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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:大赞 大小:jIXKc5NP48576KB 下载:mDFBCGF062978次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:1xFLoPrD71771条
日期:2020-08-11 00:14:43
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埃弗顿

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Minerva now made the suitors fall to laughing immoderately, andset their wits wandering; but they were laughing with a forcedlaughter. Their meat became smeared with blood; their eyes filled withtears, and their hearts were heavy with forebodings. Theoclymenussaw this and said, "Unhappy men, what is it that ails you? There isa shroud of darkness drawn over you from head to foot, your cheeks arewet with tears; the air is alive with wailing voices; the walls androof-beams drip blood; the gate of the cloisters and the courtbeyond them are full of ghosts trooping down into the night of hell;the sun is blotted out of heaven, and a blighting gloom is over allthe land."
2.  Then Minerva put it into the mind of Penelope to show herself to thesuitors, that she might make them still more enamoured of her, and winstill further honour from her son and husband. So she feigned amocking laugh and said, "Eurynome, I have changed my and have afancy to show myself to the suitors although I detest them. I shouldlike also to give my son a hint that he had better not have anythingmore to do with them. They speak fairly enough but they meanmischief."
3.  BOOK IX.
4.  Thus did they converse, but King Apollo said to Mercury,"Messenger Mercury, giver of good things, you would not care howstrong the chains were, would you, if you could sleep with Venus?"
5.  "Meanwhile Menelaus and I were on our way home from Troy, on goodterms with one another. When we got to Sunium, which is the point ofAthens, Apollo with his painless shafts killed Phrontis thesteersman of Menelaus' ship (and never man knew better how to handle avessel in rough weather) so that he died then and there with thehelm in his hand, and Menelaus, though very anxious to pressforward, had to wait in order to bury his comrade and give him his duefuneral rites. Presently, when he too could put to sea again, andhad sailed on as far as the Malean heads, Jove counselled evil againsthim and made it it blow hard till the waves ran mountains high. Herehe divided his fleet and took the one half towards Crete where theCydonians dwell round about the waters of the river Iardanus. There isa high headland hereabouts stretching out into the sea from a placecalled Gortyn, and all along this part of the coast as far as Phaestusthe sea runs high when there is a south wind blowing, but arterPhaestus the coast is more protected, for a small headland can makea great shelter. Here this part of the fleet was driven on to therocks and wrecked; but the crews just managed to save themselves. Asfor the other five ships, they were taken by winds and seas toEgypt, where Menelaus gathered much gold and substance among people ofan alien speech. Meanwhile Aegisthus here at home plotted his evildeed. For seven years after he had killed Agamemnon he ruled inMycene, and the people were obedient under him, but in the eighth yearOrestes came back from Athens to be his bane, and killed themurderer of his father. Then he celebrated the funeral rites of hismother and of false Aegisthus by a banquet to the people of Argos, andon that very day Menelaus came home, with as much treasure as hisships could carry.
6.  "As he spoke he pulled the herb out of the ground an showed mewhat it was like. The root was black, while the flower was as white asmilk; the gods call it Moly, and mortal men cannot uproot it, butthe gods can do whatever they like.

