruel Jove, however, did notyet mean that we should do so, and raised a second quarrel in thecourse of which some among us turned their ships back again, andsailed away under Ulysses to make their peace with Agamemnon; but I,and all the ships that were with me pressed forward, for I saw thatmischief was brewing. The son of Tydeus went on also with me, andhis crews with him. Later on Menelaus joined us at Lesbos, and foundus making up our minds about our course- for we did not know whetherto go outside Chios by the island of Psyra, keeping this to ourleft, or inside Chios, over against the stormy headland of Mimas. Sowe asked heaven for a sign, and were shown one to the effect that weshould be soonest out of danger if we headed our ships across the opensea to Euboea. This we therefore did, and a fair wind sprang upwhich gave us a quick passage during the night to Geraestus, wherewe offered many sacrifices to Neptune for having helped us so far onour way. Four days later Diomed and his men stationed their ships inArgos, but I held on for Pylos, and the wind never fell light from theday when heaven first made it fair for me.
3.  But Ulysses, when he had taken it up and examined it all over,strung it as easily as a skilled bard strings a new peg of his lyreand makes the twisted gut fast at both ends. Then he took it in hisright hand to prove the string, and it sang sweetly under his touchlike the twittering of a swallow. The suitors were dismayed, andturned colour as they heard it; at that moment, moreover, Jovethundered loudly as a sign, and the heart of Ulysses rejoiced as heheard the omen that the son of scheming Saturn had sent him.
4.  "These two," continued Ulysses, "will not keep long out of the fray,when the suitors and we join fight in my house. Now, therefore, returnhome early to-morrow morning, and go about among the suitors asbefore. Later on the swineherd will bring me to the city disguisedas a miserable old beggar. If you see them ill-treating me, steel yourheart against my sufferings; even though they drag me feet foremostout of the house, or throw things at me, look on and do nothing beyondgently trying to make them behave more reasonably; but they will notlisten to you, for the day of their reckoning is at hand.Furthermore I say, and lay my saying to your heart, when Minerva shallput it in my mind, I will nod my head to you, and on seeing me do thisyou must collect all the armour that is in the house and hide it inthe strong store room. Make some excuse when the suitors ask you whyyou are removing it; say that you have taken it to be out of the wayof the smoke, inasmuch as it is no longer what it was when Ulysseswent away, but has become soiled and begrimed with soot. Add to thismore particularly that you are afraid Jove may set them on toquarrel over their wine, and that they may do each other some harmwhich may disgrace both banquet and wooing, for the sight of armssometimes tempts people to use them. But leave a sword and a spearapiece for yourself and me, and a couple oxhide shields so that we cansnatch them up at any moment; Jove and Minerva will then soon quietthese people. There is also another matter; if you are indeed my sonand my blood runs in your veins, let no one know that Ulysses iswithin the house- neither Laertes, nor yet the swineherd, nor any ofthe servants, nor even Penelope herself. Let you and me exploit thewomen alone, and let us also make trial of some other of the menservants, to see who is on our side and whose hand is against us."
5.  Now when Penelope heard that the beggar had been struck in thebanqueting-cloister, she said before her maids, "Would that Apollowould so strike you, Antinous," and her waiting woman Eurynomeanswered, "If our prayers were answered not one of the suitors wouldever again see the sun rise." Then Penelope said, "Nurse, I hate everysingle one of them, for they mean nothing but mischief, but I hateAntinous like the darkness of death itself. A poor unfortunate tramphas come begging about the house for sheer want. Every one else hasgiven him something to put in his wallet, but Antinous has hit himon the right shoulder-blade with a footstool."
6.  "First light me a fire," replied Ulysses.

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1.  When the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, Menelausrose and dressed himself. He bound his sandals on to his comelyfeet, girded his sword about his shoulders, and left his roomlooking like an immortal god. Then, taking a seat near Telemachus hesaid:
2.  With these words she came down from her upper room, not alone butattended by two of her maidens, and when she reached the suitors shestood by one of the bearing-posts supporting the roof of the cloister,holding a veil before her face, and with a staid maid servant oneither side of her. As they beheld her the suitors were so overpoweredand became so desperately enamoured of her, that each one prayed hemight win her for his own bed fellow.
3.  "'When you shall have thus besought the ghosts with your prayers,offer them a ram and a black ewe, bending their heads towardsErebus; but yourself turn away from them as though you would maketowards the river. On this, many dead men's ghosts will come to you,and you must tell your men to skin the two sheep that you have justkilled, and offer them as a burnt sacrifice with prayers to Hadesand to Proserpine. Then draw your sword and sit there, so as toprevent any other poor ghost from coming near the split blood beforeTeiresias shall have answered your questions. The seer willpresently come to you, and will tell you about your voyage- whatstages you are to make, and how you are to sail the see so as to reachyour home.'
4.  Meantime the suitors went on board and sailed their ways over thesea, intent on murdering Telemachus. Now there is a rocky islet calledAsteris, of no great size, in mid channel between Ithaca and Samos,and there is a harbour on either side of it where a ship can lie. Herethen the Achaeans placed themselves in ambush.
5.   "If Jove were to bring this to pass," replied the stockman, "youshould see how I would do my very utmost to help him."
6.  Therewith she went down into the cave to look for the safesthiding places, while Ulysses brought up all the treasure of gold,bronze, and good clothing which the Phaecians had given him. Theystowed everything carefully away, and Minerva set a stone againstthe door of the cave. Then the two sat down by the root of the greatolive, and consulted how to compass the destruction of the wickedsuitors.

