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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:孙佳 大小:9hLD8FRq50425KB 下载:vL2yRmUA35721次
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日期:2020-08-10 05:37:22
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谢东波

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  He began with his victory over the Cicons, and how he thence reachedthe fertile land of the Lotus-eaters. He told her all about theCyclops and how he had punished him for having so ruthlessly eaten hisbrave comrades; how he then went on to Aeolus, who received himhospitably and furthered him on his way, but even so he was not toreach home, for to his great grief a hurricane carried him out tosea again; how he went on to the Laestrygonian city Telepylos, wherethe people destroyed all his ships with their crews, save himselfand his own ship only. Then he told of cunning Circe and her craft,and how he sailed to the chill house of Hades, to consult the ghost ofthe Theban prophet Teiresias, and how he saw his old comrades in arms,and his mother who bore him and brought him up when he was a child;how he then heard the wondrous singing of the Sirens, and went on tothe wandering rocks and terrible Charybdis and to Scylla, whom noman had ever yet passed in safety; how his men then ate the cattleof the sun-god, and how Jove therefore struck the ship with histhunderbolts, so that all his men perished together, himself alonebeing left alive; how at last he reached the Ogygian island and thenymph Calypso, who kept him there in a cave, and fed him, and wantedhim to marry her, in which case she intended making him immortal sothat he should never grow old, but she could not persuade him to lether do so; and how after much suffering he had found his way to thePhaeacians, who had treated him as though he had been a god, andsent him back in a ship to his own country after having given himgold, bronze, and raiment in great abundance. This was the lastthing about which he told her, for here a deep sleep took hold uponhim and eased the burden of his sorrows.
2.  As soon as Euryclea had got the scarred limb in her hands and hadwell hold of it, she recognized it and dropped the foot at once. Theleg fell into the bath, which rang out and was overturned, so that allthe water was spilt on the ground; Euryclea's eyes between her joy andher grief filled with tears, and she could not speak, but she caughtUlysses by the beard and said, "My dear child, I am sure you must beUlysses himself, only I did not know you till I had actually touchedand handled you."
3.  Thus, then, the ship sped on her way through the watches of thenight from dark till dawn.
4.  As he spoke he sat down, and Telemachus threw his arms about hisfather and wept. They were both so much moved that they cried aloudlike eagles or vultures with crooked talons that have been robbed oftheir half fledged young by peasants. Thus piteously did they weep,and the sun would have gone down upon their mourning if Telemachus hadnot suddenly said, "In what ship, my dear father, did your crewbring you to Ithaca? Of what nation did they declare themselves to be-for you cannot have come by land?"
5.  BOOK II.
6.  ULYSSES slept in the cloister upon an undressed bullock's hide, onthe top of which he threw several skins of the sheep the suitors hadeaten, and Eurynome threw a cloak over him after he had laid himselfdown. There, then, Ulysses lay wakefully brooding upon the way inwhich he should kill the suitors; and by and by, the women who hadbeen in the habit of misconducting themselves with them, left thehouse giggling and laughing with one another. This made Ulysses veryangry, and he doubted whether to get up and kill every single one ofthem then and there, or to let them sleep one more and last timewith the suitors. His heart growled within him, and as a bitch withpuppies growls and shows her teeth when she sees a stranger, so didhis heart growl with anger at the evil deeds that were being done: buthe beat his breast and said, "Heart, be still, you had worse than thisto bear on the day when the terrible Cyclops ate your bravecompanions; yet you bore it in silence till your cunning got yousafe out of the cave, though you made sure of being killed."