计划指导

1.  "'Then,' said they, 'if no man is attacking you, you must be ill;when Jove makes people ill, there is no help for it, and you hadbetter pray to your father Neptune.'
2.  He left the house as he spoke, and went back to Piraeus who gave himwelcome, but the suitors kept looking at one another and provokingTelemachus fly laughing at the strangers. One insolent fellow saidto him, "Telemachus, you are not happy in your guests; first youhave this importunate tramp, who comes begging bread and wine andhas no skill for work or for hard fighting, but is perfectlyuseless, and now here is another fellow who is setting himself up as aprophet. Let me persuade you, for it will be much better, to putthem on board ship and send them off to the Sicels to sell for whatthey will bring."
3.  His son, Theoclymenus, it was who now came up to Telemachus as hewas making drink-offerings and praying in his ship. "Friend'" said he,"now that I find you sacrificing in this place, I beseech you byyour sacrifices themselves, and by the god to whom you make them, Ipray you also by your own head and by those of your followers, tell methe truth and nothing but the truth. Who and whence are you? Tell mealso of your town and parents."
4.  She said this to try him, but Ulysses was very angry and said,"Wife, I am much displeased at what you have just been saying. Who hasbeen taking my bed from the place in which I left it? He must havefound it a hard task, no matter how skilled a workman he was, unlesssome god came and helped him to shift it. There is no man living,however strong and in his prime, who could move it from its place, forit is a marvellous curiosity which I made with my very own hands.There was a young olive growing within the precincts of the house,in full vigour, and about as thick as a bearing-post. I built myroom round this with strong walls of stone and a roof to cover them,and I made the doors strong and well-fitting. Then I cut off the topboughs of the olive tree and left the stump standing. This I dressedroughly from the root upwards and then worked with carpenter's toolswell and skilfully, straightening my work by drawing a line on thewood, and making it into a bed-prop. I then bored a hole down themiddle, and made it the centre-post of my bed, at which I workedtill I had finished it, inlaying it with gold and silver; after this Istretched a hide of crimson leather from one side of it to theother. So you see I know all about it, and I desire to learn whetherit is still there, or whether any one has been removing it bycutting down the olive tree at its roots."
5.  Thus did they converse. Eurymachus then came up and said, "QueenPenelope, daughter of Icarius, if all the Achaeans in Iasian Argoscould see you at this moment, you would have still more suitors inyour house by tomorrow morning, for you are the most admirable womanin the whole world both as regards personal beauty and strength ofunderstanding."
6.  Then Medon said, "I wish, Madam, that this were all; but they areplotting something much more dreadful now- may heaven frustratetheir design. They are going to try and murder Telemachus as he iscoming home from Pylos and Lacedaemon, where he has been to get newsof his father."

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1.  "'Can you show me,' said I, 'some stratagem by means of which Imay catch this old god without his suspecting it and finding me out?For a god is not easily caught- not by a mortal man.'
2.  "Ulysses," said Minerva, "noble son of Laertes, think how you canlay hands on these disreputable people who have been lording it inyour house these three years, courting your wife and making weddingpresents to her, while she does nothing but lament your absence,giving hope and sending your encouraging messages to every one ofthem, but meaning the very opposite of all she says'
3.  "'When you shall have thus besought the ghosts with your prayers,offer them a ram and a black ewe, bending their heads towardsErebus; but yourself turn away from them as though you would maketowards the river. On this, many dead men's ghosts will come to you,and you must tell your men to skin the two sheep that you have justkilled, and offer them as a burnt sacrifice with prayers to Hadesand to Proserpine. Then draw your sword and sit there, so as toprevent any other poor ghost from coming near the split blood beforeTeiresias shall have answered your questions. The seer willpresently come to you, and will tell you about your voyage- whatstages you are to make, and how you are to sail the see so as to reachyour home.'
4.  Ulysses answered, "Telemachus and I will hold these suitors incheck, no matter what they do; go back both of you and bindMelanthius' hands and feet behind him. Throw him into the store roomand make the door fast behind you; then fasten a noose about his body,and string him close up to the rafters from a high bearing-post,that he may linger on in an agony."
5.   But Telemachus said, "Hush, do not answer him; Antinous has thebitterest tongue of all the suitors, and he makes the others worse."
6.  Eurymachus son of Polybus then said, "Go home, old man, and prophesyto your own children, or it may be worse for them. I can read theseomens myself much better than you can; birds are always flying aboutin the sunshine somewhere or other, but they seldom mean anything.Ulysses has died in a far country, and it is a pity you are not deadalong with him, instead of prating here about omens and adding fuel tothe anger of Telemachus which is fierce enough as it is. I suppose youthink he will give you something for your family, but I tell you-and it shall surely be- when an old man like you, who should knowbetter, talks a young one over till he becomes troublesome, in thefirst place his young friend will only fare so much the worse- he willtake nothing by it, for the suitors will prevent this- and in thenext, we will lay a heavier fine, sir, upon yourself than you willat all like paying, for it will bear hardly upon you. As forTelemachus, I warn him in the presence of you all to send his motherback to her father, who will find her a husband and provide her withall the marriage gifts so dear a daughter may expect. Till we shall goon harassing him with our suit; for we fear no man, and care neitherfor him, with all his fine speeches, nor for any fortune-telling ofyours. You may preach as much as you please, but we shall only hateyou the more. We shall go back and continue to eat up Telemachus'sestate without paying him, till such time as his mother leaves offtormenting us by keeping us day after day on the tiptoe ofexpectation, each vying with the other in his suit for a prize of suchrare perfection. Besides we cannot go after the other women whom weshould marry in due course, but for the way in which she treats us."