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1.  "Thence we sailed onward with sorrow in our hearts, but glad to haveescaped death though we had lost our comrades, nor did we leave tillwe had thrice invoked each one of the poor fellows who had perished bythe hands of the Cicons. Then Jove raised the North wind against ustill it blew a hurricane, so that land and sky were hidden in thickclouds, and night sprang forth out of the heavens. We let the shipsrun before the gale, but the force of the wind tore our sails totatters, so we took them down for fear of shipwreck, and rowed ourhardest towards the land. There we lay two days and two nightssuffering much alike from toil and distress of mind, but on themorning of the third day we again raised our masts, set sail, and tookour places, letting the wind and steersmen direct our ship. I shouldhave got home at that time unharmed had not the North wind and thecurrents been against me as I was doubling Cape Malea, and set meoff my course hard by the island of Cythera.
2.  She then went quickly on, and Telemachus followed in her stepstill they reached the place where the guilds of the Pylian people wereassembled. There they found Nestor sitting with his sons, while hiscompany round him were busy getting dinner ready, and putting piecesof meat on to the spits while other pieces were cooking. When they sawthe strangers they crowded round them, took them by the hand andbade them take their places. Nestor's son Pisistratus at onceoffered his hand to each of them, and seated them on some softsheepskins that were lying on the sands near his father and hisbrother Thrasymedes. Then he gave them their portions of the inwardmeats and poured wine for them into a golden cup, handing it toMinerva first, and saluting her at the same time.
3.  Thus did he pray, and Minerva heard his prayer. He then led theway to his own house, followed by his sons and sons-in-law. Whenthey had got there and had taken their places on the benches andseats, he mixed them a bowl of sweet wine that was eleven years oldwhen the housekeeper took the lid off the jar that held it. As hemixed the wine, he prayed much and made drink-offerings to Minerva,daughter of Aegis-bearing Jove. Then, when they had made theirdrink-offerings and had drunk each as much as he was minded, theothers went home to bed each in his own abode; but Nestor putTelemachus to sleep in the room that was over the gateway along withPisistratus, who was the only unmarried son now left him. As forhimself, he slept in an inner room of the house, with the queen hiswife by his side.
4、  Furthermore she went to the house of Ulysses, and threw thesuitors into a deep slumber. She caused their drink to fuddle them,and made them drop their cups from their hands, so that instead ofsitting over their wine, they went back into the town to sleep, withtheir eyes heavy and full of drowsiness. Then she took the form andvoice of Mentor, and called Telemachus to come outside.
5、  "Good heavens," said he, "see how the gods have saved this manfrom destruction. We kept a succession of scouts upon the headlandsall day long, and when the sun was down we never went on shore tosleep, but waited in the ship all night till morning in the hope ofcapturing and killing him; but some god has conveyed him home in spiteof us. Let us consider how we can make an end of him. He must notescape us; our affair is never likely to come off while is alive,for he is very shrewd, and public feeling is by no means all on ourside. We must make haste before he can call the Achaeans inassembly; he will lose no time in doing so, for he will be furiouswith us, and will tell all the world how we plotted to kill him, butfailed to take him. The people will not like this when they come toknow of it; we must see that they do us no hurt, nor drive us from ourown country into exile. Let us try and lay hold of him either on hisfarm away from the town, or on the road hither. Then we can divideup his property amongst us, and let his mother and the man who marriesher have the house. If this does not please you, and you wishTelemachus to live on and hold his father's property, then we must notgather here and eat up his goods in this way, but must make our offersto Penelope each from his own house, and she can marry the man whowill give the most for her, and whose lot it is to win her."

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  • 张纯军 08-04

      "When we reached it we went ashore to take in water, and dinedhard by the ships. Immediately after dinner I took a herald and one ofmy men and went straight to the house of Aeolus, where I found himfeasting with his wife and family; so we sat down as suppliants on thethreshold. They were astounded when they saw us and said, 'Ulysses,what brings you here? What god has been ill-treating you? We tookgreat pains to further you on your way home to Ithaca, or whereverit was that you wanted to go to.'