计划指导

1.  Into this harbour, then, they took their ship, for they knew theplace, She had so much way upon her that she ran half her own lengthon to the shore; when, however, they had landed, the first thingthey did was to lift Ulysses with his rug and linen sheet out of theship, and lay him down upon the sand still fast asleep. Then they tookout the presents which Minerva had persuaded the Phaeacians to givehim when he was setting out on his voyage homewards. They put theseall together by the root of the olive tree, away from the road, forfear some passer by might come and steal them before Ulysses awoke;and then they made the best of their way home again.
2.  "'My friends,' said I, 'this is not the first time that we have beenin danger, and we are in nothing like so bad a case as when theCyclops shut us up in his cave; nevertheless, my courage and wisecounsel saved us then, and we shall live to look back on all this aswell. Now, therefore, let us all do as I say, trust in Jove and row onwith might and main. As for you, coxswain, these are your orders;attend to them, for the ship is in your hands; turn her head away fromthese steaming rapids and hug the rock, or she will give you theslip and be over yonder before you know where you are, and you will bethe death of us.'
3.  "I am not surprised, my dear mother, at your displeasure," repliedTelemachus, "I understand all about it and know when things are not asthey should be, which I could not do when I was younger; I cannot,however, behave with perfect propriety at all times. First one andthen another of these wicked people here keeps driving me out of mymind, and I have no one to stand by me. After all, however, this fightbetween Irus and the stranger did not turn out as the suitors meant itto do, for the stranger got the best of it. I wish Father Jove,Minerva, and Apollo would break the neck of every one of thesewooers of yours, some inside the house and some out; and I wish theymight all be as limp as Irus is over yonder in the gate of the outercourt. See how he nods his head like a drunken man; he has had sucha thrashing that he cannot stand on his feet nor get back to his home,wherever that may be, for has no strength left in him."
4.  "This may not be, Agelaus," answered Melanthius, "the mouth of thenarrow passage is dangerously near the entrance to the outer court.One brave man could prevent any number from getting in. But I knowwhat I will do, I will bring you arms from the store room, for I amsure it is there that Ulysses and his son have put them."
5.  Then Antinous said, "Queen Penelope, daughter of Icarius, take asmany presents as you please from any one who will give them to you; itis not well to refuse a present; but we will not go about our businessnor stir from where we are, till you have married the best man amongus whoever he may be."
6.  And Piraeus answered, "Telemachus, you may stay away as long asyou please, but I will look after him for you, and he shall find nolack of hospitality."

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1.  Thereon he gathered his clouds together, grasped his trident,stirred it round in the sea, and roused the rage of every wind thatblows till earth, sea, and sky were hidden in cloud, and nightsprang forth out of the heavens. Winds from East, South, North, andWest fell upon him all at the same time, and a tremendous sea gotup, so that Ulysses' heart began to fail him. "Alas," he said tohimself in his dismay, "what ever will become of me? I am afraidCalypso was right when she said I should have trouble by sea beforeI got back home. It is all coming true. How black is Jove makingheaven with his clouds, and what a sea the winds are raising fromevery quarter at once. I am now safe to perish. Blest and thrice blestwere those Danaans who fell before Troy in the cause of the sons ofAtreus. Would that had been killed on the day when the Trojans werepressing me so sorely about the dead body of Achilles, for then Ishould have had due burial and the Achaeans would have honoured myname; but now it seems that I shall come to a most pitiable end."
2.  "Suitors of the illustrious queen, listen that I may speak even as Iam minded. I appeal more especially to Eurymachus, and to Antinous whohas just spoken with so much reason. Cease shooting for the presentand leave the matter to the gods, but in the morning let heaven givevictory to whom it will. For the moment, however, give me the bow thatI may prove the power of my hands among you all, and see whether Istill have as much strength as I used to have, or whether travel andneglect have made an end of it."
3.  Then Antinous said, "Queen Penelope, daughter of Icarius, take asmany presents as you please from any one who will give them to you; itis not well to refuse a present; but we will not go about our businessnor stir from where we are, till you have married the best man amongus whoever he may be."
4.  "I am afraid of the gossip and scandal that may be set on footagainst me later on; for the people here are very ill-natured, andsome low fellow, if he met us, might say, 'Who is this fine-lookingstranger that is going about with Nausicaa? Where did she End him? Isuppose she is going to marry him. Perhaps he is a vagabond sailorwhom she has taken from some foreign vessel, for we have noneighbours; or some god has at last come down from heaven in answer toher prayers, and she is going to live with him all the rest of herlife. It would be a good thing if she would take herself of I for shand find a husband somewhere else, for she will not look at one of themany excellent young Phaeacians who are in with her.' This is the kindof disparaging remark that would be made about me, and I could notcomplain, for I should myself be scandalized at seeing any othergirl do the like, and go about with men in spite of everybody, whileher father and mother were still alive, and without having beenmarried in the face of all the world.
5.   "Then I saw Alcmena, the wife of Amphitryon, who also bore to Joveindomitable Hercules; and Megara who was daughter to great King Creon,and married the redoubtable son of Amphitryon.
6.  Telemachus saw her long before any one else did. He was sittingmoodily among the suitors thinking about his brave father, and howhe would send them flying out of the house, if he were to come tohis own again and be honoured as in days gone by. Thus brooding ashe sat among them, he caught sight of Minerva and went straight to thegate, for he was vexed that a stranger should be kept waiting foradmittance. He took her right hand in his own, and bade her give himher spear. "Welcome," said he, "to our house, and when you havepartaken of food you shall tell us what you have come for."