应用

1.  Telemachus answered boldly, for Minerva had given him courage to askabout his father and get himself a good name.
2.  "To this he gave me but a pitiless answer, 'Stranger,' said he, 'youare a fool, or else you know nothing of this country. Talk to me,indeed, about fearing the gods or shunning their anger? We Cyclopes donot care about Jove or any of your blessed gods, for we are ever somuch stronger than they. I shall not spare either yourself or yourcompanions out of any regard for Jove, unless I am in the humour fordoing so. And now tell me where you made your ship fast when youcame on shore. Was it round the point, or is she lying straight offthe land?'
3.  As he spoke a sea broke over him with such terrific fury that theraft reeled again, and he was carried overboard a long way off. He letgo the helm, and the force of the hurricane was so great that it brokethe mast half way up, and both sail and yard went over into the sea.For a long time Ulysses was under water, and it was all he could do torise to the surface again, for the clothes Calypso had given himweighed him down; but at last he got his head above water and spat outthe bitter brine that was running down his face in streams. In spiteof all this, however, he did not lose sight of his raft, but swam asfast as he could towards it, got hold of it, and climbed on boardagain so as to escape drowning. The sea took the raft and tossed itabout as Autumn winds whirl thistledown round and round upon a road.It was as though the South, North, East, and West winds were allplaying battledore and shuttlecock with it at once.
4、  "My sons," said he, "make haste to do as I shall bid you. I wishfirst and foremost to propitiate the great goddess Minerva, whomanifested herself visibly to me during yesterday's festivities. Go,then, one or other of you to the plain, tell the stockman to look meout a heifer, and come on here with it at once. Another must go toTelemachus's ship, and invite all the crew, leaving two men only incharge of the vessel. Some one else will run and fetch Laerceus thegoldsmith to gild the horns of the heifer. The rest, stay all of youwhere you are; tell the maids in the house to prepare an excellentdinner, and to fetch seats, and logs of wood for a burnt offering.Tell them also- to bring me some clear spring water."
5、  "Father Jove," he cried, "and all you other blessed gods who livefor ever, come here and see the ridiculous and disgraceful sightthat I will show you. Jove's daughter Venus is always dishonouringme because I am lame. She is in love with Mars, who is handsome andclean built, whereas I am a cripple- but my parents are to blame forthat, not I; they ought never to have begotten me. Come and see thepair together asleep on my bed. It makes me furious to look at them.They are very fond of one another, but I do not think they will liethere longer than they can help, nor do I think that they will sleepmuch; there, however, they shall stay till her father has repaid methe sum I gave him for his baggage of a daughter, who is fair butnot honest."

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  • 唐剑 08-10

      Thus spoke Minerva, and Ulysses obeyed her gladly. Then Minervaassumed the form and voice of Mentor, and presently made a covenant ofpeace between the two contending parties.

  • 袁潜华 08-10

      "If you are Ulysses," said he, "then what you have said is just.We have done much wrong on your lands and in your house. ButAntinous who was the head and front of the offending lies low already.It was all his doing. It was not that he wanted to marry Penelope;he did not so much care about that; what he wanted was something quitedifferent, and Jove has not vouchsafed it to him; he wanted to killyour son and to be chief man in Ithaca. Now, therefore, that he hasmet the death which was his due, spare the lives of your people. Wewill make everything good among ourselves, and pay you in full for allthat we have eaten and drunk. Each one of us shall pay you a fineworth twenty oxen, and we will keep on giving you gold and bronze tillyour heart is softened. Until we have done this no one can complain ofyour being enraged against us."