  • 韩胜强 08-04

      With this Telemachus dashed his staff to the ground and burst intotears. Every one was very sorry for him, but they all sat still and noone ventured to make him an angry answer, save only Antinous, whospoke thus:

  • 岛崎遥香 08-04

       "'Can you show me,' said I, 'some stratagem by means of which Imay catch this old god without his suspecting it and finding me out?For a god is not easily caught- not by a mortal man.'

  • 韦旭生 08-04

      "I then gave him some more; three times did I fill the bowl for him,and three times did he drain it without thought or heed; then, whenI saw that the wine had got into his head, I said to him asplausibly as I could: 'Cyclops, you ask my name and I will tell ityou; give me, therefore, the present you promised me; my name isNoman; this is what my father and mother and my friends have alwayscalled me.'

  • 侯颖举 08-03

    {  To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "My son, I will tellyou the real truth. He says he is a Cretan, and that he has been agreat traveller. At this moment he is running away from aThesprotian ship, and has refuge at my station, so I will put him intoyour hands. Do whatever you like with him, only remember that he isyour suppliant."

  • 戴武兵 08-02

      "I was driven thence by foul winds for a space of nine days upon thesea, but on the tenth day we reached the land of the Lotus-eater,who live on a food that comes from a kind of flower. Here we landed totake in fresh water, and our crews got their mid-day meal on the shorenear the ships. When they had eaten and drunk I sent two of my companyto see what manner of men the people of the place might be, and theyhad a third man under them. They started at once, and went about amongthe Lotus-eaters, who did them no hurt, but gave them to eat of thelotus, which was so delicious that those who ate of it left off caringabout home, and did not even want to go back and say what had happenedto them, but were for staying and munching lotus with theLotus-eater without thinking further of their return; nevertheless,though they wept bitterly I forced them back to the ships and madethem fast under the benches. Then I told the rest to go on board atonce, lest any of them should taste of the lotus and leave off wantingto get home, so they took their places and smote the grey sea withtheir oars.}

  • 吉扎西 08-02

      "Alcinous," answered Ulysses, "there is a time for makingspeeches, and a time for going to bed; nevertheless, since you sodesire, I will not refrain from telling you the still sadder tale ofthose of my comrades who did not fall fighting with the Trojans, butperished on their return, through the treachery of a wicked woman.

  • 崔龙海 08-02

      "We soon reached his cave, but he was out shepherding, so we wentinside and took stock of all that we could see. His cheese-rackswere loaded with cheeses, and he had more lambs and kids than his penscould hold. They were kept in separate flocks; first there were thehoggets, then the oldest of the younger lambs and lastly the veryyoung ones all kept apart from one another; as for his dairy, allthe vessels, bowls, and milk pails into which he milked, were swimmingwith whey. When they saw all this, my men begged me to let themfirst steal some cheeses, and make off with them to the ship; theywould then return, drive down the lambs and kids, put them on boardand sail away with them. It would have been indeed better if we haddone so but I would not listen to them, for I wanted to see theowner himself, in the hope that he might give me a present. When,however, we saw him my poor men found him ill to deal with.

  • 罗马什娜 08-01

       "'This,' I answered, 'must be as it may please heaven, but tell meand tell me and tell me true, I see my poor mother's ghost close byus; she is sitting by the blood without saying a word, and though I amher own son she does not remember me and speak to me; tell me, Sir,how I can make her know me.'

  • 周乙陶 07-30

    {  "Take my advice then, and do not go travelling about for long so farfrom home, nor leave your property with such dangerous people inyour house; they will eat up everything you have among them, and youwill have been on a fool's errand. Still, I should advise you by allmeans to go and visit Menelaus, who has lately come off a voyage amongsuch distant peoples as no man could ever hope to get back from,when the winds had once carried him so far out of his reckoning;even birds cannot fly the distance in a twelvemonth, so vast andterrible are the seas that they must cross. Go to him, therefore, bysea, and take your own men with you; or if you would rather travelby land you can have a chariot, you can have horses, and here are mysons who can escort you to Lacedaemon where Menelaus lives. Beg of himto speak the truth, and he will tell you no lies, for he is anexcellent person."

  • 朴辰英 07-30

      "When I heard him I was in two minds whether or no to draw thekeen blade that hung by my sturdy thigh and cut his head off inspite of his being a near relation of my own; but the men intercededfor him and said, 'Sir, if it may so be, let this fellow stay here andmind the ship, but take the rest of us with you to Circe's house.'

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