应用

1.  This was what she said, and Ulysses was glad when he heard hertrying to get presents out of the suitors, and flattering them withfair words which he knew she did not mean.
2.  They gathered round the ghost of the son of Peleus, and the ghost ofAgamemnon joined them, sorrowing bitterly. Round him were gatheredalso the ghosts of those who had perished with him in the house ofAeisthus; and the ghost of Achilles spoke first.
3.  "Queen Arete," he exclaimed, "daughter of great Rhexenor, in mydistress I humbly pray you, as also your husband and these your guests(whom may heaven prosper with long life and happiness, and may theyleave their possessions to their children, and all the honoursconferred upon them by the state) to help me home to my own country assoon as possible; for I have been long in trouble and away from myfriends."
4、  "Listen to me," he cried, "you suitors of Queen Penelope, that I mayspeak even as I am minded. A man knows neither ache nor pain if hegets hit while fighting for his money, or for his sheep or his cattle;and even so Antinous has hit me while in the service of my miserablebelly, which is always getting people into trouble. Still, if the poorhave gods and avenging deities at all, I pray them that Antinous maycome to a bad end before his marriage."
5、  "As for myself I kept on puzzling to think how I could best savemy own life and those of my companions; I schemed and schemed, asone who knows that his life depends upon it, for the danger was verygreat. In the end I deemed that this plan would be the best. Themale sheep were well grown, and carried a heavy black fleece, so Ibound them noiselessly in threes together, with some of the withies onwhich the wicked monster used to sleep. There was to be a man underthe middle sheep, and the two on either side were to cover him, sothat there were three sheep to each man. As for myself there was a ramfiner than any of the others, so I caught hold of him by the back,esconced myself in the thick wool under his belly, and flung onpatiently to his fleece, face upwards, keeping a firm hold on it allthe time.

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  • 林建华 08-09

      Then Penelope came down from her room looking like Venus or Diana,and they set her a seat inlaid with scrolls of silver and ivory nearthe fire in her accustomed place. It had been made by Icmalius and hada footstool all in one piece with the seat itself; and it wascovered with a thick fleece: on this she now sat, and the maids camefrom the women's room to join her. They set about removing thetables at which the wicked suitors had been dining, and took awaythe bread that was left, with the cups from which they had drunk. Theyemptied the embers out of the braziers, and heaped much wood upon themto give both light and heat; but Melantho began to rail at Ulysses asecond time and said, "Stranger, do you mean to plague us by hangingabout the house all night and spying upon the women? Be off, youwretch, outside, and eat your supper there, or you shall be driven outwith a firebrand."

  • 江湖郎中 08-09

      Then she called her maids and said, "Stay where you are, yougirls. Can you not see a man without running away from him? Do youtake him for a robber or a murderer? Neither he nor any one else cancome here to do us Phaeacians any harm, for we are dear to the gods,and live apart on a land's end that juts into the sounding sea, andhave nothing to do with any other people. This is only some poor manwho has lost his way, and we must be kind to him, for strangers andforeigners in distress are under Jove's protection, and will take whatthey can get and be thankful; so, girls, give the poor fellowsomething to eat and drink, and wash him in the stream at some placethat is sheltered from the wind."

  • 廖玉惠 08-09

       "The man who had seduced her then said, 'Would you like to comealong with us to see the house of your parents and your parentsthemselves? They are both alive and are said to be well off.'

  • 张晓冬 08-09

      "I am not surprised, my dear mother, at your displeasure," repliedTelemachus, "I understand all about it and know when things are not asthey should be, which I could not do when I was younger; I cannot,however, behave with perfect propriety at all times. First one andthen another of these wicked people here keeps driving me out of mymind, and I have no one to stand by me. After all, however, this fightbetween Irus and the stranger did not turn out as the suitors meant itto do, for the stranger got the best of it. I wish Father Jove,Minerva, and Apollo would break the neck of every one of thesewooers of yours, some inside the house and some out; and I wish theymight all be as limp as Irus is over yonder in the gate of the outercourt. See how he nods his head like a drunken man; he has had sucha thrashing that he cannot stand on his feet nor get back to his home,wherever that may be, for has no strength left in him."