  • 沃尔特·施伦贝格 08-10

       With this Telemachus dashed his staff to the ground and burst intotears. Every one was very sorry for him, but they all sat still and noone ventured to make him an angry answer, save only Antinous, whospoke thus:

  • 黄关春 08-10

      And Eumaeus answered, "Old man, you have told us an excellent story,and have said nothing so far but what is quite satisfactory; for thepresent, therefore, you shall want neither clothing nor anythingelse that a stranger in distress may reasonably expect, butto-morrow morning you have to shake your own old rags about yourbody again, for we have not many spare cloaks nor shirts up here,but every man has only one. When Ulysses' son comes home again he willgive you both cloak and shirt, and send you wherever you may want togo."

  • 良驹 08-09

    {  Eurymachus was furious at all this. He scowled at him and cried,"You wretch, I will soon pay you out for daring to say such thingsto me, and in public too. Has the wine been getting into your heador do you always babble in this way? You seem to have lost your witsbecause you beat the tramp Irus. With this he caught hold of afootstool, but Ulysses sought protection at the knees of Amphinomus ofDulichium, for he was afraid. The stool hit the cupbearer on his righthand and knocked him down: the man fell with a cry flat on his back,and his wine-jug fell ringing to the ground. The suitors in thecovered cloister were now in an uproar, and one would turn towards hisneighbour, saying, "I wish the stranger had gone somewhere else, badluck to hide, for all the trouble he gives us. We cannot permit suchdisturbance about a beggar; if such ill counsels are to prevail weshall have no more pleasure at our banquet."

  • 范平明 08-08

      She was nothing loth, so they went to the couch to take theirrest, whereon they were caught in the toils which cunning Vulcan hadspread for them, and could neither get up nor stir hand or foot, butfound too late that they were in a trap. Then Vulcan came up tothem, for he had turned back before reaching Lemnos, when his scoutthe sun told him what was going on. He was in a furious passion, andstood in the vestibule making a dreadful noise as he shouted to allthe gods.}

  • 张小飞 08-08

      As he spoke he drew his rags aside from the great scar, and whenthey had examined it thoroughly, they both of them wept about Ulysses,threw their arms round him and kissed his head and shoulders, whileUlysses kissed their hands and faces in return. The sun would havegone down upon their mourning if Ulysses had not checked them andsaid:

  • 冯思羽 08-08

      The rest agreed, and Leiodes son of OEnops was the first to rise. Hewas sacrificial priest to the suitors, and sat in the corner nearthe mixing-bowl. He was the only man who hated their evil deeds andwas indignant with the others. He was now the first to take the bowand arrow, so he went on to the pavement to make his trial, but hecould not string the bow, for his hands were weak and unused to hardwork, they therefore soon grew tired, and he said to the suitors,"My friends, I cannot string it; let another have it; this bow shalltake the life and soul out of many a chief among us, for it isbetter to die than to live after having missed the prize that wehave so long striven for, and which has brought us so long together.Some one of us is even now hoping and praying that he may marryPenelope, but when he has seen this bow and tried it, let him wooand make bridal offerings to some other woman, and let Penelopemarry whoever makes her the best offer and whose lot it is to winher."

  • 毛书兵 08-07

       "Telemachus," said she, addressing her son, "I fear you are nolonger so discreet and well conducted as you used to be. When you wereyounger you had a greater sense of propriety; now, however, that youare grown up, though a stranger to look at you would take you forthe son of a well-to-do father as far as size and good looks go,your conduct is by no means what it should be. What is all thisdisturbance that has been going on, and how came you to allow astranger to be so disgracefully ill-treated? What would havehappened if he had suffered serious injury while a suppliant in ourhouse? Surely this would have been very discreditable to you."

  • 麦卡锡 08-05

    {  "I spoke comfortingly to them and said, 'We must draw our ship on tothe land, and hide the ship's gear with all our property in some cave;then come with me all of you as fast as you can to Circe's house,where you will find your comrades eating and drinking in the midstof great abundance.'

  • 蒲云 08-05

      He took an arrow that was lying upon the table- for those whichthe Achaeans were so shortly about to taste were all inside thequiver- he laid it on the centre-piece of the bow, and drew thenotch of the arrow and the string toward him, still seated on hisseat. When he had taken aim he let fly, and his arrow pierced everyone of the handle-holes of the axes from the first onwards till it hadgone right through them, and into the outer courtyard. Then he said toTelemachus:

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