  • 徐琨鹏 08-08

    {  ULYSSES was left in the cloister, pondering on the means wherebywith Minerva's help he might be able to kill the suitors. Presently hesaid to Telemachus, "Telemachus, we must get the armour together andtake it down inside. Make some excuse when the suitors ask you why youhave removed it. Say that you have taken it to be out of the way ofthe smoke, inasmuch as it is no longer what it was when Ulysses wentaway, but has become soiled and begrimed with soot. Add to this moreparticularly that you are afraid Jove may set them on to quarrelover their wine, and that they may do each other some harm which maydisgrace both banquet and wooing, for the sight of arms sometimestempts people to use them."

  • 刘华伟 08-07

      "Thus spoke Proteus, and I was broken hearted as I heard him. Isat down upon the sands and wept; I felt as though I could no longerbear to live nor look upon the light of the sun. Presently, when I hadhad my fill of weeping and writhing upon the ground, the old man ofthe sea said, 'Son of Atreus, do not waste any more time in cryingso bitterly; it can do no manner of good; find your way home as fastas ever you can, for Aegisthus be still alive, and even though Oresteshas beforehand with you in kilting him, you may yet come in for hisfuneral.'}

  • 余盛明 08-07

      Ulysses answered, "Eumaeus, I have heard the story of yourmisfortunes with the most lively interest and pity, but Jove has givenyou good as well as evil, for in spite of everything you have a goodmaster, who sees that you always have enough to eat and drink; and youlead a good life, whereas I am still going about begging my way fromcity to city."

  • 施德 08-07

      Then Ulysses answered, "madam, wife of Ulysses, since you persist inasking me about my family, I will answer, no matter what it costsme: people must expect to be pained when they have been exiles as longas I have, and suffered as much among as many peoples. Nevertheless,as regards your question I will tell you all you ask. There is afair and fruitful island in mid-ocean called Crete; it is thicklypeopled and there are nine cities in it: the people speak manydifferent languages which overlap one another, for there are Achaeans,brave Eteocretans, Dorians of three-fold race, and noble Pelasgi.There is a great town there, Cnossus, where Minos reigned who everynine years had a conference with Jove himself. Minos was father toDeucalion, whose son I am, for Deucalion had two sons Idomeneus andmyself. Idomeneus sailed for Troy, and I, who am the younger, amcalled Aethon; my brother, however, was at once the older and the morevaliant of the two; hence it was in Crete that I saw Ulysses andshowed him hospitality, for the winds took him there as he was onhis way to Troy, carrying him out of his course from cape Malea andleaving him in Amnisus off the cave of Ilithuia, where the harboursare difficult to enter and he could hardly find shelter from the windsthat were then xaging. As soon as he got there he went into the townand asked for Idomeneus, claiming to be his old and valued friend, butIdomeneus had already set sail for Troy some ten or twelve daysearlier, so I took him to my own house and showed him every kind ofhospitality, for I had abundance of everything. Moreover, I fed themen who were with him with barley meal from the public store, andgot subscriptions of wine and oxen for them to sacrifice to theirheart's content. They stayed with me twelve days, for there was a galeblowing from the North so strong that one could hardly keep one's feeton land. I suppose some unfriendly god had raised it for them, buton the thirteenth day the wind dropped, and they got away."

  • 黄金缕 08-06

       Thus did they converse. Meanwhile the suitors were throwing discs,or aiming with spears at a mark on the levelled ground in front of thehouse, and behaving with all their old insolence. But when it wasnow time for dinner, and the flock of sheep and goats had come intothe town from all the country round, with their shepherds as usual,then Medon, who was their favourite servant, and who waited uponthem at table, said, "Now then, my young masters, you have hadenough sport, so come inside that we may get dinner ready. Dinner isnot a bad thing, at dinner time."

  • 兰某 08-04

    {  Here they found the ghost of Achilles son of Peleus, with those ofPatroclus, Antilochus, and Ajax, who was the finest and handsomest manof all the Danaans after the son of Peleus himself.

  • 韩熙庭 08-04

      "Mother- but you are so hard that I cannot call you by such aname- why do you keep away from my father in this way? Why do younot sit by his side and begin talking to him and asking him questions?No other woman could bear to keep away from her husband when he hadcome back to her after twenty years of absence, and after havinggone through so much; but your heart always was as hard as a stone."

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